Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Helping people with disabilities
Form meaningful relationships
Aaron Johannes
aaron@spectrumsociety.org
Intro / housekeeping
• Parking lot
• References and documents
• Google “imagineacircle” and “diigo” find
renegotiating rec...
intro
Every job there is…
• Support 100+ people over 27 years
• Every job
• I went back to school because I wanted some
answers…
Spectrum Consulting. Collaborative:
Learning, Research, Press
• To increase influence of
person centred,
individualized op...
Small Projects
Small Projects
B.C. Family Support Institute
Optimal Planning Project
with David Wetherow
Small changes:
communication that invited
partnership and input
I can’t write it but I can draw it
Our Question Together
Why does it matter whether we can support
people with disabilities to have relationships
and be part...
WHY DO RELATIONSHIPS
MATTER? (workbook: 5 reasons)
What sorts of people should be included… and how?
Introducing the BMX model of inclusion
Erica S. McFadden and Judith A. S...
Research into Support Networks:
The numbers changed…
Story of the red haired girl
“We are not welcome there”
• “This might work for your people
but our people are harder”
• “Our community is less
welcomin...
Albert
Facilitating belonging
Albert
Facilitating belonging
• “I’m not sure why they
brought you in, this is
hopeless. No one will ever
want anything to...
Facilitating belonging
• “Albert is wondering can you pass
the sugar?”
• “Oh, I was going to get a bun and
I forgot – is i...
Back to:
“We are not welcome there.”
• We go to the Friendship Centre
every Weds for soup and
bannock. No one talks to us....
Setting Conditions (“events”)
• Manager in an
overwhelmed fear state
• Staff perceived their
sense of self worth from
an i...
Connected with aboriginal
Social Worker
• Introduced to Friendship Centre
staff
• Changed the time of their visit
• Starte...
Chester Finn
“They get to know you.
And, you know, they can’t
help but be involved.”
Berkeley University, Oral
Histories o...
Moving from a delusion of introduction to
statements & assumptions of belonging
“Who do you know?”
Moving from a delusion of introduction to
statements & assumptions of belonging
Skating together:
incongruent mission and protocols
Incongruence:
asking what’s wanted…
PARENTS:
A circle of friends
Watching over him
Including him in activities
Expandi...
The goal might be way more simple
than we think…
How hard is it to make friends?
Prom Dress
Amanda and limo
Amanda and cupcakes
Amanda and cupcakes
Pay it forward: Fort St. John
2nd Anniversary
WORKBOOK: THANKS!
Slideshare “Out of the Day Program”
Part 2: ROLE OF SUPPORTS
Which do you choose?
“You bust it we fix it”
“If your pipes ain’t flowing and your air
ain’t blowing call us”
Mind Maps
Who are we?
Rebels
What would your business card look like?
• Research on support
networks for people with
disabilities changed
significantly in the 80s…
• Why do you think?
• Paid f...
“A person’s needs are best met by
people whose needs are met.”
Jean Clark
wordles
A Word-Cloud takes the most frequent word choices and makes them
appear bigger: it’s a way to tell graphically what matter...
“Progress: Limited or Unlimited”
1958 Minnesota Planning Documents for Transitions to
Community from Institutions.
Michael Kendrick:
“Life Giving Values”
John Lord:
“Principles of the New Story”
David Pitonyak:
“Who Holds Your Story?”
Aaron Johannes:
“Aspects of Self-Governance: Three Stories of Women
With Disabilities”
3 vision statements from organizations
3 Public Job Postings from Anonymous
Agencies in B.C.
Employee Code of Conduct
Community Support Worker
Job Description
wordles
So, what is your role?
Training for independence
Health and safety
Build relationships
Documentation
Manage the budget
Com...
How does it feel to have a gift & find a
community where it’s appreciated? Does
this happen at work?
Solution Circles
Albert’s story
Instructional Strategies
The dictionary defines instruction as a “precept” (the teaching of
something known about our cult...
EMBEDDING PRACTICES
"[I]t is from the relational matrix that the very
possibility of individual sense making comes into
being, and without the...
Starbucks Guy
“We are now furiously
improvising our way through
a situations for which there
is no script and if you are a...
“Without clarity, people will start making up stuff…
often the stuff they make up has to do with them not
getting ‘into tr...
How do Adults learn?
• Staff • Folks we support
Concierge Learning – Jane Hart
“Have you ever really had a teacher?
One who saw you as a raw but precious thing,
a jewel that, with wisdom,
could be poli...
How do we teach?
Paulo Freire and co-learning
“Power gets the job: Priming power
improves interview outcomes.” Lammersa,
Duboisb, Ruckerc, Galinskyd
PRIMING: think of a...
We are always somewhere
on the steps…
Liz
Captain Grace Hopper
Small and Viral Changes
• Small projects
• Small changes
Planning = 99.59% success
• WORKBOOK
• What changes will you make / manifest
– To agency?
– To agency leaders?
– To family...
Cousin Dan the Handy-man
WORKBOOK:
HOW WILL WE BE TOGETHER?
An open reading of Waddie Welcome
and the Beloved Community
How might we do this?
Winterbourne. June 2011
“We suggest a redefinition of the
role of the service and support
organizations. Rather than solel...
Making a Plan
• 3 Insights • 3 Intentions
WORKBOOK:
Belonging and Community Zine
Unexpected gifts
Questions?
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies

752 views

Published on

We all want to contribute, and we are all necessary to co-create an effective and whole community. I often think of the Australian Aboriginal elders who, when people with disabilities were returned, their names and totems and tribes forgotten, said "We knew something was missing from the Whānau [the whole extended family]." Much of my work lately has been about remembering that we all belong, that we already know each other, and that we each have a mission of contribution to share, which often incorporates rebellion and innovation which, perhaps, can be negotiated within our larger social systems if we can be clear and certain.

  • Be the first to comment

Renegotiating Reciprocity - Supporting People with Disabilities in Contribution by Empowering Staff and Re-Focusing Agencies

  1. 1. Helping people with disabilities Form meaningful relationships Aaron Johannes aaron@spectrumsociety.org
  2. 2. Intro / housekeeping • Parking lot • References and documents • Google “imagineacircle” and “diigo” find renegotiating reciprocity • aaron@spectrumsociety.org • Workbook – feel free to use anything, just attribute it back to www.imagineacircle.com • Contact list and Prize!  • Twitter #imagineacircle
  3. 3. intro
  4. 4. Every job there is… • Support 100+ people over 27 years • Every job • I went back to school because I wanted some answers…
  5. 5. Spectrum Consulting. Collaborative: Learning, Research, Press • To increase influence of person centred, individualized options • To start a conversation about agencies and person centred practices
  6. 6. Small Projects
  7. 7. Small Projects
  8. 8. B.C. Family Support Institute Optimal Planning Project with David Wetherow
  9. 9. Small changes: communication that invited partnership and input
  10. 10. I can’t write it but I can draw it
  11. 11. Our Question Together Why does it matter whether we can support people with disabilities to have relationships and be part of their communities?
  12. 12. WHY DO RELATIONSHIPS MATTER? (workbook: 5 reasons)
  13. 13. What sorts of people should be included… and how? Introducing the BMX model of inclusion Erica S. McFadden and Judith A. Snow Participation and presence. O’Brien (1987) describes community presence as “the sharing of the ordinary places that define community life” (p.179), but this simple definition is deceptive. There is a continuum of three notions of presence for an individual that determines the level of inclusion: “being physically present” in a community or at an event; “having presence;” or “actively participating” (Smull & Sanderson, 2001, p. 139). These last two notions of community presence introduce quality of relationships and inter-connectedness (Cummins & Lau, 2003). Being physically present suggests that individuals can often be visitors, and not really part of, community life or have meaningful social contact with others (Ager et al., 2001; Britten, 2001; Smull & Sanderson; Verdonschot, deWitte, Reichrath, Buntix, Curfs, 2009).
  14. 14. Research into Support Networks: The numbers changed…
  15. 15. Story of the red haired girl
  16. 16. “We are not welcome there” • “This might work for your people but our people are harder” • “Our community is less welcoming” • “Our agency doesn’t want to do this” • “We are not allowed to take risks” • “We go to the Friendship Centre every Weds for soup and bannock. No one talks to us. We have to go because the Social Worker says we have to access culturally appropriate activities. When we get there, they start putting all the chairs up on the tables and sweeping up.” • Blind, non-verbal, noisy, drooling, in wheelchairs. • They arrive at 2:45. • Hours: 11:30 – 3. • A table of regulars and the workers at front; they sit in the back. • Staff wearing uniforms. • HUGE bibs, towels. • Didn’t talk to anyone. • Didn’t need anyone. • Had been going for three years. • Manager had never gone with them.
  17. 17. Albert Facilitating belonging
  18. 18. Albert Facilitating belonging • “I’m not sure why they brought you in, this is hopeless. No one will ever want anything to do with him.” • “I’ll just spend some time with him and we’ll find out what he likes.” • “He doesn’t like anything.” • “Watch out for…” • Non-verbal, wheelchair, problematic behaviors, funny loud noises. • Coffee on saturdays at 10:30 a.m. • Late one day, got there at 11 • Volunteer firemen • Physical cues • Changed the schedule • Called him by name, introduced him • Got closer, found reasons to engage • Started inventing reasons why she had to leave • Reasons to need them…
