Rdg and wrtg in content 12 13

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  • Why is it important to have students decorate the cover of their notebooks?
  • Alissa – Sends information into long term memory by crossing both hemispheresUsed for assessment – formative and summativeOrganizes information into schemaUsed to communicate with othersSelf assessmentAddress reading, writing, drawing, communicating in content areaSource of reflectionReferencePromote literacy
  • Alissa: Today you will create an ISN to record information during the training. Later you can use it as visual model to help your students get started.
  • Alissa
  • Alissa
  • Alissa: For young students it might be helpful to provide copies of the table of contents to glue in.Creating a class journal to model the process of journaling using a Big Book or a chart tablet.Students contribute by finding pictures and telling you what to record.Blank big books are available at www.abcstuff.com for $1.39 eachBreak
  • Alissa
  • Continue this activity by having participants draw arrows crossing the center line in the page to the other side. Discuss how the left brain controls the right side of the body and the right brain controls the left side of the body. This crosses the midline of the brain for eye hand coordination, fine motor skills, large motor skills.Now create a t-chart of the type of information that goes on each side.OUTPUT Brainstorming   Mind maps   Concept Maps   Venn Diagrams   Pictures   Drawings   Diagrams   Writing Prompts   Flow Charts   Lab & Self Reflections   Poems   Songs   WorksheetsINPUTClass notesDiscussion notesReading notesHandouts with new informationCreate a linguistic and non-linguistic representation to help you remember the left and right side orientation of the journal.Break
  • Alex: Go over definitions, but emphasize we will be working on Vocab and Comp today. “Today let’s investigate how we can support and strengthen literacy skills in the content areas by focusing on vocabulary.”Decoding – phonemic awareness: spoken words are made up of individual units of sound; phonics: relationship between the letters in written words and the sound of these words when spokenMorphology – things like an S to make a word plural or the –ed to make it past tense
  • Alex: What challenges have you noticed students have with vocabulary? Brainstorm list on right side of notebook and add to your table of contents as “2S”. Have a volunteer scribe on chart paper.
  • Alex: These were ones noted nationally. 1- thoughts? ELLS? 2 – Huge! Even more so with STAAR – we need to use the vocabulary that is used in the TEKS 3 - MM words is an important challenge. Let’s see how MM words could impact student learning and performance.Introduce STAAR chart activity here: handout STAAR Chemistry charts. Have teachers highlight each word that has multiple meaning.
  • Alex: Go over definition of Academic words. Brick – content – Revolution, perpendicular Mortar – academic: conclude, infer, predict, evaluate, analyze – (TEK verbs – transferrable across all content areas)Hand out released STAAR questions – highlight the brick words in one color & the Mortar words in another colorOn left side of notebook create a linguistic and non-linguistic representation of way to remember the difference between brick and mortar words.
  • Go over slide contentFrayer model pg. 13-14Concept definition map pg. 8-9Trading cards – bighugelabs.com pg. 28Mnemonics pg. 22For early finishers:VVWA pg. 30-31Vocabulary word map pg. 34-36Window pane pg. 38Put the foldable on the right hand side of IN. On left hand side of your IN, journal about how this is the same or different from what you are already doing in your content area.
  • Alex: discuss content – Definition – defined directly in article (The arbitrator, the neutral person chosen to settle the dispute, arrived at her decision.) Restatement or synonym – other words are used in in sentence in a similar meaning (The slender woman was so thin her clothes were too big on her.) Contrast or antonym – often signaled by the words whereas, unlike, or as opposed to (Unlike Tracy’s room, which was immaculate, Leslie’s room was messy.) Inference or Gist clues – clues that help (Sharks recover rapidly from severe injuries and appear to be impervious to infection, cancers, and circulatory diseases.)
  • Using the “Shark” article and the “Knowledge Rating” strategy pg. 18 of Developing Content Vocabulary book, read the article and record any vocabulary that you feel your students would struggle with. Be sure to score the vocabulary words.Break for lunchEach team will be assigned a different vocabulary development strategy. Choose a word of your knowledge rating page and complete the vocabulary strategy as a team and share out
  • Alissa: “graph” root word foldableThis strategy can encompass all content areas. The root word we are using “graph” which means something written; a diagram; a chart. We are going to create a fold to look at different words with the same root.GeographyPhonographPhotographHydrographyYou need 8 words total to use your personal devices to find 8 more words to add to your foldable. Inside each flap, include a picture and meaning for each word.
