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Welcome to the public version of the course INDG 3015: Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing and the Academy, running through the Winter term at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. We are building on the success of the public version of INDG2015. Every week I will upload public versions of the course materials. You are welcome to join in and read along with whatever course texts you have the capacity to access throughout the term. You are welcome to share your reflections on the materials and concepts explored in the course using the hashtag #INDG3015 on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I am so excited to have you join us as we explore Indigenous relationships to the environment

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Public course outline indg 3015 2021

  1. 1. Carleton University School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies INDG 3015 Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing and the Academy Winter 2021 Instructor: Dr. Zoe Todd, Associate Professor, Sociology, Carleton University Public course materials The public is welcome to complete a self-directed version of the course this term (and be- yond) by using the publicly available materials posted on https://fishphilosophy.org/indg- 3015-winter-term-public-site/
  2. 2. I. How it works Tansi! welcome to INDG 3015. This term I’m opening up some aspects of the course to the public. So feel free to read along with whichever texts you can. I’ll post weekly versions of the course powerpoints, with links, discussion questions and summaries of the materials. Feel free to share your thoughts about (and/or artistic, audio-vi- sual or other responses to) the week’s readings and concepts using the hashtag #INDG3015 on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. If I have the capacity through- out the term, I may also upload some oth- er materials as we go. We’re so excited to have you join us in thinking through these important ideas.
  3. 3. Calendar Description: “The relationship between Indigenous traditional ecological knowledges and the academy. Topics include: linguistic barriers, tensions in diffuse ways of knowing, research ethics with respect to Indigenous traditional knowledge, and working with knowledge holders” I.Course Description/ Objectives:This course will provide an overview of diverse Indigenous cosmologies and perspectives on land, water, atmospheres, and more-than-human beings and ethical ways of working with these knowledges. We will draw on Indigenous knowledge from nations/societies/communities around the globe. We will examine case studies of Indigenous environmental- relations and how methods and theory from Indigenous Studies can be used to understand and critically analyze these relationships. We will also consider critiques of western environmental approaches offered by Indigenous peoples, scholars, thinkers, and organizations. The course material draws upon a range of Indigenous Studies sources, and the aim of thecourse is to encourage students to be able to, in writing and in oral presentation work: a) identify historical and contemporary Indigenous environmental relations and Indigenous issues in different parts of the world b) identify decolonizing and/or collaborative research methods c) analyze popular media and academic narratives of Indige- nous environmental knowledges d) apply critical Indigenous discourses to understanding environ- mental issues faced by Indigenous Peoples different parts of the world
  4. 4. III. Texts: Required Text: Kimmerer, Robin Wall. (2003). Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses. Oregon State University Press. ISBN 978-0-87071-499-3. Paperback This book has been ordered at the campus bookstore. It is also available on various online bookstores and in audio book format. Other course readings (articles) will be made available electronically through CuLearn (ARES). IV. Course calendar: Class Schedule: The class will be delivered in a largely asynchronous format (ie: videos, slides, resources will be upload- ed by 3 PM EST on the day of class). I will host discussion groups during class time (Tuesdays, 6:05-7:55 PM, EST) 1. January 12: Introduction to the course • Discussion of syllabus and expectations • Discussion of research proposal, reading reflection assignments and final essay 2. January 19: Indigenous peoples, sovereignty, and the environment Readings to be done before class: • Gathering Moss, Preface; The Standing Stones; Learning to See; the Advantages of Being Small ; Back to the Pond (pages xv to 28) OPTIONAL READINGS • Barker, Joanne. (2006). For Whom Sovereignty Matters. Pp. 1-32 in Sovereignty Matters Locations of Contestation and Possibility in Indigenous Struggles for Self-Determination, Edited by Joanne Barker. University of Nebraska Press. • Little Bear, Leroy. (undated). TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND HUMANITIES: A PERSPECTIVE BY A BLACKFOOT. http://www.sfu.ca/sfublogs-archive/departments/humanities-institute/1101_tradition- al-knowledge-and-humanities-leroy-little-bear.html 3. January 26: Earth/soil/land Gathering Moss -- Sexual Assymetry and the Satelite Sisters; An Affinity for Water; Binding Up the Wounds: Mosses in Ecological Succession; In the Forest of the Waterbear (p. 29-61) OPTIONAL READINGS • Watts, Vanessa. 2013. Indigenous Place-Thought and Agency amongst Humans and Non-humans (First Woman and Sky Woman go on a European Tour!). DIES: Decolonization, Indigeneity, Education and Society 2(1): 20–34 (https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/des/article/view/19145) • Salmón, Enrique. 2012. “Eating the Landscape” (talk). https://bioneers.org/enrique-salmon-eat- ing-the-landscape-american-indian-stories-of-food-and-resilience-bioneers/ 4. February 2: Rocks Gathering Moss -- Kickapoo; Choices; A Landscape of Chance; City Mosses (pp. 62-90) OPTIONAL READINGS • Povinelli, Elizabeth. (1995). Do Rocks Listen? The Cultural Politics of Apprehending Australian Aborigi- nal Labor. American Anthropologist 97(3): 505--518. • Hill, Don. 2008. “Listening to Stones Learning in Leroy Little Bear’s laboratory: Dialogue in the world outside.” Alberta Views Magazine. https://albertaviews.ca/listening-to-stones/
