27 STRATEGIESFOR OPTIMAL WELL BEINGIN OUR BRILLIANT INTENSE AND     ASYNCHORNOUS KIDS
P. SUSAN JACKSONDAIMON INSTITUTE  While Rock, B.C., Canada   daimoninstitute@shaw.ca
DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices   311/30/2012
11/30/2012BY WAY OF PREAMBLE . . .                4
WHY 27? the highest level of knowledge in              rupaloke (Buddhism)Pythagoras and Plato number 3 inthe cubed (ie 27...
For the first time in history we have access to all of the collectedaccumulated information about human consciousness and ...
Is a complex  discipline-transcendent phenomena
11/30/2012   8
THERE IS A DOMINANT UNDERSTANDING OF GIFTEDNESS        AS A PURELY ACADEMIC ASPECT OF LIFE
Giftedness is a greater awareness, a greater sensitivity, and a greater ability to understand and transform perceptions in...
Giftedness is A way of being that encompasses the whole body and life; a way of experiencing the world, of moving, thinkin...
THIS GIFTED CHILD                   Rage and capacity to learn                          Idiosyncrasies                 Ext...
DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG   11/30/2012   13
Developmental                        lines operate There are many        independently  developmental       of each other ...
Development moves from less aware (and capable) to increasingly self-aware  (more deeply conscious) as the gifted child as...
Gifted children are endowed with the most amazing radar for their owndevelopment : a sixth sense that informs them both ab...
1. WHOLE PERSON FIRSTBefore academics, before talent development …
2. ALL IN IT TOGETHER
20DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG        11/30/2012
3. HUMOUR   HUMOURHUMOUR, ALWAYS  HUMOUR . . .
XKCD COMICS Humor allows man to create perspective, to put distance between  himself and whatever may confront him. Humor ...
4. GET TO KNOW THE IDIOSYNCRASIES OF YOUR CHILD                     Personality Type:     Extravert or Introvert? Intuitiv...
24   The judging   types believe that life should  be willed and decided, while  the perceptivetypes regard lifeas somethi...
We know that each gifted child is an extraordinary gestalt. Inthis, the sum of the parts far exceeds the individual weight...
Know the childESSE EST PERCIPI (TO BE IS TO BE  PERCEIVED).
5. LEARN EVERYTHING YOU                            CAN ABOUT GIFTEDNESS BUT10 More Websites for Parents of Gifted & Talent...
6. HONE AND ALWAYS TRUSTYOUR INTUITION, YOUR GUT
7. BE WILLING TO LOOK AT YOURSELF,   AT LEAST A LITTLE
Your children and the act ofparenting is an invitation to a dance            of discovery.
ADULT GIFTEDNESS "Giftedness was not commonly identified in  children until recently, so many adults areunaware that they ...
CHARACTERISTICS OFTEN EXPERIENCED BY GIFTED INDIVIDUALS      Are you a good problem solver? Can you concentrate for long p...
Many gifted adults do not live and work in   an atmosphere of understanding andsupport that allows them to feel valued and...
9. Change begins with awareness:1. What are three things that you were fascinated by as   a child?2. Think of an experienc...
35     11/30/2012
THERE IS A WAY BETWEEN VOICE ANDPRESENCE WHERE INFORMATION FLOWS. IN     DISCIPLINED SILENCE IT OPENS. WITH             WA...
11. State ofmind  Whatever you are  doing, ask  yourself, “What’s  the state of my  mind?”   Dalai Lama, 1999 11/30/2012  ...
Neuroscience: Mindfulness Meditation• Texas Tech University scientist studying                           integrative body-...
12. BITE OFF WHAT YOU CAN  CHEW AND FIND A TEAM
13. ALWAYS ALWAYS LISTEN TO    AND TRUST YOUR CHILD           But….
13. NEVER EVER MAKE YOUR GIFTED CHILD   THE EPICENTER: THEY KNOW BETTER
FIVE KEY ELEMENTS OF MINDFUL COMMUNICATION                                 42                     Choose the right time.  ...
ALWAYS REMEMBER RULE 3. HUMOUR                HUMOUR, HUMOUR,                 ALWAYS HUMOUR     To be playful and serious ...
DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG   11/30/2012   44
11/30/2012        14. PLAN FOR A LIFESTYLE that aims to develop many aspectsof your gifted child and your family          ...