  • Have tables talk and share thoughts on these quotes. Which means the most to them, why?Share who Jamika is from Keene’s To Understand
  • Hand out The Daily Times Navajo articleCuriosity – how did the American Indians help us win WWIIPurpose – to read for the purpose what you did to comprehend this articleReturn to text: The Three A’s GO – fold page to make a 4 square & cut out one of the squares top square – Create an Artistic Response to reading (drawing, poem or song) Inside front– Analyze text (not just a summary, but answers ?’s: What did the author do well? How can the writer improve?) Inside – All about me – personal response in any form. Could be a personal allusion, a personal connection, or reaction to the text Us e responses for discussion and sharing
  • Discuss this quote at your tables… thoughts?
  • -Vocabulary is BIG! Word choice is crucial-Organizational strategies – model & samples Jeff Anderson What Does Every Writer Need to Know – has his own scientific method observe/notice (observe what the writing is doing), question/interact (highlight what you notice, jot down reactions & talk with partner), hypothesize/name (build theories about what you see happening in the text & why author made that choice – name the effects), test/experiment (apply something the writer did through imitation or revision), conclude/reflect (think about how & when you will use this craft in other writings)-RAFT to come- Critical to independent readers/writers/thinkers
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • •Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist? •Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? Other students? Parents? Local community? School board? Other characters in the text?•Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?•Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? Who will be the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
  • On the left side of your journal, think of 2-3 projects/assignments where you could use RAFT for writing in your content areas.
  • Rdg and wrtg in content 12 13

    1. 1. While Waiting People Search: Find someone who… Travel through the room and find 6 colleagues who can answer one of the questions on the “People Search” task. You MUST write their response and name in the box.
    2. 2. Reading & Writing in the Content Areas Melissa ISD New Teacher Orientation August 2012
    3. 3. Agenda 8:00-11:30 “Reading & Writing in the Content Areas” 11:30-12:30 Lunch 12:30- 3:30 “Reading & Writing in the Content Areas” cont‟d
    4. 4. “Language arts and reading teachers need content-area teachers to show students how to read and write like a scientist, historian, or mathematician. All teachers in all subject areas share the responsibility for literacy development. Today, more and more content-area teachers recognize this responsibility and are incorporating content literacy into their teaching through a variety of instructional strategies.”Richard Vacca, Author of Content Area Reading: Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum
    5. 5. Why Personalize? Today, we will be making Interactive Notebooks (INs). Please use the materials on the tables to create a cover for your notebook. This should be personal to you or reflect the content that you will be teaching. Samples
    6. 6. Interactive Notebooking Key Ideas • Interactive journaling will make a difference! • Students are actively engaged in thinking and communicating. • Students feel “ownership” because they are creating meaningful knowledge for themselves. • There‟s no “right” or “wrong” way. • Modify to find ways that work best for you and your students.
    7. 7. Why Interactive Notebooks EngageStudents • Students use both their visual and linguistic intelligences • Note taking becomes an active process • Notebooks help students to systematically organize as they learn • Notebooks become a portfolio on individual learning
    8. 8. The first page you create is a title page (like a book). You decide the title for your ISN.
    9. 9. The back of the first page create and Author’s Biography page. Include: •Name •Birthday •Hobbies Draw, write, or use photos to describe yourself on this page.
    10. 10. Reserve 2 or more pages after the title page for a Table of Contents (like a book)
    11. 11. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion Specialization
    12. 12. Are you a right brain or left brainthinker? Brain Hemisphere Puzzle Cat Illusion
    13. 13. How Interactive Notebooks Differ fromOther Journals • INs have a “left-side, right-side” orientation to help students record, organize, and process new information. This takes advantage of the way each hemisphere of the brain works! Much of the classroom and homework can be done in the interactive notebook. • INs are not used just as a storehouse of information. The students are expected to continually reflect and show evidence of this reflection through “left hand” assignments.
    14. 14. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2T
    15. 15. Interactive Notebook Entry • Turn to your Table of Contents (TOC), and record your first entry title as IN Representation in the far left column as assignment # 2S. In the right side column record the entry title as IN Notes as assignment # 2T. • On the Right hand page of your journal, fold your paper in half (red line to red line). Create a T-Chart to record the characteristics of left brain and right brain thinkers.
