The Meetings Report     Seminar Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013    9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
AaronWolowiec.com@AaronWolowiec
Learning Road Map•   Outcomes•   Background•   Report review•   Survey data•   Break•   Carousel activity•   Five recommen...
ENGAGEMENT
1. Benchmarking data2. National surveys3. Michigan experience
Partners
Aaron      CherylWolowiec   RonkAlex       KristenKontras    Parker
1. Senior education/professional development staff2. Association meetings3. Professional speaker hiring practices4. Indust...
1. 65 questions2. Web-based survey3. April 4, 2012 to May 7, 20124. Sent to 277 organizations5. 67 responses6. Response ra...
1. Background2. Table of contents3. Key recommendations4. Narrative5. Annual budget comparisons6. 18 tables and three figu...
1. First-ever Michigan association meetings   industry survey2. Countless data, insights and trends3. Benchmarking metrics...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
Survey DataNumber   Section1        Organization demographics2        Function leader3        2011 meetings calendar4     ...
1. Diversify revenue2. Reward difference3. Value context4. Maximize opportunities5. Prioritize learning
Diversify Revenue• Increase percentage of  annual revenue from  meetings• Leverage exhibitions  and sponsorships• Consider...
Reward Difference• Function leaders/staff• Speaker bureau services• CVB services• Methods used to get  ideas about speaker...
Value Context• Position titles/salaries• Total number of  concurrent sessions• Percentage of members  attending major meet...
Maximize Opportunities• College/university  internship programs• Blended learning and  digital meeting formats• Outsourcin...
Prioritize Learning• Utilize professional/  industry speakers• Schedule intentional  speaker follow-up• Call for presentat...
1. Diversify revenue2. Reward difference3. Value context4. Maximize opportunities5. Prioritize learning
Next Steps• Refine ideas  – Action items  – Resources  – Completion dates• Implement ideas• Accountability  – Partner/team...
Final Thoughts• Business as usual is not an option• Evaluate current education strategies• Operationalize the report’s key...
• Elevate the quality and sophistication  of your programs• Build the reputation of your meetings  department• Improve the...
Leave a business card…I’ll email the slide deck.
Aaron D. WolowiecMSA, CAE, CMP, CTA                     (616) 710-1891                     aaron@eventgarde.com           ...
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
The Meetings Report Seminar
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The Meetings Report Seminar

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Aaron delivered this presentation during the MSAE-sponsored Meetings Report Seminar on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, in Okemos, MI.

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  • These worksheets track along with the content I’ll be presenting today.You’ll want to have available a writing utensil throughout today’s program.
  • We’ll have a number of opportunities to connect and engage with one another throughout the next three hours.Take advantage of this opportunity to connect with friends, meet new people and expand your professional networks.In a few moments you’ll begin with a small group activity that will help you identify your goals/objectives for attending today’s program.A bit later this morning you’ll have the opportunity to really dig into, study and interpret The Meetings Report findings.After a short break we’ll get out of our seats to participate in what’s called a carousel activity.You’ll also have several opportunities as we discuss strategy to reflect on your own practice, debrief with a partner and report out to the group.Should you have a question at any point in time, please don’t hesitate to ask.
  • Why are you here? What are your goals/objectives for attending today’sprogram? What do you hope to learn/achieve? Think in terms ofoutcomes. – 10 minutesForm groups of three – 1 min.Introduce yourselves – 2 min.Brainstorm a list of your responses – 90 secondsSelect two to share with the group – 30 secondsResponses are read aloud and recorded on a flipchart – 5 min.
  • Small: Less than $500,000Medium: $500,000 to $4.9 million Large: $5 million and more
  • Does everyone have a copy of The Meetings Report?Break attendees up into seven groups.Each group is assigned to one of the seven sections of The Meetings Report.Each group has 10 minutes to review its designated section and note key findings in the appropriate spaces on the provided worksheets.The second column, labeled “aha moments,” should be used to record individual, team, organization or industry implications.The final column labeled “application” should be left blank at this time.At the end of 10 minutes, each small group will have a total of three minutes to share report findings and aha moments with the larger group.