BALANCE IN ALL THINGS         46
47
48     BALANCE IN ALL THINGS
DABROWSKI, 1972                                           49  ...she should be given assistance in       her education, ab...
15. REST, QUIET TIME, NATURE AND NOODLING ARE ALL ESSENTIAL
16. GOOD SLEEP IS RESTORATIVE      Clean, clutter-free space to sleep in                    Fresh air                 No s...
17. RESPONSIBILITY, AUTONOMY AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT   • All members of the family participate in family life     • Each...
18. SUPPORTING THE LEARNING                       NEEDSEvery gift contains a danger. Whatever gift we have we are compelle...
19. APPROACH ADVOCACY AS A WIN~WIN1. Assume everyone is doing the best they can2. May be well informed; May be ignorant3. ...
20. HELP YOUR CHILD DEVELOP THE NON-          ACADEMIC SIDE OF LIFEPeople with good emotional health are aware of their th...
Gifted childrenprone tocognicentricism . All gifted kids need to beencouraged, taught andreinforced for payingattention to...
intelligentlife          Flexible              attunement              to who we are,              who we are             ...
Emotionsare specificentities andprecisemessengersfrom theinstinctiveself               58
EMOTIONAL LITERACY IS THE FOUNDATION OF        GOOD MENTAL HEALTH             59
 We need to get to know our emotions Pay attention to them and honor them, however subtle Do not name them like street ...
Emotions arenecessaryexpressionsof what areperhapsunspeakableinner truths           61
Give kids room to simply experience a feeling, in the rightcontext. Can we model this, even a little, according to our    ...
 Places them into simplistic categories Based on early socialization about which   emotions are right, wrong, acceptable ...
22. Affordopportunities toplay, to compete,in structured andunstructuredforums                    64
23. Ω                                                        : anytime, anywhere:Stop and Think: Begin by interrupting you...
1.      What happens in your body when you think about _______?2.      What happens in your body when you are ____________...
25. Understand the                        1. increased cerebral blood flowphysiological effects      and oxygen to the bra...
• Aerobic exercise  program  decreases  depression and is  as effective as  clinical trials with  anti-depressant  medicat...
Part of the routines of life:walking, biking to school, breaksin screen timeMartial artsDance of all kindsNature walks, hi...
Nutritional neuroscience is one of the hottest   areas of current scientific investigation    Regrettably most clinical me...
Brain Food• The most powerful tool we have to change our brain  function and overall health is our forks!• Food is NOT jus...
“The modern                                                     Western diet is                                           ...
Environmental factors contribute to this                          downturn:   1. Breakdown in traditional family supports ...
•   Water mainstay of liquid (juice becomes the treat)•   Eliminate or reduce significantly foods high in fat and sugar: e...
SCREEN TIMEThe costs of excessive screen time are tooenormous to ignore. They include•   poor school performance• childhoo...
LIMIT SCREEN TIME AND AFFORD OTHER OPTIONS  •School-age children spend nearly twice as many hours with screen media  (tele...
27. LIMIT SCREEN TIME AND AFFORD OTHER                  OPTIONS1.Craft & Puppet Night-2.Host a family game night-3.Kids in...
