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Measuring Content Effectiveness

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Do you know how well your content is performing? Is it achieving the goals you set for it? If it is, do you know why? And even more importantly, if it isn’t, do you know why not? It can be difficult to answer these questions. We know we want to measure something, but we might not know what to measure. We might not even be exactly sure how to articulate the answer we hope to get so that we can “ask the right question.”

In this session, Andrea will describe a method for evaluating your problem space starting with the result you hope to achieve. She’ll discuss the merits of this approach, how it will help you to determine what data you want to collect, and how to best collect and analyze the right data to determine the effectiveness of various kinds of content.

Published in: Design
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Measuring Content Effectiveness

  1. 1. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Measuring the Effectiveness of Content Creating a content measurement framework Andrea L. Ames Enterprise Content Experience Strategist, IBM @aames @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  2. 2. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA ① What is “effective” content? ② Why measure content? ③ Gotchas to watch out for ④ Types of content measures and measurement ⑤ Building a closed-loop content evaluation framework ⑥ Q & A @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  3. 3. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t A metric is something you can measure… However, just because they are measureable, it doesn’t mean those measures are informative. Jared M. Spool Founding Principal, UIE @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  4. 4. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Moves customers successfully through their journey @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  5. 5. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Characteristics of effective content Reach—number of potential customers exposed Awareness—how well known you are Engagement—connecting with potential customers Satisfaction—how well you meet customer expectation Value—difference between what customer gets vs. gives for product Editorial quality—grammatical and stylistic accuracy Usability—ease of use
  6. 6. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Measure content to Tell a story … sell your content initiative Demonstrate the value of your initiative Strategize and make decisions throughout a project Beginning: identify opportunity, prove the strategy is right Middle: show incremental progress, course-correct End: prove value and earn investment for the future Transform opinion to fact … remove emotion from analysis
  7. 7. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Telling the right story … to the right people @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  8. 8. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Tell the right story to the right people Business stakeholders Make a direct connection between your content metrics and the metrics that drive business Prove the value of content and the content experience using metrics that matter to business Content stakeholders Find out what matters most … define common ground
  9. 9. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Engaging content stakeholders Who are their executives, sponsors, and stakeholders? How is their progress or result being measured? Who measures their performance? Who funds them? What matters to them? Where do their goals align with yours? Build bridges! Where do their goals conflict with yours? Build business cases!
  10. 10. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Example metrics for stakeholder conversations Stakeholder Example metrics Example associated content teams Example content metrics Marketing Executive  ROI  Cost per lead  Campaign performance  Conversion metrics  Web team  Social team  Event team  Web traffic  Click-throughs  Likes and shares  Conversions  Collateral distributed  Cost per unit produced Sales Executive  Viable leads  Sales growth  Product performance  Sales enablement  Education & training  Beta programs  Proofs of Concept (PoCs) to sale  Number of classes  Beta program participants  Cost per unit produced Support Executive  Call volume  Call length  Customer sat.  Ticket deflection  Web support team  Call center team  Amount of web information produced  Number of calls reduced  Time of calls reduced  Cost per unit produced Development Executive  Dev cost  Market share  Lines of code  Compliance  Quality and test  Product documentation team  Developers who publish whitepapers and case studies  Product community forums and wikis  Lines of text, number of pages, etc.  Cost per unit produced  Web traffic  Number of forum participants
  11. 11. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t What How many Why Compliance @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  12. 12. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Types of measures Quantitative Describe the what, or how many of the what Can be measured with numbers— absolutely, mathematically Examples: Conversions, likes, shares, number of calls Qualitative Describe intangibles, like the why Non-numerical Examples: Sentiment, how important something is, how much the respondents like something, how likely they are to recommend Compliance items Quantitative—you can count them But you’re only counting “1” More important is the perceived value of that “1” Examples: Models applied, templates used, processes followed Heuristics Rules of thumb No one single “rule” or set of “rules” Inspection method Performed by “experts” Examples: system visibility, use of affordances
  13. 13. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Close the loop— frameworks make it easy! @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Measure periodically for mid- course correction Take final measures to determine overall project impact Use final measure as baseline for next project Start with a baseline
  14. 14. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Building a content evaluation framework Before you begin—tell the right story to the right people Identify what to measure and collect Identify and begin managing (communicating to) stakeholders! * Determine types of metrics to include in framework * Build a framework, aka, scorecard, to evaluate how you’re doing Normalize “results” to “scores” * Categorize and weight metrics * Create summaries * Validate the framework *
  15. 15. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Select Normalize Categorize & weight @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  16. 16. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Example: Select metrics Quantitative Time Distance Heartrate Qualitative How I feel at start of run How I feel at end of run How the weather conditions were Compliance Doping
  17. 17. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Example: Normalize—select a scale How I feel at start of run Horrible OK Good Great! How I feel at end of run Horrible OK Good Great! What the weather conditions were Freezing Cold Cool Warm/humid Hot/humid How I feel at start of run Horrible OK Good Great! How I feel at end of run Horrible OK Good Great! What the weather conditions were Horrible OK Good Great! (Hot/humid or freezing  cool/dry)
  18. 18. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Example: Normalize—how good is “good?” Time Beginner: 15 minute mile Intermediate: 11 minute mile Athlete: 8 minute mile Distance: % of goal 25-50% 50-75% 75-100% Heartrate Below fat-burning zone Fat burning zone Aerobic zone Time Horrible  implied OK  Beginner: 15 minute mile Good  Intermediate: 11 minute mile Great  Athlete: 8 minute mile Distance: % of goal Horrible  implied OK  25-50% Good  50-75% Great  75-100% Heartrate Horrible  implied OK  Below fat-burning zone Good  Fat burning zone Great  Aerobic zone
  19. 19. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Example: Categorize and weight How do combinations of metrics help tell a story? Fitness = relationship across distance, time, and heartrate Improved fitness = Increased distance Decreased time Decreased heartrate
  20. 20. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Apply to many diverse subjects Compare results for consistency and to uncover gaps @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  21. 21. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t AGENDA @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Q & A @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t
  22. 22. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Resources Jared Spool: KPIs are metrics, but not all metrics are KPIs from UIE Brainsparks blog, Oct 5, 2012: http://bit.ly/VFYvF2 Bhapkar, Neil. 8 KPIs Your Content Marketing Measurements Should Include. Content Marketing Institute. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/Wnb7Cy Klipfolio. The KPI Dashboard—Evolved. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/LhzeL9 Muldoon, Pamela. 4 metrics every content marketer needs to measure: Interview with Jay Baer. Content Marketing Institute. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/X8IvMJ Thompson, Rachel. Stakeholder management: Planning stakeholder communication. MindTools. Web. 12 April 2013. http://bit.ly/8UnUdj
  23. 23. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t@ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Importance of high-quality technical content Based on survey of IBM clients and prospective clients (n=215) as of November 2014 Perception of the company (84.9%) Satisfaction with the product/solution (92%) Perception of product/solution quality (96.3%) Initial purchase decision (87.3%)
  24. 24. @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t Andrea L. Ames Enterprise Content Experience Strategist IBM @ a a m e s • # i n t e l c o n t e n t

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