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • Small group has a total of three minutes to report key findings and aha moments (individual, team, organization or industry implications) to the larger group.We’ll open up the floor for discussion/questions about key findings and aha moments.Finally, all participants will be encouraged to consider the application of this section to their organization. The final column on the provided worksheets should be used to take notes.Time permitting, Aaron will ask participants to share examples of how this section applies to their organization (i.e., what changes they might consider making or how they align with provided metrics/trends).
  • We’ll begin with a simple carousel activity. Participants will count off by five and they will be assigned to one of the five flipcharts. – 15 minutesCount off and relocate to flipcharts – 2 minutesStation 1 – 2 minutesMove to station 2 – 30 secondsStation 2 – 2 minutesMove to station 3 – 30 secondsStation 3 – 2 minutesMove to station 4 – 30 secondsStation 4 – 2 minutesMove to station 5 – 30 secondsStation 5 – 2 minutesMove back to your seat – 30 seconds
  • Diversify Revenue – This applies both to the percentage of annual revenue attributed to conventions, exhibits and meetings, as well as the type and number of meetings your organization plans each year. (15 minutes)As a disciplined approach to managing meeting and event activities, strategic meetings management aligns measurable business objectives (e.g., revenue) with an organization’s strategic goals and vision. According to this research, Michigan associations have room for growth in this emerging business initiative.Most organizations receive only a small percentage of their annual revenue from conventions, exhibits and meetingsExhibitions and sponsorships are widely underutilized as viable revenue streamsA majority of organizations do not offer formal certification programs, a promising revenue source for the right associationA majority of organizations attribute only a small proportion of their annual income to their major annual meetings
  • Debrief “diversify revenue” flipchart from the carousel activity.
  • Take a moment to look at your notes and reflect on each of these strategies to “diversify revenue.” Which are doable? Which would have the most significant payoff? Select at least one and commit to implementing it within this calendar year. It can be on a small scale. It doesn’t have to be an overwhelming or insurmountable task. Don’t make it more than it has to be. Minor tweaks to your education strategy will have a positive impact. Circle or star the strategy you’re planning to implement and then jot down the first few action items you’ll need to complete – and in what time frame – in the “application” column of your worksheet. When you’re finished, turn to your neighbor to share your plan and further brainstorm next steps. Time permitting, Aaron will seek volunteers to share with the group what changes they intend to make within their organization.
  • Reward Difference – The way we interpret and negotiate the world is informed by our unique identity, culture and experience. Greater diversity means greater variation, creativity and innovation in shaping quality education offerings. (15 minutes)The way we interpret and negotiate the world is informed by our identity, culture and experience. Greater diversity means greater variation in perspectives and approaches. According to this research, the Michigan meetings industry lacks this important diversity of thought (which has the potential to affect program content and dynamics).Most education and professional development departments are led by white/Caucasian womenMost organizations are either not utilizing the complimentary services of speaker bureaus or are not doing so consistently, severely limiting their access to qualified professional speakers The most popular methods organizations use to get ideas about new professional speakers include recommendations from peers, members and staff, as well as speakers they’ve seen/worked with beforeIn many organizations, the chief staff executive alone holds the authority to make final decisions about which professional speakers to hireMost organizations rely on their chief staff executive to make final decisions in selecting major annual meeting venues
  • Debrief “reward difference” flipchart from the carousel activity.
  • Take a moment to look at your notes and reflect on each of these strategies to “reward difference.” Which are doable? Which would have the most significant payoff? Select at least one and commit to implementing it within this calendar year. It can be on a small scale. It doesn’t have to be an overwhelming or insurmountable task. Don’t make it more than it has to be. Minor tweaks to your education strategy will have a positive impact. Circle or star the strategy you’re planning to implement and then jot down the first few action items you’ll need to complete – and in what time frame – in the “application” column of your worksheet. When you’re finished, turn to your neighbor to share your plan and further brainstorm next steps. Time permitting, Aaron will seek volunteers to share with the group what changes they intend to make within their organization.