27 strategies by Sue Jackson of Damien Institute
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

27 strategies by Sue Jackson of Damien Institute

3,341 views

Published on

Slideshow from a presentation I attended.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,341
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
132
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

27 strategies by Sue Jackson of Damien Institute

  1. 1. 27 STRATEGIESFOR OPTIMAL WELL BEINGIN OUR BRILLIANT INTENSE AND ASYNCHORNOUS KIDS
  2. 2. P. SUSAN JACKSONDAIMON INSTITUTE While Rock, B.C., Canada daimoninstitute@shaw.ca
  3. 3. DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 311/30/2012
  4. 4. 11/30/2012BY WAY OF PREAMBLE . . . 4
  5. 5. WHY 27? the highest level of knowledge in rupaloke (Buddhism)Pythagoras and Plato number 3 inthe cubed (ie 27) and number 2 in the cubed (ie, 8) represent the Cosmos. 5
  6. 6. For the first time in history we have access to all of the collectedaccumulated information about human consciousness and itspotential (in which the concept of giftedness is nested) 6
  7. 7. Is a complex discipline-transcendent phenomena
  8. 8. 11/30/2012 8
  9. 9. THERE IS A DOMINANT UNDERSTANDING OF GIFTEDNESS AS A PURELY ACADEMIC ASPECT OF LIFE
  10. 10. Giftedness is a greater awareness, a greater sensitivity, and a greater ability to understand and transform perceptions into i ntellectual and emotional experiences. Giftedness isAnnemarie Roeper a greater awareness, a greater sensitivity, and a greater ability to understand and transform perceptions into i ntellectual and emotional experiences. Annemarie Roeper GIFTEDNESS Annemarie Roeper
  11. 11. Giftedness is A way of being that encompasses the whole body and life; a way of experiencing the world, of moving, thinking, and creating that is fundamentally different from the typically accepted human experience
  12. 12. THIS GIFTED CHILD Rage and capacity to learn Idiosyncrasies Extraordinary creative capacity Wonder and awe Fierceness Intensity Sensitivity Staggering Insight Fearsome will Anticipation Imaginative Playful Depth Complexity Doggedness Single-mindedness Other worldliness Capacity for advanced morality Capacity for great awarenessCapacity for advanced development in many spheres of experience Develop in wild leaps and in uncommon ways 12
  13. 13. DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG 11/30/2012 13
  14. 14. Developmental lines operate There are many independently developmental of each other atlines operative in different rates any individual with a different dynamic and on a different time schedule is the seat of consciousness: its capacity and function determines the workings of any individual 15
  15. 15. Development moves from less aware (and capable) to increasingly self-aware (more deeply conscious) as the gifted child ascends to greater capacity and awareness. 16
  16. 16. Gifted children are endowed with the most amazing radar for their owndevelopment : a sixth sense that informs them both about the world around themand their inner world. This is not limited to the obvious and the known. Instead it revels in possibilities and, in optimal circumstances, operates with surety and confidence, even in discovery and exploration.This vital force directs life and growth to become all the child is capable of being , and needs to be nurtured, respected and fully supported. P. Susan Jackson Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted
  17. 17. 1. WHOLE PERSON FIRSTBefore academics, before talent development …
  18. 18. 2. ALL IN IT TOGETHER
  19. 19. 20DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG 11/30/2012
  20. 20. 3. HUMOUR HUMOURHUMOUR, ALWAYS HUMOUR . . .
  21. 21. XKCD COMICS Humor allows man to create perspective, to put distance between himself and whatever may confront him. Humor allows man todetach himself from himself and thereby retain the fullest possible control over himself. Viktor Frankl
  22. 22. 4. GET TO KNOW THE IDIOSYNCRASIES OF YOUR CHILD Personality Type: Extravert or Introvert? Intuitive or grounded processor? Makes sense through logic or through feeling? Closer or endless Processor?
  23. 23. 24 The judging types believe that life should be willed and decided, while the perceptivetypes regard lifeas something to be experiencedand understood UNDERSTANDING AND RESPECTING DIFFERENCES
  24. 24. We know that each gifted child is an extraordinary gestalt. Inthis, the sum of the parts far exceeds the individual weight and power of any single dimension of the developing child.
  25. 25. Know the childESSE EST PERCIPI (TO BE IS TO BE PERCEIVED).
  26. 26. 5. LEARN EVERYTHING YOU CAN ABOUT GIFTEDNESS BUT10 More Websites for Parents of Gifted & Talentedhttp://brooklyn.about.com/od/Brooklyn-Public-School-K-to-12/a/10-More-Websites-For-Parents-Of-Gifted-And-Talented-Kids-From-Us-Doe.htmKids, from US DOEAGATE :a New York State statewide nonprofit organization of concerned parents andeducators.National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC)Hoagies Gifted Education Page is a resource guide: "resources on nearly every aspect ofgifted education available on the Internet," .National Parent Information Network (NPIN) general research and information, administeredby the National Library of Education and the U.S. Department of Education.The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC): a professional organization: "improving educationaloutcomes for those with exceptionalities, students with disabilities, and gifted."Parental SupportGT World : a n on-line support community for parents of gifted and talented kids.Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG) focuses primarily on role of adults in thelives of gifted children. It "provides information on identification, guidance, and effective waysto live and work with gifted individuals."Gifted Development Center serves parents, schools, and advocacy groups with information aboutidentification, assessment, counseling, learning styles, programs, presentations, and resources forgifted children and adults.
