Personae	
  Poem	
  
Ana	
  
Daughter	
  of	
  ……	
  
Inhabitant	
  of	
  ….	
  
Who	
  was	
  ……	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  a...
Classroom	
  ObservaAon	
  
The	
  more	
  you	
  know,	
  
the	
  more	
  you	
  noAce.	
  
NoAcing	
  
•  NoAcing	
  is	
  a	
  key	
  element	
  
of	
  observaAon.	
  
•  Sherlock	
  Holes	
  noAced	
  
small	
  ...
Key	
  mentoring	
  skills	
  for	
  classroom	
  
observaAons	
  (p.	
  4)	
  
	
  
1.	
  EmpatheAc	
  listening	
  
2.	
...
1.	
  Listening:	
  Seek	
  First	
  to	
  Understand,	
  	
  
Then	
  to	
  Be	
  Understood!”*	
  
	
  
‘listening	
  an...
Emotion Charades:	
  
Find	
  a	
  partner.	
  	
  PracAce	
  ‘listening	
  with	
  your	
  eyes”.	
  	
  Choose	
  an	
  ...
Autobiographical	
  filters	
  
WHEN	
  YOU	
  ARE	
  IN	
  A	
  
CONVERSATION,	
  
	
  DO	
  YOU	
  LISTEN	
  WITH	
  
YOU...
Listening Road Blocks
Spacing Out:
Your mind wanders when others
talk.
Pretend Listening:
You don’t really pay attention t...
Are you a good listener?	
  	
  	
  
Very
Good
Listener
Not Such
a Great
Listener
How can I be a better listener?
How can I assist the Mentee to reflect and enquiry?
2.	
  Ethnographic	
  ObservaAon	
  
•  NoAcing	
  
•  Being	
  descripAve	
  
•  Non-­‐judgemental	
  
•  Focus	
  observ...
Ethnographic	
  Recording:	
  Observing	
  
without	
  glasses	
  
•  Record	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  possible	
  without	
 ...
 
	
  
	
  
	
  
THE	
  BEST	
  TOOL	
  FOR	
  OBSERVATION	
  
Ethnographic	
  DescripAon	
  as	
  ObjecAve	
  
Evidence	
  
•  Provides	
  a	
  wealth	
  of	
  informaAon	
  
•  A	
  g...
ANY	
  VIDEO	
  SEQUENCE	
  	
  
CAN	
  BE	
  
USEFUL	
  
A	
  lesson	
  transcript	
  as	
  well…	
  
	
  
3.	
  ReflecAon	
  
4.	
  How	
  can	
  we	
  give	
  effecAve	
  feedback?	
  
Describe, do not prescribe
Ana María Hurtado Maldonado
ObservaAon	
  and	
  the	
  three-­‐stage	
  model	
  of	
  
helping	
  
Supervision cycle
Pre...
Ana María Hurtado Maldonado
The	
  Typical	
  Life	
  Cycle	
  of	
  a	
  Teacher	
  
Novice - Classroom survival Imitatio...
Ana María Hurtado Maldonado
	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	...
Types	
  of	
  IntervenAon:	
  Feedback	
  Session	
  
A Inviting self-evaluation “How do you think the reading activity
w...
Types	
  of	
  IntervenAon:	
  Feedback	
  Session	
  
G Providing alternatives “Have you tried…?
H Personal interpretatio...
Guide	
  for	
  Mentors,	
  p.	
  45	
  
•  More	
  examples	
  of	
  Mentor	
  intervenAons	
  
Extracts	
  from	
  a	
  lesson	
  by	
  Mrs.	
  
Black	
  
	
  
T: 	
  	
  	
  Now,	
  who	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  star...
Teacher’s	
  classroom	
  language	
  
The	
  kind	
  of	
  quesAons	
  she	
  asks:	
  
–  DISPLAY	
  	
  quesAons	
  (th...
What	
  sort	
  of	
  quesAons	
  does	
  the	
  teacher	
  ask?	
  
	
  
How	
  does	
  the	
  teacher	
  correct/respond...
Explore	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  we	
  can	
  refine	
  
our	
  observaAon	
  powers	
  
	
  
Classroom	
  ObservaAon	
  T...
Task	
  break:	
  Mentoring	
  Role	
  play	
  	
  
1.  Let’s	
  work	
  with	
  a	
  script	
  of	
  an	
  instance	
  of...
Classroom	
  ObservaAon	
  
Ana	
  Maria	
  Hurtado	
  for	
  BE	
  
2014	
  
Classroom observation for Mentors (not for "tormentors")
Classroom observation for Mentors (not for "tormentors")
Classroom observation for Mentors (not for "tormentors")
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Classroom observation for Mentors (not for "tormentors")

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Classroom observation is at the heart of Mentoring. But how to do it so as to encourage intellectual growth and autonomy?

