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Selfish Accessibility: WordCamp Toronto 2014

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We can all pretend that we’re helping others by making web sites accessible, but we are really making the web better for our future selves. Learn some fundamentals of web accessibility and how it can benefit you (whether future you from aging or you after something else limits your abilities). We’ll review simple testing techniques, basic features and enhancements, coming trends, and where to get help. This isn’t intended to be a deep dive into ARIA, but more of an overall primer for those who aren’t sure where to start nor how it helps them.

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Selfish Accessibility: WordCamp Toronto 2014

  1. 1. Selfish Accessibility Presented by Adrian Roselli for WordCamp Toronto 2014 #WCTO
  2. 2. About Adrian Roselli • Co-written four books. • Technical editor for two books. • Written over fifty articles, most recently for .net Magazine and Web Standards Sherpa. Great bedtime reading!
  3. 3. About Adrian Roselli • Member of W3C HTML Working Group, W3C Accessibility Task Force, five W3C Community Groups. • Building for the web since 1994. • Founder, owner at Algonquin Studios (AlgonquinStudios.com). • Learn more at AdrianRoselli.com. • Avoid on Twitter @aardrian. I warned you.
  4. 4. What is a11y? • A numeronym for “accessibility”: • The first and last letter, • The number of characters omitted. • Prominent on Twitter (character restrictions): • #a11y • Examples: • l10n → localization • i18n → internationalization Ain’t language funsies?
  5. 5. Accessibility Gets No Respect “Cyberspace” (gray) “Lime Rickey” (green) “Online” (blue) In fairness, Sherwin Williams needs to come up with a lot of color names...
  6. 6. Accessibility Gets No Respect …however I think the team could have done better than this.
  7. 7. What We’ll Cover • Boring Statistics • How to Be Selfish • Basic Tests • Some Techniques • Accessibility and WordPress • Questions (ongoing!) Work with me, people.
  8. 8. Boring Statistics 1 of 5 sections.
  9. 9. Any Disability • In the United States: • 10.4% aged 21-64 years old, • 25% aged 65-74 years old, • 50% aged 75+. • Includes: • Visual • Hearing • Mobility • Cognitive http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs282/en/ http://www.disabilitystatistics.org/reports/2012/English/HTML/report2012.cfm?fips=2000000&html_year=2012
  10. 10. Vision Impairments • 285 million worldwide: • 39 million are blind, • 246 million have low vision, • 82% of people living with blindness are aged 50 and above. • 1.8% of Americans aged 21-64. • 4.0% of Americans aged 65-74. • 9.8% of Americans aged 75+. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs282/en/ http://www.disabilitystatistics.org/reports/2012/English/HTML/report2012.cfm?fips=2000000&html_year=2012
  11. 11. Hearing Impairments • 360 million people worldwide have disabling hearing loss. • 17% (36 million) of American adults report some degree of hearing loss: • 18% aged 45-64 years old, • 30% aged 65-74 years old, • 47% aged 75+ years old. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs300/en/ https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/statistics/Pages/quick.aspx
  12. 12. Mobility Impairments • In the United States: • 5.5% aged 21-64 years old. • 15.6% aged 65-74 years old. • 32.9% aged 75+. http://www.disabilitystatistics.org/reports/2012/English/HTML/report2012.cfm?fips=2000000&html_year=2012
  13. 13. Cognitive Impairments • Dyslexia, • Dyscalculia, • Memory issues, • Distractions (ADD, ADHD), • In the United States: • 4.3% aged 21-64 years old. • 5.4% aged 65-74 years old. • 14.4% aged 75+. http://www.disabilitystatistics.org/reports/2012/English/HTML/report2012.cfm?fips=2000000&html_year=2012&subButton=Get+HTML
  14. 14. How to Be Selfish 2 of 5 sections.
  15. 15. WebAIM’s Hierarchy for Motivating Accessibility Change http://webaim.org/blog/motivating-accessibility-change/
  16. 16. My Hierarchy for Motivating Accessibility Change Is better, no?
  17. 17. Getting Older • Affects (nearly) everyone, • Carries risks and side effects, • Is not for the young. I’m still experimenting with it.
  18. 18. Rising Damp on Flickr.
  19. 19. Darren Baldwin on Flickr.
  20. 20. Accidents • Broken limbs, • Eye injuries, • Hearing injuries, • Head trauma. All of these have happened to me, multiple times.
  21. 21. James Lee on Flickr.
  22. 22. Rev Stan on Flickr.