    16. 16. Key Literacy Components • Decoding – correctly decipher a particular word out of a group of letters • Morphology – study of word structure; how words are formed from the smallest unit of meaning in a word • Fluency – ability to read text accurately with appropriate speed and proper intonation and expression • Vocabulary – words used in speech and print to communicate • Text Comprehension – process of extracting or constructing meaning from words National Institute for Literacy, What Content-Area Teachers Should Know About Adolescent Literacy, 2007
    17. 17. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TStudent Challenges 3S Multi-Meaning 3Tw/ Vocabulary Words
    18. 18. Part I: Vocabulary “Resist the list!” – Alana Morris, author of Vocabulary Unplugged “We must instruct, model, do guided practice, and then gradually release students from simply „knowing‟ words to actually owning and using them in real contexts.” – Alana Morris, Vocabulary Unplugged National Institute for Literacy, What Content-Area Teachers Should Know About Adolescent Literacy, 2007
    19. 19. Vocabulary Challenges • Challenges – Decoding multisyllabic words – Content specific words – Multiple meaning words – Lack of strategies for dealing with these National Institute for Literacy, What Content-Area Teachers Should Know About Adolescent Literacy, 2007
    20. 20. Academic Vocabulary • Some students don‟t have adequate academic vocabulary. • Words used in many subject areas, often seen in textbooks, assignment directions, test questions, etc. • Examples: Recognize, analyze, results, impact, relationship
    21. 21. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TStudent Challenges 3S Multi-Meaning 3Tw/ Vocabulary WordsB&M 4S B&M words STAAR 4TRepresentation
    22. 22. How can instruction help with vocabulary? • Repeated exposures to words using a variety of techniques. – Pre-Teach Difficult Vocabulary – Teach Academic Vocabulary too – Direct, Explicit, and Systemic Instruction 1. Explain meaning and model in sentences 2. Guide students to practice in sentences and contexts and provide feedback 3. Independent practice – peer work, reciprocal teaching, collaborative learning 4. Repeat until they can use the words independently when reading and writing National Institute for Literacy, What Content-Area Teachers Should Know About Adolescent Literacy, 2007
    23. 23. Vocabulary Continued – Teach how to use context • Definition or Explanation Clues • Restatement or Synonym Clues • Contrast or Antonym Clues • Inference or Gist Clues – Teach Word Parts • Roots • Affixes • Relationships (vocabulary trees) – Use Graphic Organizers & Foldables National Institute for Literacy, What Content-Area Teachers Should Know About Adolescent Literacy, 2007
    24. 24. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TStudent Challenges 3S Multi-Meaning 3Tw/ Vocabulary WordsB&M 4S B&M words STAAR 4TRepresentationVocabulary Strategy 5S Vocabulary 5T Knowledge Rating
    25. 25. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TStudent Challenges 3S Multi-Meaning 3Tw/ Vocabulary WordsB&M 4S B&M words STAAR 4TRepresentationVocabulary Strategy 5S Vocabulary 5T Knowledge RatingRoot Word Foldable 6S- graph
    26. 26. Reading Comprehension “All thinking begins with wonder.” ~ Socrates “When the mind is thinking, it is talking to itself.” ~ Plato “The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.” ~ Albert Einstein “ But, none a y‟all ever say what make sense mean.” ~ Jamika “Reading is the greatest single effort that the human mind undertakes, and one must do it as a child.” ~ John Steinbeck
    27. 27. How do I know if I don‟t understand? • I don‟t know how to start (5th grade) • I start panicking and slump and hope the teacher doesn‟t call on me (9th grade) • When your teacher gives you a weird look (7th grade) • When I have to read something over and over (4th grade) • I just stare at the paper (9th grade) • My mind feels blank (8th grade) • I have to ask a million questions (3rd grade) • It just doesn‟t click (8th grade) • I get angry and frustrated (10th grade)
    28. 28. What do I do when I don‟t understand? • I ask my friends for help (6th grade) • I guess (9th grade) • Skip it and come back to it (10th grade) • Stop looking at the teacher (8th grade) • Get bored & start doodling (9th grade) • I just stop reading (7th grade) • Ask the teacher (6th grade) • I keep it in so I don‟t feel so dumb (4th grade) • Go back and re-read (8th grade) • I don‟t finish it (7th grade)
    29. 29. How do I know if I do understand? • You see pictures in your head (3rd grade) • I get it because I can solve the problem (6th grade) • I don‟t need anyone‟s help (9th grade) • I can explain it to the class (10th grade) • You know exactly what you are doing (7th grade) • I can answer questions for someone else (10th grade) • I know I can handle it (4th grade) • I get what is going on (8th grade)
    30. 30. Model for Teaching Challenging Text Surface Build Background and Understanding Curiosity Read with Purpose Provide Reasons to Return to the Text Collaborate & Talk Deeper Associate & Make it Personal Understanding Analyze Based on Kelly Gallagher‟s Model Gallagher, K. (2004). Deeper Reading. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse.