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Classroom observation for Mentors (not for "tormentors")

  1. 1. Personae  Poem   Ana   Daughter  of  ……   Inhabitant  of  ….   Who  was  ……            as  a  girl   And….    as  a  student   Who  is  …….      as  a  teacher   Who  wants  to  be  a  mentor  because….   Who  expects  to…   Hurtado  
  2. 2. Classroom  ObservaAon   The  more  you  know,   the  more  you  noAce.  
  3. 3. NoAcing   •  NoAcing  is  a  key  element   of  observaAon.   •  Sherlock  Holes  noAced   small  details  and  then  put   them  all  together.   •  Describe  without  giving   an  opinion.   •  Previous  knowledge   about  key  methodology   concepts  are  crucial  for   being  able  to  noAce.  
  4. 4. Key  mentoring  skills  for  classroom   observaAons  (p.  4)     1.  EmpatheAc  listening   2.  Classroom  ObservaAon   3.  ReflecAve  ConversaAons   4.  Giving  and              receiving  feedback    
  5. 5. 1.  Listening:  Seek  First  to  Understand,     Then  to  Be  Understood!”*     ‘listening  and  responding  with  both  heart  and   mind  to  understand  the  speaker’s  words,  intent   and  feelings’  (Covey1986:128).       ‘the  essence  of  empathic  listening  is  not  that  we   agree  with  someone;  rather  we  deeply   understand  the  other  person,  emoAonally  as   well  as  intellectually’  (Covey  1986:  148).       * Based on the work by Stephen Covey.
  6. 6. Emotion Charades:   Find  a  partner.    PracAce  ‘listening  with  your  eyes”.    Choose  an   emoAon  to  try  to  express  just  with  your  face  and  body.    You  can   not  use  words.       • Angry • Sad • Embarrassed • Tired • Happy • Thinking • Bored • Impatient • Scared • Worried • Relaxed • Frustrated • Surprised • Stressed • Confused • Flattered • Nervous • Annoyed • Interested
  7. 7. Autobiographical  filters   WHEN  YOU  ARE  IN  A   CONVERSATION,    DO  YOU  LISTEN  WITH   YOUR  OWN   AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL   FILTER?     OR  DO  YOU  LISTEN  TO   ACTUALLY  UNDERSTAND   THE  SPEAKER?      
  8. 8. Listening Road Blocks Spacing Out: Your mind wanders when others talk. Pretend Listening: You don’t really pay attention to the other person, but you pretend to. You say “yeah,”, “uh-huh,” and “cool.” Selective Listening: You listen only to the parts that interest you. Selfish Listening: You always bring the conversation back to you and your life. You say things like “I had that happen too” and “I know how you feel.”
  9. 9. Are you a good listener?       Very Good Listener Not Such a Great Listener How can I be a better listener?
  10. 10. How can I assist the Mentee to reflect and enquiry?
  11. 11. 2.  Ethnographic  ObservaAon   •  NoAcing   •  Being  descripAve   •  Non-­‐judgemental   •  Focus  observaAon  to  look   rather  than  watch   •  Beware  of   “Judgementoring”  (Malderez   and  Hobson,  2013)    
  12. 12. Ethnographic  Recording:  Observing   without  glasses   •  Record  as  much  as  possible  without  subjecAve  comment.   •  Record  evidence  of:   –  What  the  teacher  says,  does  and  writes   –  What  the  students  do  and  say   –  Timing   –  SeaAng  plan(s)   •  Record  real  Ame  every  Ame  the  teacher  changes  acAvity.   •  Give  a  copy  of  the  ethnographic  record  immediately   alerwards.   •  Example….  
  13. 13.         THE  BEST  TOOL  FOR  OBSERVATION  
  14. 14. Ethnographic  DescripAon  as  ObjecAve   Evidence   •  Provides  a  wealth  of  informaAon   •  A  good  starAng  point  to  help  the  teacher:   – Explore   – Discover   – IdenAfy  strengths  and  weaknesses   – Make  an  acAon  plan  
  15. 15. ANY  VIDEO  SEQUENCE     CAN  BE   USEFUL   A  lesson  transcript  as  well…    
  16. 16. 3.  ReflecAon  
  17. 17. 4.  How  can  we  give  effecAve  feedback?   Describe, do not prescribe
  18. 18. Ana María Hurtado Maldonado ObservaAon  and  the  three-­‐stage  model  of   helping   Supervision cycle Pre-Observation Meeting The Lesson Feedback Session Helping Cycle (G. Egan 1984) Stage 1: Exploration Stage 2: New Understanding Stage 3: Action Advisor Functions Attending & listening Empathetic observation Empathetic listening: T’s account of lesson Guide teacher to new ways of seeing lesson Help to draw up a next lesson agenda