  • Value Context – It’s vitally important to meet the needs of both your members and your industry. Therefore, all the research in the world is meaningless if not applied within the unique context of your organization. (15 minutes)To the extent possible, respondent data were analyzed by a variety of different methods to provide the association community with informative benchmarking statistics that could be used in strategic planning. Occasionally, no significant trends emerged. Therefore, it’s important to consider all research findings within the unique context of each organization’s industry.The association community is inconsistent in its use of position titles and its assignment of salaries for senior education and professional development staffThe total number of concurrent sessions offered by organizations during their 2011 major meetings varied considerablyAssociations reported substantial differences in the percentage of members attending their major annual meeting based on the type and average number of members comprising their organizationAlthough almost uniformly generous, compensation packages provided by organizations to industry speakers who presented at their 2011 major meetings varied widelyFormal evaluations collected by organizations from attendees at or following their 2011 major meetings differed significantly in form and content
  • Debrief “value context” flipchart from the carousel activity.
  • Take a moment to look at your notes and reflect on each of these strategies to “value context.” Which are doable? Which would have the most significant payoff? Select at least one and commit to implementing it within this calendar year. It can be on a small scale. It doesn’t have to be an overwhelming or insurmountable task. Don’t make it more than it has to be. Minor tweaks to your education strategy will have a positive impact. Circle or star the strategy you’re planning to implement and then jot down the first few action items you’ll need to complete – and in what time frame – in the “application” column of your worksheet. When you’re finished, turn to your neighbor to share your plan and further brainstorm next steps. Time permitting, Aaron will seek volunteers to share with the group what changes they intend to make within their organization.
  • Maximize Opportunities – Associations must employ meetings industry best practices if they expect to stay relevant, competitive and sustainable. This means embracing change and encouraging a healthy amount of experimentation. (15 minutes)As the professional development landscape changes, organizations must employ meeting industry best practices if they expect to stay relevant, competitive and sustainable. This research suggests that Michigan associations could improve and complement their existing suite of member services by leveraging industry standards, practices and networks.While education and professional development functions are likely understaffed, organizations also fail to capitalize on internship opportunitiesBlended learning and virtual meeting formats remain highly underutilizedAssociations outsource few meeting planning activities, potentially compromising organization/department strengths and competenciesBy and large, associations do not optimize the presence of professional speakers by asking them to provide additional activities beyond a face-to-face presentationA number of organizations did not collect formal evaluations from attendees at or following their 2011 major meetingsMost organizations do not provide live video streaming of keynote/plenary or concurrent sessions at their major annual meetings
  • Debrief “maximize opportunities” flipchart from the carousel activity.
  • Take a moment to look at your notes and reflect on each of these strategies to “maximize opportunities.” Which are doable? Which would have the most significant payoff? Select at least one and commit to implementing it within this calendar year. It can be on a small scale. It doesn’t have to be an overwhelming or insurmountable task. Don’t make it more than it has to be. Minor tweaks to your education strategy will have a positive impact. Circle or star the strategy you’re planning to implement and then jot down the first few action items you’ll need to complete – and in what time frame – in the “application” column of your worksheet. When you’re finished, turn to your neighbor to share your plan and further brainstorm next steps. Time permitting, Aaron will seek volunteers to share with the group what changes they intend to make within their organization.
  • Prioritize Learning – When resources are diverted from professional development to meetings management, learning can be compromised. To ensure the integrity of your programs, learning must take precedence over logistics. (15 minutes)Aside from networking, learning remains the most important outcome of any education program. And when staff resources are diverted from the intricacies of professional development to manage meeting logistics, learning can be compromised. Research findings suggest unsophisticated meeting practices may be affecting education quality.Many organizations elect not to hire professional speakersAssociations investing in professional speakers generally secure them four to seven months prior to meetings, meaning generic or outdated content is possible without intentional/scheduled follow-up Some organizations do not secure industry speakers to present at their major annual meetings, failing to capitalize on member knowledge and expertiseA majority of organizations did not issue a call for presentations for their 2011 major meetings, likely limiting the strength of their presentation lineupsA majority of organizations did not prepare industry speakers for their 2011 major meetingsMost organizations collecting formal evaluations for their 2011 major meetings did not measure whether learning occurredMany organizations expanded speaker session submissions for their 2011 major meetings, potentially obscuring speaker intent and impacting both promotional materials and evaluation metrics
  • Debrief “prioritize learning” flipchart from the carousel activity.
