Technology Trends on the Horizon: Where Learning is Headed

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  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
  • Simplicity and Power are inherently at odds with one another, how to overcome?\n\nTying back the Cynefin framework a little bit, we don’t have to choose between simplicity and power. We simply need to refocus at different scales. \n\nCore Design Tenants\n\n---simplest case,  get somebody up and running 8-8, 8 pages and less than 8 hours\n---enable complexity for those who want it, but hide it from those who don't need it\n---put burden of complexity on those most able to handle it and those who need it\n---remove constraints of traditional SCORM\n---backwards compatibility where it makes sense\n---make it human readable\n
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  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
  • Imagine in the very near future a teacher sitting down at her computer or mobile device and looking for compelling educational content to help her teach the Bill of Rights to her 11th grade general education class. With a couple of key strokes, she calls up a list of choices, targeted to her specific students’ needs and leveled to her state’s standards. She sorts the list by ratings and finds half a dozen five star lessons (as determined by hundreds of high school history teachers around the country), each with dozens of reviews, and even statistics as to how effective these lessons were, as measured by online quizzes given by teachers around the country. In minutes, our teacher reviews the five choices, picks the one that she senses will work best with her kids, downloads it and includes it in her lesson plan for the following week. Importantly, her actions and anonymous profile (e.g. 11th grade teacher) will be captured automatically, so that that data adds to the growing collection of information about that specific educational element.\n\nThat is the vision of the Learning Registry and it to uses technologies much the same way as Facebook and Tin Can use activity streams.\n
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  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • When you graduate high school, you get a diploma. When you pass your state’s driving test, you get a driver’s license. When you graduate college, you get a degree. There are Google Certified Teachers, Apple Distinguished Educators…\n\nHow are your skills recognized outside of a standardized curriculum? What evidence can you show of your mastery of any non-traditional competency?\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • How do you know that any of this is true? You could ask around about the organizations I belong to. You could put me in a situation that would test my Spanish abilities…\n\nIf you needed SCORM skills on your team, would you know enough to assess whether I did or not? How do we know – and how do we differentiate apprentices from journeymen from masters in skills that are so relatively new and niche that we hardly recognize them out of context? This is what badges will help to do.\n\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
  • I am a second-generation Eagle Scout (yes, my dad is an Eagle Scout, too). If you are wholly unfamiliar with how Boy Scouts works, let’s just say that statistically only one out of every hundred scouts ever becomes an Eagle Scout. It’s the highest rank one can achieve in the program and the body of work required, independent of the board of review to be accepted for that rank, is significant for any youth. I share this background because it’s important to the construct of understanding how badges and rank fits together.\n\nThere are many people who are starting to pick up on the idea of badges for education, and there are many perspectives grounded in their experiences.  If you’re a fan of what Foursquare and other gamification approaches to badges, then it’s simply a rewards or achievements layer that you slap on top of an existing experience. \n\nThe Boy Scout model for badges worked as part of a larger strategic design for a whole person with a certain stance at the end of their experience. Stay with me here. Merit badges were/are focused on key skills. The badges represented an evidenced level of proficiency/mastery (argue your points in the comments) — evidenced by a subject matter expert who was your coach in that domain. These were not necessarily your Scout leaders. These were people in the community recognized to sign off on your proficiency. The badge is a recognition of that milestone.\n\nMerit badges were introduced to Boy Scouts around the rank of First Class. There are many ranks to Scouting, and each one represents a certain amount of maturity in the overall curriculum — not unlike a grade level. Do you see where I’m going here? Each successive rank is harder and harder to earn because the work and the dedication involved increases. The system was designed to shape a young man to develop a core set of values (say it with me Scouts: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent). The merit badges provided the curricular areas of focus for skill building, but the values are reinforced throughout the attainment of the badges, and the awarding of a new rank was recognition of the maturation of the Scout in their overall development. Badges are part of it, and there are subjective evaluations, as well.\n
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  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
  • It recognizes that the adaptive stance we’re looking to instill in people is something that organizations value because people who can adapt can find ways for organizations large and small to win.\n\n
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  • Technology Trends on the Horizon: Where Learning is Headed

    1. 1. ( ) Technology Trends on the Horizon: Where eLearning is Headed Aaron E. Silvers, Chief Learning Officer - Problem Solutions, Contracted to Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) November 3, 2011
    2. 2. ( The Horizon What powers eLearning tomorrow builds on today’s technology, developing a learner’s adaptive stance. )
    3. 3. ( What I want for you... ) ⊛ Take notes, tweet, share your questions. ⊛ Follow up on anything you find relevant. ⊛ Ask your service providers and vendors about how they’ll help you keep up with these trends.