  23. 23. Let Ideas Compete on Flickr.
  24. 24. Fluffy Steve on Flickr.
  25. 25. Paul Townsend on Flickr.
  26. 26. But I’m Invincible! • Multi-tasking, • Sunlight, • Eating at your desk, • No headphones handy, • Content is not in your native language. The sun is trying to kill me.
  27. 27. https://twitter.com/aardrian/statuses/388733408576159744
  28. 28. Shawn Liu on Flickr.
  29. 29. Bitznbitez on Flickr.
  30. 30. Mariëlle on Flickr.
  31. 31. barockschloss on Flickr.
  32. 32. Seb on Flickr.
  33. 33. A.Davy on Flickr.
  34. 34. Raul Lieberwirth on Flickr.
  35. 35. Tim Norris on Flickr.
  36. 36. Steve Rhodes on Flickr.
  37. 37. SuperFantastic on Flickr.
  38. 38. Jacob Enos on Flickr.
  39. 39. World Bank Photo Collection on Flickr.
  40. 40. Lars Kristian Flem on Flickr.
  41. 41. Tech Support • Think of your family! • Think of your time spent helping them! • Think of the wasted holidays! This is why we hate the holidays.
  42. 42. Robert Simmons on Flickr.
  43. 43. The Message • Supporting accessibility now helps to serve future you. There is no try.
  44. 44. The Message • Supporting accessibility now helps to serve future you. • Supporting accessibility now helps injured you, encumbered you. There is no try.
  45. 45. The Message • Supporting accessibility now helps to serve future you. • Supporting accessibility now helps injured you, encumbered you. • Getting younger developers to buy in helps future you – if you teach them well. There is no try.
  46. 46. Basic Tests 3 of 4 sections.
  47. 47. Click on Field Labels • When you click label text next to a text box, does the cursor appear in the field? • When you click label text next to a radio / checkbox, does it get toggled? • When you click label text next to a select menu, does it get focus? http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/09/05/the-6-simplest-web-accessibility-tests-anyone-can-do/
  48. 48. Unplug Your Mouse • Turn off your trackpad, stick, trackball, etc. • Can you interact with all controls (links, menus, forms) with only the keyboard? • Can you tell which item has focus? • Does the tab order match your expectation? http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/09/05/the-6-simplest-web-accessibility-tests-anyone-can-do/
  49. 49. Turn off Images • Can you still make sense of the page? • Is content missing? • Can you still use the site? • Is your alt text useful? http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/09/05/the-6-simplest-web-accessibility-tests-anyone-can-do/
  50. 50. Turn on High Contrast Mode • Windows only. • Background images and colors are replaced. • Text colors are replaced. • Does this make your site unusable? http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/09/05/the-6-simplest-web-accessibility-tests-anyone-can-do/ http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2012/08/css-background-images-high-contrast-mode.html
  51. 51. Turn off CSS • Does important content or functionality disappear? • Do error messages or other items that rely on visual cues make sense? • Is content still in a reasonable order? • Do any styles (colors, text effects, etc.) remain? http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/09/05/the-6-simplest-web-accessibility-tests-anyone-can-do/
  52. 52. Test for Colorblindness/Contrast • Is there enough contrast? • Are hyperlinks, menus, etc. still visible? • Tools: • Chrome Color Contrast Analyzer • Lea Verou’s Contrast Ratio • WebAIM Color Contrast Checker • CheckMyColours.com http://www.inpixelitrust.fr/blog/en/tips-create-accessible-color-palette/ http://alistapart.com/blog/post/easy-color-contrast-testing
  53. 53. Protanopia
  54. 54. Deuteranopia
  55. 55. Tritanopia
  56. 56. Look for Captions & Transcripts • Do video/audio clips have text alternatives? • Are links to closed-captions or transcripts built into the player or separate text links? • Is there an audio description available? • Tools: • Media Access Australia YouTube captioning tutorial, Vimeo captioning tutorial, • Tiffany Brown’s WebVTT tutorial, • DIY Resources for Closed Captioning and Transcription from 3 Play Media. http://webaim.org/techniques/captions/
  57. 57. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCqN_cCLnnk
  58. 58. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  59. 59. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  60. 60. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? • Do you warn before opening new windows? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  61. 61. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? • Do you warn before opening new windows? • Do links to downloads provide helpful info? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  62. 62. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? • Do you warn before opening new windows? • Do links to downloads provide helpful info? • Are you using pagination links? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  63. 63. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? • Do you warn before opening new windows? • Do links to downloads provide helpful info? • Are you using pagination links? • Are your links underlined (or otherwise obvious)? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  64. 64. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? • Do you warn before opening new windows? • Do links to downloads provide helpful info? • Are you using pagination links? • Are your links underlined (or otherwise obvious)? • Is there alt text for image links? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  65. 65. Hyperlinks! • Is there any “click here,” “more,” “link to…”? • Are you using all-caps, URLs, emoticons? • Do you warn before opening new windows? • Do links to downloads provide helpful info? • Are you using pagination links? • Are your links underlined (or otherwise obvious)? • Is there alt text for image links? • Is the link text consistent? http://www.sitepoint.com/15-rules-making-accessible-links/
  66. 66. http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2014/03/i-dont-care-what-google-did-just-keep.html
  67. 67. Some Techniques 4 of 5 sections.