  19. 19. Ana María Hurtado Maldonado The  Typical  Life  Cycle  of  a  Teacher   Novice - Classroom survival Imitation - Acquiring recipies Follow advice - Short term planning Advanced Beginner -Classrom routines automated - Episodic knowledge, strategies emerge - Shift attention away from his or her own performance… questioning Competent -Strategies to cope – Improvisational planning -Self confidence - Context based decisions -Focus: the student – Longer term planning Proficient -Intuition and knowledge guide performance -Problem solving - Focus increasingly on learner Expert - Intuitive grasp of situations - Flexible planning - Anticipate - Fluid and seemingly effortless teaching
  20. 20. Ana María Hurtado Maldonado                                                                    (Diagnosis)           Survival          Security                Analysis                          Dynamism  
  21. 21. Types  of  IntervenAon:  Feedback  Session   A Inviting self-evaluation “How do you think the reading activity went?” B Directing “I think you should...” “Why don’t you…?” C Benevolent prescription Suggest, persuade, propose, advise, with the aim of helping the teacher. “I think you would get more students to volunteer if…” No consultation. D Consultative prescription As c), but elicit teacher’s view on proposal. E Emphathising Putting yourself in the teacher’s place F Self-disclosure A technique for empathising. The observer provides information about herself: “I’ve always found it hard to…”
  22. 22. Types  of  IntervenAon:  Feedback  Session   G Providing alternatives “Have you tried…? H Personal interpretation “It seemed to me that…” “From what I say, …” I Confronting “Why didn’t you…?” J Focusing attention “I noticed that…” K ‘Holding up a mirror feedback “You asked the students not to write anything.” L Validation “I liked the way you did…” M Feelings matter “How did you feel…? N Teacher’s ownership of the Feedback “Do you want me to speak about something else…”
  23. 23. Guide  for  Mentors,  p.  45   •  More  examples  of  Mentor  intervenAons  
  24. 24. Extracts  from  a  lesson  by  Mrs.   Black     T:      Now,  who  would  like  to  start?   S3:  I  like  er  cook   T:      I  like  cooking   S3:  I  like  cooking   T:      What  do  you  cook?   S3:    I  cooking  breakfast   T:        I  cook  breakfast   S3:    I  cook  breakfast   T:      Uh  huh  Ok  Anyone  else?   Extracts  from  a  lesson  by  Mrs.   White     T:      Now,  who  would  like  to  start?   S3:  I  like  er  cook   T:      Oh  really  –you  like  cooking?    -­‐  I  thought  only  women  liked  cooking!  So   what  can  you  cook?   S3:  I  cook  breakfast   T:      My  favourite  meal!  Ok,  I’m  going  to  have   breakfast  at  your  house.    What  do  you   usually  cook  for  breakfast?   S3:  Eggs   T:    Do  you  scramble  them  (miming),  or  do   you  fry  them,  or  boil  them  in  water?     S3:  Scramble   T:      Ok  let’s  all  go  to  Jaime’s  house  for   breakfast  
  25. 25. Teacher’s  classroom  language   The  kind  of  quesAons  she  asks:   –  DISPLAY    quesAons  (the  T  already  knows  the  answer).  For   example:  What  can  you  see  here?   –  REFERENTIAL    quesAons  (T  doesn’t  know  the  answer).  E.g.   Do  you  have  a  computer  at  home?)     (Richards  &  Lockhard,  1996)  
  26. 26. What  sort  of  quesAons  does  the  teacher  ask?     How  does  the  teacher  correct/respond  to  “errors”?     What  does  the  teacher  do  or  say  that  enables  the   students  to  figure  out  how  they  are  supposed  to   talk  and  act?     What’s  the  pedagogical  purpose  of  the  lesson?    
  27. 27. Explore  ways  in  which  we  can  refine   our  observaAon  powers     Classroom  ObservaAon  Tasks    (1992),  CUP   By  Ruth  Wajnryb  
  28. 28. Task  break:  Mentoring  Role  play     1.  Let’s  work  with  a  script  of  an  instance  of   classroom  observaAon  (anonymity  preserved)   2.  Roles:  mentor,  mentee,  observer   3.  Role-­‐playing   4.  Pooling  ideas  about  the  experience  
  29. 29. Classroom  ObservaAon   Ana  Maria  Hurtado  for  BE   2014  

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