    4. 4. ( Prologue )
    5. 5. ( Pubs, Tea Houses & Coffeeshops Diverse groups and individuals get together, co-mingle and work. )
    6. 6. ( Things made in Coffeeshops... Electricity )
    7. 7. ( The Insurance Industry )
    8. 8. ( Modern Democracy )
    9. 9. ( The Eagle and Child )
    10. 10. ( The Inklings )
    11. 11. ( Self- Organizing Networks Opportunities for serendipity in ) such spaces reflect how our brains create new connections.
    12. 12. ( Higher Orders of Reuse #trend: Reusing (and repurposing) entire technologies )
    13. 13. ( Mash-up Artists Repurposing/remixing are trends ) of reuse that span 50 years of recorded music.
    14. 14. ( The Beach Boys were pioneers. )
    15. 15. ( Brian Eno & David Byrne took it to another level. )
    16. 16. ( Recontextualized In each of these examples, ) artists take a sound that has meaning on its own and recontextualize it to produce a new musical experience. This is a metaphor for the trends in eLearning.
    17. 17. ( Social Business The interplay of work and learning. )
    18. 18. ( Organization Charts (ugh...) )
    19. 19. ( Alfred Chandler Chandler developed & promoted ) the concept of management hierarchy in the workplace: “Hierarchical structure increases productivity, lowers cost.”
    20. 20. Productivity Cost
    21. 21. Productivity Cost( )
    22. 22. Productivity Cost 100( ) 75 50 25 0 0 20 40 60 80 100
    23. 23. Productivity Cost
    24. 24. ( My Point... )
    25. 25. ( My Point... ) Complex Simple
    26. 26. ( My Point... ) Complex Complicated Simple
    27. 27. ( My Point... ) Complex Complicated Chaos Simple
    28. 28. ( Chaos Complex My Point... Simple To Complicatedw p-D ith o fe wn w /n Or o ga co n nd iza iti tio on n s )
    29. 29. ( Chaos Complex My Point... Simple w To Complicated To ithw p-D p- m ith o Do a fe wn w ny w n co /n Or O n o ga rg d co n an itio nd iza iza ns iti tio tio on n n s )
    30. 30. Se lf- O rg ani ( zin g Chaos Complex My Point... Simple w To Complicated To ithw p-D p- m ith o Do a fe wn w ny w n co /n Or O n o ga rg d co n an itio nd iza iza ns iti tio tio on n n s )
    31. 31. ( Communities Powered by Content #trend )
    32. 32. ( Elements of Content- Powered Communities ⊛ Content as a Service (CaaS) ) ⊛ Repositories (Content Servers) Content ⊛ Authoritative Versions (“Latest & Greatest”) ⊛ Better Interfaces ⊛ APIs ⊛ Metadata ⊛ Social Metadata ⊛ Learner data
    33. 33. ( Elements of Content- Powered Communities Community ) ⊛ Social Learning with Collaborative Structure ⊛ Frictionless Experiences ⊛ Search, Discovery and Suggestion ⊛ Semantic Analysis ⊛ Powerful Analytics
    34. 34. ( What does this mean to you? What if you already have a big implemenation? What if you’re working now on requirements? )
    35. 35. Legacy Next Generation( ) Data Model Activity Streams JavaScript API Web Services Intelligent Tutoring, Sequencing & Navigation Suggestion Engines Registries, Repositories Registries & Repositories powering Content as a Service
    36. 36. Legacy SCORM Legacy Next Generation( ) Data Model Activity Streams JavaScript API Web Services Intelligent Tutoring, Sequencing & Navigation Suggestion Engines Registries, Repositories Registries & Repositories powering Content as a Service
    37. 37. Legacy SCORM Next Generation SCORM Legacy Next Generation( ) Data Model Activity Streams JavaScript API Web Services Intelligent Tutoring, Sequencing & Navigation Suggestion Engines Registries, Repositories Registries & Repositories powering Content as a Service
    38. 38. ( What is Business Asking For? ) ⊛ Communities mediated through technology. ⊛ Content intelligently suggested in context of community activity. ⊛ “Frictionless” experiences that span multiple devices, tools and situations. ⊛ Robust analytics tying online activities to performance metrics.