  68. 68. Checklist • Accessibility is not a checklist. http://accessibility.net.nz/blog/the-problems-with-ramps-blended-into-stairs/
  69. 69. Checklist • Accessibility is not a checklist. • Accessibility is an ongoing process. http://accessibility.net.nz/blog/the-problems-with-ramps-blended-into-stairs/
  70. 70. Stairamp http://accessibility.net.nz/blog/the-problems-with-ramps-blended-into-stairs/ Dean Bouchard on Flickr
  71. 71. WAI-ARIA • Web Accessibility Initiative – Accessible Rich Internet Applications. • Adds accessibility information to HTML elements. • Can be used with prior versions of HTML. • WAI-ARIA 1.0 published March 20, 2014. http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria/
  72. 72. Four Five Rules of ARIA Use 1. If you can use a native HTML5 element with semantics/behavior already built in, then do so, instead of repurposing another element. RT this! https://twitter.com/aardrian/status/454249142387081219
  73. 73. Four Five Rules of ARIA Use 2. Do not change native semantics. Unless you really have to (no <h1> with a role="button", for example). RT this! https://twitter.com/aardrian/status/454249201564532737
  74. 74. Four Five Rules of ARIA Use 3. All interactive ARIA controls must be usable with the keyboard — keyboard users must be able to perform equivalent actions. RT this! https://twitter.com/aardrian/status/454249253284483072
  75. 75. Four Five Rules of ARIA Use 4. Do not use role="presentation" or aria-hidden=" true" on a focusable element. If you do so, some users will never be able to focus. RT this! https://twitter.com/aardrian/status/454249297408585729
  76. 76. Four Five Rules of ARIA Use 5. All interactive elements must have an accessible name (in progress). This may come from a visible (text on a button) or invisible (alt text on an image) property. As of May 12: http://rawgit.com/w3c/aria-in-html/master/index.html#fifth-rule-of-aria-use Accessible name: http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria/terms#def_accessible_name
  77. 77. Role Playing Stolen from Heydon Pickering: https://twitter.com/heydonworks/status/420196676297424898/
  78. 78. HTML/ARIA Don’t <div onclick="DoThing();">Do a thing.</div> I see this all the time.
  79. 79. HTML/ARIA Don’t <div onclick="DoThing();" tabindex="0">Do a thing.</div> I see this a bunch, too.
  80. 80. HTML/ARIA Don’t <div onclick="DoThing();" tabindex="0" onkeypress="DoThing();">Do a thing.</div> Excluded bits like if(event.keyCode==32||event.keyCode==13)DoThing();
  81. 81. HTML/ARIA Don’t <div onclick="DoThing();" tabindex="0" onkeypress="DoThing();" role="button">Do a thing.</div> ARIA roles to the rescue! Er…
  82. 82. HTML/ARIA Do <button onclick="DoThing();" onkeypress="DoThing();">Do a thing.</button> Or just start with the right element. http://www.karlgroves.com/2013/05/14/links-are-not-buttons-neither-are-divs-and-spans/
  83. 83. WAI-ARIA • Accessibility Lipstick on a Usability Pig By Jared Smith: http://webaim.org/blog/accessibility-lipstick-on-a-usability- pig/ • What is WAI-ARIA, what does it do for me, and what not? By Marco Zehe: http://www.marcozehe.de/2014/03/27/what-is-wai- aria-what-does-it-do-for-me-and-what-not/ ARIA ALL THE THINGS!
  84. 84. HTML5 Elements • Sectioning elements already have accessibility built in. Use them. • <header> • <nav> • <main> (one per page) • <aside> • <footer> • <form> (a search form) This stuff is baked in!