  19. 19. Facilitating belonging • “Albert is wondering can you pass the sugar?” • “Oh, I was going to get a bun and I forgot – is it okay if Albert joins you for a moment? I’ll be right back?” (Chats with staff) • “Darn – Albert and I were looking forward to chatting but I have to take this – would it be an imposition…? I’ll be right back.” • “Oh I’m not sure if you noticed but Albert just nodded at you three times in a row and that means he’s happy to see you!” • “Hey guys, do you mind if we join you?” • “I have this challenge – I wonder if I can run it by you and maybe you have some ideas about what I could do next because I need help.” • “So my job is to help Albert make connections and be included – and I’ve spent a year with him and we have a great time but my boss says he needs to be involved in something… do you have any ideas?”
  20. 20. Back to: “We are not welcome there.” • We go to the Friendship Centre every Weds for soup and bannock. No one talks to us. We have to go because the Social Worker says we have to access culturally appropriate activities. When we get there, they start putting all the chairs up on the tables and sweeping up. • Blind, non-verbal, noisy, drooling, in wheelchairs. • They arrive at 2:45. • Hours: 11:30 – 3. • A table of regulars and the workers at front; they sit in the back. • Staff wearing uniforms. • HUGE bibs, towels. • Didn’t talk to anyone. • Didn’t need anyone. • Had been going for three years. • Manager had never gone with them.
  21. 21. Setting Conditions (“events”) • Manager in an overwhelmed fear state • Staff perceived their sense of self worth from an institutional viewpoint – Orientation – Procedures • We need an hour to change • Measured food portions – Evaluation • Manager and staff: powerless • No values training in 27 years • LOTS of technical training • No mentorship • Isolation • Top down decisions imposed on them • “We know the name of the dog next door…”
  22. 22. Connected with aboriginal Social Worker • Introduced to Friendship Centre staff • Changed the time of their visit • Started helping • Wore street clothes • Rethought bibs etc. • One was long lost 3rd cousin • Got introduced to other family • Reconnected with tribe • A year later invited to Pow Wow, stayed all week • Cousins came to planning meeting • Social Worker: they still hate you but it’s a good thing 
  23. 23. Chester Finn “They get to know you. And, you know, they can’t help but be involved.” Berkeley University, Oral Histories of Self Advocate Leaders
  24. 24. Moving from a delusion of introduction to statements & assumptions of belonging “Who do you know?”
  25. 25. Moving from a delusion of introduction to statements & assumptions of belonging
  26. 26. Skating together: incongruent mission and protocols
  27. 27. Incongruence: asking what’s wanted… PARENTS: A circle of friends Watching over him Including him in activities Expanding his range of things he likes Available in emergencies Playing cards Hiking Camping PERSON: “I want someone to go hiking with on Thursday afternoons, who will not talk…” Turned into going for coffee Going to movies Going for dinner Going to church Coming to planning meetings
  28. 28. The goal might be way more simple than we think…
  29. 29. How hard is it to make friends?
  30. 30. Prom Dress
  31. 31. Amanda and limo
  32. 32. Amanda and cupcakes
  33. 33. Amanda and cupcakes
  34. 34. Pay it forward: Fort St. John
  35. 35. 2nd Anniversary
  36. 36. WORKBOOK: THANKS!
  37. 37. Slideshare “Out of the Day Program”
  38. 38. Part 2: ROLE OF SUPPORTS
  39. 39. Which do you choose?
  40. 40. “You bust it we fix it” “If your pipes ain’t flowing and your air ain’t blowing call us”
  41. 41. Mind Maps
  42. 42. Who are we?
  43. 43. Rebels
  44. 44. What would your business card look like?
  45. 45. • Research on support networks for people with disabilities changed significantly in the 80s… • Why do you think? • Paid folks are often at the edge of the circle – economic reciprocity… • Christmas story… • Socialised to denigration.
  46. 46. “A person’s needs are best met by people whose needs are met.” Jean Clark
  47. 47. wordles
  48. 48. A Word-Cloud takes the most frequent word choices and makes them appear bigger: it’s a way to tell graphically what matters.
  49. 49. “Progress: Limited or Unlimited” 1958 Minnesota Planning Documents for Transitions to Community from Institutions.
  50. 50. Michael Kendrick: “Life Giving Values”
  51. 51. John Lord: “Principles of the New Story”