  27. 27. 6. HONE AND ALWAYS TRUSTYOUR INTUITION, YOUR GUT
  28. 28. 7. BE WILLING TO LOOK AT YOURSELF, AT LEAST A LITTLE
  29. 29. Your children and the act ofparenting is an invitation to a dance of discovery.
  30. 30. ADULT GIFTEDNESS "Giftedness was not commonly identified in children until recently, so many adults areunaware that they were gifted as children. Buteven those who were identified tend to believetheir giftedness disappeared before adulthood .
  31. 31. CHARACTERISTICS OFTEN EXPERIENCED BY GIFTED INDIVIDUALS Are you a good problem solver? Can you concentrate for long periods of time? Are you perfectionistic? Do you persevere with your interests? Are you an avid reader? Do you have a vivid imagination? Do you enjoy doing jigsaw puzzles? Often connect seemingly unrelated ideas? Do you enjoy paradoxes? Do you set high standards for yourself ? Do you have a good long-term memory? Are you deeply compassionate? Do you have persistent curiosity? Do you have an excellent sense of humor? Are you a keen observer? Do you have a love of mathematics? Do you need periods of contemplation? Do you search for meaning in life?Are you aware of things that others are not? Are you fascinated by words? Are you highly sensitive? Do you have strong moral convictions? Do you often feel out-of-sync with others? Are you perceptive or insightful? Do you often question authority?Do you have organized collections? Do you thrive on challenge? Do you have extraordinary abilities and deficits? Do you learn new things rapidly? Feel overwhelmed by many interests/abilities? Do you have a great energy? Often take a stand against injustice? Do you feel driven by your creativity? Love ideas and ardent discussion?Were you advanced developmentally in childhood? Have unusual ideas or perceptions? Are you a complex person?
  32. 32. Many gifted adults do not live and work in an atmosphere of understanding andsupport that allows them to feel valued and to make full use of their talents. Mary-Elaine Jacobsen*[Advanced Development, Volume 8, 1999] Her book: The Gifted Adult: A Revolutionary Guide for Liberating Everyday Genius
  33. 33. 9. Change begins with awareness:1. What are three things that you were fascinated by as a child?2. Think of an experience you had as a child where your intelligence and/or insight was totally overlooked or disregarded . . .3. Did you have a role in your family that was expected and reinforced but may not have reflected your true nature?
  34. 34. 35 11/30/2012
  35. 35. THERE IS A WAY BETWEEN VOICE ANDPRESENCE WHERE INFORMATION FLOWS. IN DISCIPLINED SILENCE IT OPENS. WITH WANDERING TALK IT CLOSES. - RUMI
  36. 36. 11. State ofmind Whatever you are doing, ask yourself, “What’s the state of my mind?” Dalai Lama, 1999 11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 37
  37. 37. Neuroscience: Mindfulness Meditation• Texas Tech University scientist studying integrative body-mind training (IBMT) – confirmed and expanded on changes in structural efficiency of white matter in the brain related to positive behavioral changes in subjects practicing the technique for a month and a minimum of 11 hours total.• "When we got the results, we all got very excited because all of the other training exercises, like working-memory training or computer-based training, only have been shown to change myelination," Tang said. We found a different pattern of neural plasticity induced by the training."11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 38
  38. 38. 12. BITE OFF WHAT YOU CAN CHEW AND FIND A TEAM
  39. 39. 13. ALWAYS ALWAYS LISTEN TO AND TRUST YOUR CHILD But….
  40. 40. 13. NEVER EVER MAKE YOUR GIFTED CHILD THE EPICENTER: THEY KNOW BETTER
  41. 41. FIVE KEY ELEMENTS OF MINDFUL COMMUNICATION 42 Choose the right time. Choose the right place. Remove distractions Be clear. Make it clear what youre wishing to convey from theoutset. For example, your purpose could be to inform others, obtain information or initiate action. Organize and clarify ideas in your mind.