  • Take a moment to look at your notes and reflect on each of these strategies to “prioritize learning.” Which are doable? Which would have the most significant payoff? Select at least one and commit to implementing it within this calendar year. It can be on a small scale. It doesn’t have to be an overwhelming or insurmountable task. Don’t make it more than it has to be. Minor tweaks to your education strategy will have a positive impact. Circle or star the strategy you’re planning to implement and then jot down the first few action items you’ll need to complete – and in what time frame – in the “application” column of your worksheet. When you’re finished, turn to your neighbor to share your plan and further brainstorm next steps. Time permitting, Aaron will seek volunteers to share with the group what changes they intend to make within their organization.
  • The Meetings Report Seminar

    1. 1. The Meetings Report Seminar Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
    2. 2. AaronWolowiec.com@AaronWolowiec
    3. 3. Learning Road Map• Outcomes• Background• Report review• Survey data• Break• Carousel activity• Five recommendations• Final thoughts• Wrap-up
    4. 4. ENGAGEMENT
    5. 5. 1. Benchmarking data2. National surveys3. Michigan experience
    6. 6. Partners
    7. 7. Aaron CherylWolowiec RonkAlex KristenKontras Parker
    8. 8. 1. Senior education/professional development staff2. Association meetings3. Professional speaker hiring practices4. Industry speaker preparation and compensation5. Meeting evaluation practices
    9. 9. 1. 65 questions2. Web-based survey3. April 4, 2012 to May 7, 20124. Sent to 277 organizations5. 67 responses6. Response rate of 24 percent7. Informative, but not definitive
    10. 10. 1. Background2. Table of contents3. Key recommendations4. Narrative5. Annual budget comparisons6. 18 tables and three figures
    11. 11. 1. First-ever Michigan association meetings industry survey2. Countless data, insights and trends3. Benchmarking metrics/statistics4. Instructive, actionable and universal tactics5. Annual association education strategy6. Redefines how success is measured7. Valuable to both associations/industry partners
    12. 12. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    13. 13. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    14. 14. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    15. 15. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    16. 16. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    17. 17. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    18. 18. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    19. 19. Survey DataNumber Section1 Organization demographics2 Function leader3 2011 meetings calendar4 Professional speakers5 2011 major meeting6 Industry speakers7 Evaluations
    20. 20. 1. Diversify revenue2. Reward difference3. Value context4. Maximize opportunities5. Prioritize learning
    21. 21. Diversify Revenue• Increase percentage of annual revenue from meetings• Leverage exhibitions and sponsorships• Consider developing credentialing programs• Maximize major meeting income
    22. 22. Reward Difference• Function leaders/staff• Speaker bureau services• CVB services• Methods used to get ideas about speakers• Decisions about professional speakers• Decisions about major meeting venues
    23. 23. Value Context• Position titles/salaries• Total number of concurrent sessions• Percentage of members attending major meeting• Industry speaker compensation packages• Form and content of formal evaluations
    24. 24. Maximize Opportunities• College/university internship programs• Blended learning and digital meeting formats• Outsourcing meeting planning activities• Optimizing speakers• Collecting evaluations• Live video streaming
    25. 25. Prioritize Learning• Utilize professional/ industry speakers• Schedule intentional speaker follow-up• Call for presentations• Speaker preparation• Measure learning• Verify expanded speaker submissions
    26. 26. 1. Diversify revenue2. Reward difference3. Value context4. Maximize opportunities5. Prioritize learning
    27. 27. Next Steps• Refine ideas – Action items – Resources – Completion dates• Implement ideas• Accountability – Partner/team• Evaluate/repeat
    28. 28. Final Thoughts• Business as usual is not an option• Evaluate current education strategies• Operationalize the report’s key recommendations• Develop actionable next steps• Implement new strategies within this calendar year
    29. 29. • Elevate the quality and sophistication of your programs• Build the reputation of your meetings department• Improve the association’s bottom line
    30. 30. Leave a business card…I’ll email the slide deck.
    31. 31. Aaron D. WolowiecMSA, CAE, CMP, CTA (616) 710-1891 aaron@eventgarde.com www.eventgarde.com

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