Thomas Clarke - Global Justice Reference Architecture

502 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
502
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • From an IT perspective, enterprise logic can be divided into two perspectives– business logic and application logic Business logic is a documented implementation of the business requirements Application logic is an automated implementation of the business logic organized into various technology solutions
  • Thomas Clarke - Global Justice Reference Architecture

    1. 1. Global Justice Reference Architecture Why we need it. What it is. Who is working on it.
    2. 2. Focus on the Business– Process and Services Application a Application c Application b Application logic Source: Service-Oriented Architecture, Thomas Erl Business logic
    3. 3. Focus on the Business– Process and Services Application layer Services interface layer Business process layer Application-oriented services Business-oriented services .NET J2EE Legacy Source: Service-Oriented Architecture, Thomas Erl
    4. 4. Focus on the Business– Process and Services Application layer Services interface layer Business process layer .NET J2EE Legacy Source: Service-Oriented Architecture, Thomas Erl orchestration service layer business service layer application service layer
    5. 5. System Integration: Principles <ul><ul><li>Minimize the dependencies between integrated information systems (“loose coupling”). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Favor technologies that leverage open industry standards. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote the treatment of integration interfaces as sharable enterprise assets. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote the one-time entry (or update) of information. </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. System Integration: Business Drivers <ul><ul><li>The enterprise will implement technology capabilities incrementally. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprise solutions will continue to exhibit a mix of commonly-provisioned and agency-unique capabilities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The enterprise will continue to rely on a diverse set of software platforms and development technologies. </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Conceptual Reference Architecture <ul><li>A reference architecture establishes key concepts, relationships, and high-level components to support integration </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies specific areas where we need more work, but demonstrates how everything fits together to satisfy requirements </li></ul>
    8. 8. Capabilities and Services
    9. 9. Interfaces and Interaction
    10. 10. Service Interaction Profiles
    11. 11. Policies, Contracts, Agreements
    12. 12. Execution Context
    13. 13. Business Processes / Service-Capability Hierarchy
    14. 14. Edge vs. Common Capabilities
    15. 16. Implications <ul><li>At least 9 groups are working on different pieces of the architecture. </li></ul><ul><li>One of those groups doesn’t yet exist. </li></ul><ul><li>Some pieces of the architecture are not yet being worked on by anyone. </li></ul><ul><li>There are at least 8 different points of potential technical interoperability issues. </li></ul><ul><li>There are 3 broader points of disconnect. </li></ul>
    16. 17. Status <ul><li>This is a work in progress. </li></ul><ul><li>The concepts may change incrementally, but the basic approach is set. </li></ul><ul><li>Unofficial efforts to collaborate with broader communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Official efforts to brief broader communities. </li></ul>
    17. 18. Resources <ul><li>OASIS SOA Reference Model Technical Committee, www.oasis-open.org </li></ul><ul><li>Scott Came, scottca@dis.wa.gov </li></ul><ul><li>Tom Clarke, tclarke@ncsc.dni.us </li></ul><ul><li>Scott Fairholm, sfairholm@ncsc.dni.us </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Erl, Service-Oriented Architecture: concepts, technology and design. </li></ul>

    ×