  85. 85. HTML5/ARIA Landmarks • They don’t always have support in assistive technologies (AT), so use roles as well. • <header role="banner"> (once per page) • <nav role="navigation"> • <main role="main"> (one per page) • <aside role="complementary"> • <footer role="contentinfo"> (once per page) • <form role="search"> http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/wiki/Using_ARIA_landmarks_to_identify_regions_of_a_page
  86. 86. Generic Desktop Layout <header role="banner"> <nav role="navigation"> <aside role="complementary"> <form role="search"> <main role="main"> <footer role="contentinfo">
  87. 87. Generic “Mobile” Layout <header role="banner"> <nav role="navigation"> <form role="search"> <main role="main"> <aside role="complementary"> <footer role="contentinfo"> “Mobile” really means narrow screen in RWD, as well as this context.
  88. 88. HTML5 Headings • Use normal heading ranks to convey document structure. • Don’t skip; go in order. <h1> <h2> <h3> <h4> <h5> <h6> Fun fact: NCSA Mosaic 1.0 had provisions for an <h7>: http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2013/04/ncsa-moscaic-turns-20.html
  89. 89. HTML5 Headings • Document Outline Algorithm… • Is a myth, • Isn’t implemented in any browsers, • Should not be relied upon. • Don’t be fooled by articles claiming otherwise. • Spec being updated. • No SEO benefit for one over other. http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2013/12/the-truth-about-truth-about-multiple-h1.html
  90. 90. The New <div>itis • <section>orrhea, <article> abuse. • These map to regions in page navigation order (role="region"). • Can overwhelm users of AT. • If it doesn’t get an <h#>, don’t use it. • If it shouldn’t be in the document outline, don’t use it. http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html#the-section-element http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html#the-article-element
  91. 91. Focus Styles http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2014/06/keep-focus-outline.html
  92. 92. Focus Styles • Necessary for keyboard use, • Use in conjunction with :hover, • Check libraries for :focus styles. It’s built in, just don’t mess with it.
  93. 93. Focus Styles https://twitter.com/aardrian/statuses/489837817129099266
  94. 94. Alternative Text • Which is correct? • <img src="fox.png" alt="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2013/11/image-alt-exception-change-re-re-re.html
  95. 95. Alternative Text • Which is correct? • <img src="fox.png" alt="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> • <img src="fox.png" title="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2013/11/image-alt-exception-change-re-re-re.html
  96. 96. Alternative Text • Which is correct? • <img src="fox.png" alt="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> • <img src="fox.png" title="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> • <img src="fox.png" aria-label="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2013/11/image-alt-exception-change-re-re-re.html
  97. 97. Alternative Text • Which is correct? • <img src="fox.png" alt="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> • <img src="fox.png" title="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> • <img src="fox.png" aria-label="Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book."> • <img src="fox.png" aria-labelledby="FoxPic"> <p id="FoxPic">Photo of a fox reading aloud from a book.</p> http://blog.adrianroselli.com/2013/11/image-alt-exception-change-re-re-re.html
  98. 98. Alternative Text • Use alt attribute. • Longdesc links to more verbose alternative. http://www.w3.org/blog/2014/03/wcag-techniques-for-image-text-alternatives/
  99. 99. Alternative Text Decision Tree 1. What role does image play? 2. Does it present new info? http://www.4syllables.com.au/2010/12/text-alternatives-decision-tree/ http://dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/#tree 3. What type of info? Informative Yes alt="" or <a href="foo"><img alt="">Link</a> alt="" or Use CSS alt="descriptive identification" or alt="short label" + caption Purely Decorative Sensory No alt="label for link" alt=“short alternative" or alt="short label" + caption Long / Complex Short / Simple alt="short label + location of long alternative" or long text alternative on same or linked page
  100. 100. Accessibility and WordPress 5 of 5 sections
  101. 101. WP Accessibility Plug-in http://wordpress.org/plugins/wp-accessibility/
  102. 102. WP Accessibility Plug-in • Simplest, quickest first step, • Has many configuration options, • Requires WordPress 3.4.2, • Compatible up to WordPress 4.0, • Install/configuration tutorial: Make Your WordPress Site More Accessible By the same guy who put together “Prioritization: Accessibility Tickets for WP 4.0”
  103. 103. WP Accessibility Plug-in • Enable skip links • Add skip links with user-defined targets • Add language and text direction attributes to HTML element • Add outline to keyboard focus state • Add toolbar toggling between high contrast, large print, desaturated views of your theme • Add long description to images • Remove target attribute from links • Force search page error when search is made with empty text string • Remove tabindex from elements that are focusable • Strip title attributes from images inserted into content • Remove redundant title attributes from page lists, category lists, archive menus • Add post titles to standard “read more” links • Address some accessibility issues in WordPress admin styles • Show color contrast between two provided hex values • Enable diagnostic CSS This is a copy-paste job, you can see the list for yourself at the plug-in page.