  52. 52. David Pitonyak: “Who Holds Your Story?”
  53. 53. Aaron Johannes: “Aspects of Self-Governance: Three Stories of Women With Disabilities”
  54. 54. 3 vision statements from organizations
  55. 55. 3 Public Job Postings from Anonymous Agencies in B.C.
  56. 56. Employee Code of Conduct
  57. 57. Community Support Worker Job Description
  58. 58. wordles
  59. 59. So, what is your role? Training for independence Health and safety Build relationships Documentation Manage the budget Community connector Be a positive role model Advocacy Companionship Personal care Job training Housekeeping Behavior management Liaise with professionals Person centred planning Be a friend Be professional Family support Maintain CARF standards
  60. 60. How does it feel to have a gift & find a community where it’s appreciated? Does this happen at work?
  61. 61. Solution Circles
  62. 62. Albert’s story
  63. 63. Instructional Strategies The dictionary defines instruction as a “precept” (the teaching of something known about our culture), as “direction calling for compliance,” as “an outline or manual of technical procedure,” and “the action, practice, or profession of teaching.” Often parents, community support workers, coaches, peers, managers and others find themselves with instructional responsibilities – to teach someone to cook independently, or cross the street, or engage in a social conversation, yet don’t have the information they need about how to think through goals and outcomes and break things down into teachable bits in ways that work for the particular individual. The next step in community based instruction is teaching for independence, so that we can prompt less and people can acquire mastery and self- esteem. We can gather many concrete examples as well as walking through logical progressions of how someone learns a skillset and how the instructor removes herself from the interaction.
  64. 64. EMBEDDING PRACTICES
  65. 65. "[I]t is from the relational matrix that the very possibility of individual sense making comes into being, and without the existence of ongoing relationship communicative acts lose their status as communication." Kenneth Gergen – 'Dialogue: Life and Death of the Organization’ Resources: www.taosinstitute.net
  66. 66. Starbucks Guy “We are now furiously improvising our way through a situations for which there is no script and if you are an amazing jazz musician then improv is great, but if you’re like the rest of us it can kind of feel like a crisis.” Jennifer Senior, “For Parents, Happiness is a very High Bar.” (TEDtalks, youtube)
  67. 67. “Without clarity, people will start making up stuff… often the stuff they make up has to do with them not getting ‘into trouble’”
  68. 68. How do Adults learn? • Staff • Folks we support
  69. 69. Concierge Learning – Jane Hart
  70. 70. “Have you ever really had a teacher? One who saw you as a raw but precious thing, a jewel that, with wisdom, could be polished to a proud shine?” Mitch Albom
  71. 71. How do we teach? Paulo Freire and co-learning
  72. 72. “Power gets the job: Priming power improves interview outcomes.” Lammersa, Duboisb, Ruckerc, Galinskyd PRIMING: think of a time When you had power. No “priming” = 47% Priming = 68% Low in power = 26%
  73. 73. We are always somewhere on the steps…
  74. 74. Liz
  75. 75. Captain Grace Hopper
  76. 76. Small and Viral Changes • Small projects • Small changes
  77. 77. Planning = 99.59% success • WORKBOOK • What changes will you make / manifest – To agency? – To agency leaders? – To family leaders? – To staff? – To folks supported?
  78. 78. Cousin Dan the Handy-man
  79. 79. WORKBOOK: HOW WILL WE BE TOGETHER?
  80. 80. An open reading of Waddie Welcome and the Beloved Community
  81. 81. How might we do this?
  82. 82. Winterbourne. June 2011 “We suggest a redefinition of the role of the service and support organizations. Rather than solely providing services and support, organizations serve as bridges between people and community supports. For this reason, the concepts and research findings associated with social capital contribute to a reformulation of organizational role.” • Nunkoosing, Karl and Haydon- Laurelut, Mark. “The Relational Basis of Empowerment.” Eds: John O’Brien and Simon Duffy. The Centre for Welfare Reform in association with the University of Portsmouth, The Need for Roots series. July 2013.
  83. 83. Making a Plan • 3 Insights • 3 Intentions
  84. 84. WORKBOOK: Belonging and Community Zine
  85. 85. Unexpected gifts
  86. 86. Questions?

×