  5. 5. 5. February 9: Sky Gathering Moss -- The Web of Reciprocity; The Red Sneaker; Portrait of Splachnum; The Owner (pp. 100-140) OPTIONAL READINGS • Risling Baldy, Cutcha. (2015). Coyote is Not a Metaphor: On decolonizing, (re)claiming and (re) naming “Coyote”. DIES: Decolonization, Indigeneity and Society 4(1) • Buck, Wilfred. 2009. “Atchakosuk: Ininewuk Stories of the Stars”. First Nations Perspectives 2(1): 71- 83. http://www.mfnerc.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/008_Buck.pdf • Koitsiwe, Motheo. (2014).“The Interviews of African Cultural Astronomy of the Batlhako Community” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIeNQx_jx0s&ab_channel=CulturalAstronomyChannel 6. February 16 BREAK 7. February 23: Fire Gathering Moss -- The Forest Gives Thanks to the Mosses; The Bystander; Straw Into Gold (pp. 141-162) OPTIONAL READINGS • KCET. 2016. “A Gift of Fire to the Land: Talking With Jared Dahl Aldern”. https://www.kcet.org/ shows/tending-the-wild/a-gift-of-fire-to-the-land-talking-with-jared-dahl-aldern • Justice, Daniel Heath. 2016. ““Go Away Water!” Kinship Criticism and the Decolonization Impera- tive”. Chapter 31 in Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures, Deanna Reder and Linda M. Morra, editors. Wilfrid Laurier Press. https://muse.jhu.edu/chapter/1902628 • Kimberley Land Council. https://www.klc.org.au/indigenous-fire-management 7. March 2: Indigenous research methodologies and environmental research ethics CHOOSE ONE TEXT: • Wilson, Shawn. (2010). Relational Accountability in Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods. Winnipeg: Fernwood Publishing. • Smith, Linda Tuhiwai. (1999). Twenty-five Indigenous Projects. Pp.142-155 in Decolonizing Methodol- ogies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed Books. • Reo N (2019) “Inawendiwin and Relational Accountability in Anishnaabeg Studies: The Crux of the Biscuit.” Journal of Ethnobiology 39(1): 65-75 8. March 9: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the Convention on Biological Diversity, and environmental research CHOOSE ONE TEXT: • UNITED NATIONS DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (UNDRIP) [2007] http:// www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/DRIPS_en.pdf • Lightfoot, Sheryl. 2016. “Indigenous Mobilisation and Activism in the UN System,” in Routledge Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, edited by Damien Short and Corinne Lennox, 2016. • The Convention on Biological Diversity: https://www.cbd.int/convention/text/ 9. March 16: Salt/water CHOOSE ONE TEXT: • King, Tiffany Lethabo. 2019. The Black Shoals Chapter 5. A Ceremony for Sycorax (pp. 175-206) and Epilogue: Of Water and Land (pp. 207-210) • Hau’ofa, E. (2005). The Ocean in us. In Hooper A. (Ed.), Culture and Sustainable Development in the Pacific (pp. 32-43). ANU Press. Retrieved from www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2jbj7c.9 • Wheeler, Vehia. 2018. https://thefunambulist.net/articles/guest-columns-recognizing-tahi- ti-nui-maohi-peoples-decolonial-voices-international-politics-j-vehia-wheeler
  6. 6. 10. March 23: Plants CHOOSE ONE TEXT: • Black Elk, Linda. “Food is Medicine”. 2017 Native American Nutrition Conference. https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=VjfkOcxTZ5A • Baker, Janelle. “Research as Reciprocity”. Engaged Scholar Journal. https://journalhosting.ucal- gary.ca/index.php/esj/article/view/61481 • Kimmerer, Robin Wall. “The Serviceberry: an Economy of Abundance” https://emergencemaga- zine.org/story/the-serviceberry/#:~:text=As%20Robin%20Wall%20Kimmerer%20harvests,heart%20 of%20the%20gift%20economy.&text=This%20abundance%20of%20berries%20feels%20like%20 a%20pure%20gift%20from%20the%20land. 11. March 30: time and ‘extinction’** (rethinking extinction from non-western epistemologies) CHOOSE ONE TEXT: • Leonard, Wesley L., 2011. “Challenging “Extinction” through Modern Miami Language Practic- es”. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 35(2): 135-160. • Mitchell, Audra, Todd, Zoe and Pitseolak Pfeifer. (2017). SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Research Report: “How can Aboriginal knowledge systems in Canada contribute to interdisciplin- ary research on the global extinction crisis?” https://anthroreworkinggroup.files.wordpress. com/2017/12/mitchell-pfeifer-todd-sshrc-knowledge-synthesis-research-report-20171.pdf • Mbembe, Achille. 2001. “Time on the Move”, Pp 1-23, Chapter 1 in On the Post Colony. University of California Press. 12. April 6: Environmental Racism CHOOSE ONE TEXT: • Newkirk, Vann R. 2016. “Fighting Environmental Racism in North Carolina”. The New Yorker. https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/fighting-environmental-racism-in-north-carolina • Jacobs, Beverley. 2010. “Environmental Racism on Indigenous Lands and Territories”. https:// www.cpsa-acsp.ca/papers-2010/Jacobs.pdf • Meena, Manish. 2020. “The Brahminical and Colonial history behind Adivasis’ Demoni- sation and Criminalisation” http://adivasiresurgence.com/2020/04/18/the-brahmini- cal-and-colonial-history-behind-adivasis-demonisation-and-criminalisation/ ** thank you to @knowleena on Twitter for sharing this. 13. April 13: wrap up

Welcome to the public version of the course INDG 3015: Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing and the Academy, running through the Winter term at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. We are building on the success of the public version of INDG2015. Every week I will upload public versions of the course materials. You are welcome to join in and read along with whatever course texts you have the capacity to access throughout the term. You are welcome to share your reflections on the materials and concepts explored in the course using the hashtag #INDG3015 on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I am so excited to have you join us as we explore Indigenous relationships to the environment

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