  42. 42. ALWAYS REMEMBER RULE 3. HUMOUR HUMOUR, HUMOUR, ALWAYS HUMOUR To be playful and serious at the same time is possible and defines the ideal mental condition. John Dewey Stress and humor must exist in order to createthe dynamic force that propels the human animal. It is in learning to accept and utilize both, that people are able to advance beyond the fear of living and find the joy of life. Dan Holt
  43. 43. DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG 11/30/2012 44
  44. 44. 11/30/2012 14. PLAN FOR A LIFESTYLE that aims to develop many aspectsof your gifted child and your family 45 DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG
  45. 45. BALANCE IN ALL THINGS 46
  46. 46. 47
  47. 47. 48 BALANCE IN ALL THINGS
  48. 48. DABROWSKI, 1972 49 ...she should be given assistance in her education, above all self- development, which should aim at positive, perhaps acceleratedgrowth...Of fundamental value, also, would be the formation of deeper intellectual capacities which would bring discrimination into the emotional and moral aspects of herlife. Of great importance would be a friendly...interest taken in her total development...... In this connection, it might be essentialto discover and develop some of her more important interests and abilities.
  49. 49. 15. REST, QUIET TIME, NATURE AND NOODLING ARE ALL ESSENTIAL
  50. 50. 16. GOOD SLEEP IS RESTORATIVE Clean, clutter-free space to sleep in Fresh air No stimulants Comfort itemsTime to decompress before actual sleeping time Every child needs different amounts of sleep Every child helps maintain their space
  51. 51. 17. RESPONSIBILITY, AUTONOMY AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT • All members of the family participate in family life • Each according to his capacity to contribute • Provide opportunities to engage new capacities • Model and allow for growth through risk taking and experiencing consequences • Order, clean spaces and systems for maintenance all essential
  52. 52. 18. SUPPORTING THE LEARNING NEEDSEvery gift contains a danger. Whatever gift we have we are compelled toexpress. And if the expression of that gift is blocked, distorted, or merely allowed to languish, then the gift turns against us, and we suffer. – L. Johnson
  53. 53. 19. APPROACH ADVOCACY AS A WIN~WIN1. Assume everyone is doing the best they can2. May be well informed; May be ignorant3. May be limited by biases or filters that interfere with perception and communication4. May lack the resources or the confidence to engage effectively5. Find common ground and strengths FIRST6. Do your research: funds, philosophy, practice7. Involve your child always8. Choose specific goals for each meeting: limits are essential as is the big picture9. Start with those on the front line and build relationships throughout the system
  54. 54. 20. HELP YOUR CHILD DEVELOP THE NON- ACADEMIC SIDE OF LIFEPeople with good emotional health are aware of their thoughts, feelings and behaviours. 55
  55. 55. Gifted childrenprone tocognicentricism . All gifted kids need to beencouraged, taught andreinforced for payingattention to andcherishing their physicalbody11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 56
  56. 56. intelligentlife Flexible attunement to who we are, who we are becoming and where we find ourselves. 57
  57. 57. Emotionsare specificentities andprecisemessengersfrom theinstinctiveself 58
  58. 58. EMOTIONAL LITERACY IS THE FOUNDATION OF GOOD MENTAL HEALTH 59
  59. 59.  We need to get to know our emotions Pay attention to them and honor them, however subtle Do not name them like street signs and manage them like symptoms of disease Bring all the parts of us into the process and into balance Begins with our strengths and our comfort zone DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG 11/30/2012 60
  60. 60. Emotions arenecessaryexpressionsof what areperhapsunspeakableinner truths 61
  61. 61. Give kids room to simply experience a feeling, in the rightcontext. Can we model this, even a little, according to our own style. Provide boundaries and a framework for this Some kids need immediate outlet in the form of action Many gifted kids rely on metaphor, symbol to indirectly express complex feelings (safety and container for complex, abstract, multi-themed feelings) They need to know we can just LISTEN, be present and sometimes reflect feelings, sometimes not DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG 11/30/2012 62
  62. 62.  Places them into simplistic categories Based on early socialization about which emotions are right, wrong, acceptable and unacceptable Stops the natural flow Intellectualizes emotional experience: removes the complexity and dynamic of emotional experience Tells us that rational logical thought is preferable /more reliable Instills fear about emotional contagion: strong emotions are catching and unpredictable: SQUELCH THEM Tells us that in-depth emotional experience or dynamic expression of emotions is undesirable: TOO TRICKY Offers us wholesale denial, medication and treatment to remove themRESULTS: Emotionally constipated, over regulated or inauthentic expression DAIMON INSTITUTE: IPG 11/30/2012 63