  104. 104. Accessible Themes • Look for “accessibility-ready,” • Use the tag filter to find them, not the theme search: http://wordpress.org/themes/tag-filter/ • Themes must be verified, validated against WP accessibility guidelines: https://make.wordpress.org/themes/guidelines/gui delines-accessibility/ Themes claiming to be accessible may not be, so start here.
  105. 105. Accessible Themes Just toggle the “accessibility-ready” checkbox, making sure to select “Match ALL of the checkboxes.”
  106. 106. Accessible Themes 15 options so far, including at least a couple that should be familiar.
  107. 107. Cities Project • Increase number of free, accessible themes, • Themes in development: • Los Angeles, Copenhagen, Sydney, Boston, Toronto, New York, Mumbai, D.C., Canberra, Montreal, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Nashville, Ottawa, Twin Cities, Augusta Georgia • http://accessiblejoe.com/cities/ Remember, they must pass validation by the WordPress Accessibility team.
  108. 108. Accessible Forms • Gravity Forms • http://cynng.wordpress.com/2014/02/26/tips-on-making- your-gravity-forms-as-accessible-as-possible/ • Add HTML5 inputs, • Avoid presets, • Add fieldset/label, • Disable tabindex, • Still needs ARIA. Remember to test the form.
  109. 109. Accessible Forms • Contact Form 7 • http://blog.rrwd.nl/2014/03/01/how-to-set-up-an- accessible-form-using-contact-form-7-in-wordpress/ • Change the default form, • Add shortcode for error messages, • Add labels, • Edit wp_config.php to disable CSS, JS, <p> with each new line. Remember to test the form.
  110. 110. Remove Problematic Formatting Options From tinyMCE Plug-in https://wordpress.org/plugins/remove-problematic-formatting-options-from-tinymce/
  111. 111. Remove Problematic Formatting Options From tinyMCE Plug-in • Removes some buttons from tinyMCE: • Font color, • Underline, • Alignment. • Removes <h1> from role menu. • Helps keep authors from overriding site styles, • Added benefit of limiting risk to accessibility. Sometimes you stumble across a plug-in that may be useful in more than one way.
  112. 112. Resources • WordPress Themes Suck at Accessibility: It’s Time to Fix It (June 18, 2014) http://wptavern.com/wordpress-themes-suck-at-accessibility- its-time-to-fix-it • WordPress admin accessibility report (March 30, 2014) http://discuss.wpuk.org/2014/03/30/wordpress-admin-accessibility- report/ • Tickets with a focus on accessibility https://core.trac.wordpress.org/focus/accessibility These are mostly additional reading, context, and where to start.
  113. 113. Questions This isn’t a section, you should have been asking all along.
  114. 114. Resources • Web Accessibility and Older People: Meeting the Needs of Ageing Web Users http://www.w3.org/WAI/older-users/Overview.php • Easy Checks - A First Review of Web Accessibility http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/preliminary • How People with Disabilities Use the Web: Overview http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web/ Overview.html In addition to the gems I’ve sprinkled throughout.
  115. 115. Resources • 2.11 ARIA Role, State, and Property Quick Reference http://www.w3.org/TR/aria-in-html/#aria-role-state-and- property-quick-reference • 2.12 Definitions of States and Properties (all aria- * attributes) http://www.w3.org/TR/aria-in-html/#definitions-of-states- and-properties-all-aria--attributes • Detecting Screen Readers – No http://www.webaxe.org/detecting-screen-readers-no/ In addition to the gems I’ve sprinkled throughout.
  116. 116. Resources • a11yTips http://dboudreau.tumblr.com/ • How to Write User Stories for Web Accessibility http://www.interactiveaccessibility.com/blog/how-write- user-stories-accessibility-requirements • Book Excerpt: A Web for Everyone http://uxmag.com/articles/book-excerpt-a-web-for-everyone In addition to the gems I’ve sprinkled throughout.
  117. 117. Selfish Accessibility Presented by Adrian Roselli for WordCamp Toronto 2014 Slides from this talk will be available at rosel.li/WCTO My thanks and apologies.

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