    31. 31. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Hemisphere 1S Hemisphere 1TConclusion SpecializationIN Representation 2S IN Notes 2TStudent Challenges 3S Multi-Meaning 3Tw/ Vocabulary WordsB&M 4S B&M words STAAR 4TRepresentationVocabulary Strategy 5S Vocabulary 5T Knowledge RatingRoot Word Foldable 6S- graphReading Reading Comprehension-Comprehension- 3 As 7S Article 7T
    32. 32. Writing in the Content Areas “Writing helps students get more actively engaged in subject matter, understand information and concepts more deeply, make connections and raise questions more fluently, remember ideas longer, and apply learning in new situations. If we say that reading helps us take in knowledge, with writing, we make it our own.” Harvey Daniels & Steven Zemelman, Content- Area Writing: Every Teacher’s Guide
    33. 33. Writing Challenges • Writing in the content areas is about writing to learn the content or writing to develop thinking. • It can also be about learning to write the genre of the content. • Challenges – Limited vocabulary – Lack of organizational strategies – Lack of experience with content writing – Lack of self-regulation or self-monitoring
    34. 34. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Brainstorm RAFT in 8S RAFT Notes 8TContent Area
    35. 35. R.A.F.T. Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”? Writer? Character (in the text)? Artist? Politician? Scientist?
    36. 36. R.A.F.T. Role: In developing the final Audience: Who should the product, what role will the students consider as the students need to “take on”? audience for the product? Other Writer? Character (in the text)? students? Parents? Local Artist? Politician? Scientist? community? School board? Other characters in the text?
    37. 37. R.A.F.T. Role: In developing the final Audience: Who should the product, what role will the students consider as the students need to “take on”? audience for the product? Other Writer? Character (in the text)? students? Parents? Local Artist? Politician? Scientist? community? School board? Other characters in the text? Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students‟ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text? A writing task? Art work? Action plan? Project?
    38. 38. R.A.F.T. Role: In developing the final Audience: Who should the product, what role will the students consider as the students need to “take on”? audience for the product? Other Writer? Character (in the text)? students? Parents? Local Artist? Politician? Scientist? community? School board? Other characters in the text? Format: What is the best product Topic: This is the when, who, or that will demonstrate the what that will be the students‟ in-depth understanding focus/subject of the final product. of their interactions with the text? Will it take place in the same time A writing task? Art work? Action period as the novel? Who will be plan? Project? the main focus of the product? What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
    39. 39. R.A.F.T.
    40. 40. Table of Contents Entry Title Assignment # Entry Title Assignment #Brainstorm RAFT in 8S RAFT Notes 8TContent AreaReading & Writing 9Sin the ContentAreas Reflection
    41. 41. Reflection Journal 2-3 ideas you can take away from today into your classroom and how you will use them.
    42. 42. Resources • Akhavan, Nancy. The Content-Rich Reading and Writing Workshop: A Time-Saving Approach for Making the Most of Your Literacy Block. • Allen, Janet. Tools for Teaching Content Literacy. • Beers, Kylene. When Kids Can’t Read What Teachers can Do: A Guide for Teachers 6-12. • Burke, Jim. Illuminating Texts: How to Teach Students to Read the World. • Burke, Jim. Reading Reminders: Tools, Tips, and Techniques. • Burke, Jim. Tools for Thought: Graphic Organizers for Your Classroom. • Daniels, Harvey and Stephanie Harvey. Comprehension and Collaboration. • Daniels, Harvey. Content-Area Writing: Every Teachers Guide. • Daniels, Harvey. Subjects Matter: Every Teachers Guide to Content-Area Reading. • Fisher, Douglas. Reading for Information in Elementary School: Content Literacy Strategies to Build Comprehension. • Gallagher, K. (2004). Deeper Reading. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse. • Keene, E.O. (2008) To Understand: New Horizons in Reading Comprehension. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. • Miller, Debbie. Reading with Meaning. • Morris, Alana. Vocabulary Unplugged. • Tovani, Chris. I Read It, But I Don’t Get It: Comprehension Strategies for Adolescent Readers. • Wormeli, Rick. Summarization in Any Subject: 50 Techniques to Improve Student Learning.

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