  63. 63. 22. Affordopportunities toplay, to compete,in structured andunstructuredforums 64
  64. 64. 23. Ω : anytime, anywhere:Stop and Think: Begin by interrupting your normal daily thoughts. Think about what is going on around you. Then switch your thoughts to yourself and your breathing. Take a few deep breaths, exhaling slowly.Body scan: Mentally scan your body. Notice areas that feel tense or cramped, such as your neck or shoulders. Loosen up these areas. Let go of as much tension as you can.Head moves: Slowly rotate your head to the left in a smooth, circular motion, leaning your left ear to your left shoulder. Rotate your head to the right in a smooth, circular motion, leaning your right ear to your right shoulder. (Stop any movements that cause pain.)Letting go: Roll your shoulders forward and backward several times. Let all of your muscles completely relax.Remember when: Recall and focus on a pleasant memory.The breath that cleanses: Take another deep breath and exhale slowly. You should feel more relaxed. 11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 65
  65. 65. 1. What happens in your body when you think about _______?2. What happens in your body when you are ____________ (in a specific environment, or thinking about going to a specific environment?)3. What happens in your body when you sit quietly and take deep, slow breaths? 11/30/2012 66
  66. 66. 25. Understand the 1. increased cerebral blood flowphysiological effects and oxygen to the brain;of Physical Activity 2. the development of capillaries, which permit collateral circulation; 3. the release of dopamine and serotonin, two essential neurotransmitters that help sustain attention and the ability to concentrate; 4. the increase of BDFN, which facilitates neuroplasticity -- the ability of the brain to continue to grow and change throughout our life span. 67
  67. 67. • Aerobic exercise program decreases depression and is as effective as clinical trials with anti-depressant medications• Physical activity is related to better cognitive health and effective functioning across the lifespan. 68
  68. 68. Part of the routines of life:walking, biking to school, breaksin screen timeMartial artsDance of all kindsNature walks, hikingFencing/archerySwimming water sportsOrganized sports: bball, soccer,footballRoutines in the home
  69. 69. Nutritional neuroscience is one of the hottest areas of current scientific investigation Regrettably most clinical mental health people and educators are unfamiliar with the profound impact food has on the brain and body
  70. 70. Brain Food• The most powerful tool we have to change our brain function and overall health is our forks!• Food is NOT just calories or energy• Food contains information that talks to your genes turning them on or off and affecting their function moment to moment11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 71
  71. 71. “The modern Western diet is completely incompatible with optimal health and good brain function” Lyon, 200211/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 72
  72. 72. Environmental factors contribute to this downturn: 1. Breakdown in traditional family supports 2. Sedentary lifestyles 3. Increased exposure to processed food 4. Pesticides and pollutants 5. Dramatic dietary changes11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 73
  73. 73. • Water mainstay of liquid (juice becomes the treat)• Eliminate or reduce significantly foods high in fat and sugar: eliminate fried foods• Avoid refined foods wherever possible: whole grain bread, brown rice preferable• Mainly fresh vegetables, fresh fruit, lean meat and chicken (preferably organic or free range), fish ( especially oily fish), organic or free range eggs, beans, nuts , seeds, whole grains, organic milk and cheese. Fiber and unprocessed foods key!• If using a lot of sodas, sugary foods and French fries, take it slowly and gradually with the substitutions.• Enjoy creating new healthy eating habits together; enjoy a treat once in a while11/30/2012 DAIMON INSITTUTE: Body-Mind Practices 74
  74. 74. SCREEN TIMEThe costs of excessive screen time are tooenormous to ignore. They include• poor school performance• childhood obesity• problems with attention to name a few
  75. 75. LIMIT SCREEN TIME AND AFFORD OTHER OPTIONS •School-age children spend nearly twice as many hours with screen media (television, video games, computers, and hand-held devices), as they do in school. •Screen media use is at an all-time high among preschoolers (ages 2-5). •Nielsen reports, young children spend, on average, more than 32 hours a week watching television, playing video games, and using computers.•47% of babies one year old and younger watch TV and videos for an average of almost 2 hours a day—even though the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no screen time for children under two.
  76. 76. 27. LIMIT SCREEN TIME AND AFFORD OTHER OPTIONS1.Craft & Puppet Night-2.Host a family game night-3.Kids in the Kitchen Family4.Olympics in the Neighborhood5.Family Art Gallery

×