    39. 39. ( Rolling Your Own: Open Source Community Platforms ) ⊛ Drupal Commons ⊛ BuddyPress ⊛ World Economic ⊛ GigaOM Forum ⊛ Virginia Tech Carilion ⊛ Turner Broadcasting School of Medicine ⊛ Nvidia ⊛ MSU School of Journalism ⊛ Symantec ⊛ CUNY Academic Commons ⊛ Amplify
    40. 40. ( Chaordic Models: Self-Organized & “Organized” )
    41. 41. ( Chaordic Models: Self-Organized & “Organized” )
    42. 42. ( Chaordic Models: Self-Organized & “Organized” )
    43. 43. ( Chaordic Models: Self-Organized & “Organized” )
    44. 44. ( The Mash-Up ⊛ Talent Management Systems that marry ) experience with content and performance data ⊛ eCommerce systems that subtly recommend products as customer service and sales tools analyze customer-facing communications ⊛ Competency systems that coach young leaders in their electronic communications with direct reports, partners and stakeholders. ⊛ These services can extend existing platforms (some assembly required).
    45. 45. ( Augmented Reality: Performance in-Place #trend )
    46. 46. ( It’s About Performance... )
    47. 47. ( It’s About Performance... The Power of Planograms )
    48. 48. ( ...And It’s In Your Hands )
    49. 49. ( )
    50. 50. ( ) Digital Graffiti
    51. 51. ( ) Animated Terrain
    52. 52. ( ...And It’s In Your Hands )
    53. 53. ( How does Augmented Reality Fit In? ) ⊛ It’s performance support. ⊛ It’s a vehicle for coaching-in-context. ⊛ It’s a canvas for immersive learning experiences.
    54. 54. ( How to Play Today... ARIS is a platform built for Augmented Reality & Interactive Storytelling. )
    55. 55. ( Analytics Change Everything #trend )
    56. 56. ( )
    57. 57. ( )
    58. 58. ( Activity Streams: The Hotness )
    59. 59. ( )
    60. 60. ( Simplicity Power )
    61. 61. I Did This
    62. 62. ( I Did This )
    63. 63. I Did This
    64. 64. Noun Verb Object
    65. 65. ( Noun Verb Object )
    66. 66. Noun Verb Object
    67. 67. ( Social Metadata: How People Use Stuff ) ⊛ Activity Streams, as just one example... ⊛ Highlight people and how they use stuff. ⊛ Highlight how “stuff” gets used.
    68. 68. ( The Learning Registry )
    69. 69. ( What Will it Mean for Your Company? ) ⊛ Document Management ⊛ Knowledge Management ⊛ Project Management ⊛ Mergers & Acquisitions ⊛ Legal...
    70. 70. ( What Will This Mean For You? ) ⊛ Data-driven decisions about continuous improvment. ⊛ You and I will both see how I’m developing and performing.
    71. 71. ( Badges for Competencies #trend )
    72. 72. ( LinkedIn )
    73. 73. ( Badges: Scouting > Gamification )
    74. 74. ( Badges for New Skills ⊛ Young learners from disenfranchised ) communities who participate in hackfest competitions demonstrate a mastery of engineering robotics, but no high school diploma. ⊛ Web developers soak up O’Reilly texts, coursework from P2PU, but lack enrollment in an accredited institution. ⊛ Entrepreneurs generating $950K in revenue audit all online courses from a state school but lack the degree credential required to be approved as a mentor in a university program.
    75. 75. ( What Does It Mean for Your Company? ) ⊛ Captures and translates what employees know and learn across contexts. ⊛ Encourages participation tethered to results. ⊛ Formalizes and enhances social aspects of interest-driven learning. ⊛ The processes and practices that make your company great can be formalized and adopted by your customers, partners and stakeholders.
    76. 76. ( Wrapping Things Up )
    77. 77. ( Trends on the Horizon ⊛ Content Powered Communities ) ⊛ Next Generation SCORM ⊛ Augmented Reality: Performance-in-Place ⊛ A means for creating immersive learning experiences ⊛ Analytics Change Everything ⊛ Project Tin Can & Learning Registry ⊛ Badges for Competencies ⊛ Mozilla Badges
    78. 78. ( Cheers! ) ⊛ Aaron E. Silvers ⊛ Chief Learning Officer, Problem Solutions ⊛ Contracted to Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) ⊛ http://adlnet.gov/ ⊛ @ADL_Initiative ⊛ aaron.silvers.ctr@adlnet.gov ⊛ @aaronesilvers ⊛ http://about.me/aaronesilvers

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