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Indg 2015 fall 2020 week 1 public

Introduction to #INDG2015

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Indg 2015 fall 2020 week 1 public

  1. 1. “Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing” INDG 2015A|Fall 2020|Instructor: Dr. Zoe Todd Associate Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology
  2. 2. Today’s Outline § Introductions § Course introduction § Short activity Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  3. 3. Indigenous Peoples § “Indigenous peoples are inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to people and the environment. They have retained social, cultural, economic and political characteristics that are distinct from those of the dominant societies in which they live. Despite their cultural differences, indigenous peoples from around the world share common problems related to the protection of their rights as distinct peoples.” – United Nations (https://www.un.org/development/desa/indi genouspeoples/about-us.html) https://www.un. org/developme nt/desa/indigen ouspeoples/ab out-us.html Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  4. 4. Indigenous peoples (con’t) § “Indigenous peoples are recognized as being among the world’s most vulnerable, disadvantaged and marginalized peoples. Spread across the world from the Artic to the South Pacific, they number, at a rough estimate, more than 370 million in some 90 countries. While they constitute approximately five per cent of the world’s population, indigenous peoples make up 15 per cent of the world’s poor and one-third of the world’s extremely poor.10” (United Nations OHCHR 2013, p. 3) | source: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/IPeoples/UNDRIPManualForNHRIs. pdf | 10: Citation from: International Fund for Agricultural Development, Engagement with Indigenous Peoples Policy, 2009 Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  5. 5. Indigenous Peoples (con’t) § “... Indigenous peoples each have unique and distinctive cultures, languages, legal systems and histories. Most indigenous peoples have a strong connection to the environment and their traditional lands and territories. They also often share legacies of removal from traditional lands and territories, subjugation, destruction of their cultures, discrimination and widespread violations of their human rights. Through centuries, they have suffered from the non-recognition of their own political and cultural institutions and the integrity of their cultures has been undermined. Indigenous peoples are also harmfully impacted by development processes, which pose a grave threat to their continued existence.” United Nations OHCHR 2013, p. 3) Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  6. 6. 4th World: Manuel and Milando (1970s) § “Mbutu Milando, who was for some time First Secretary of the Tanzanian High Commission in Ottawa, was the first diplomat to welcome a closer relationship with the Indian people through the National Indian Brotherhood. It was Mbutu who first suggested to me the concept and nature of the Fourth World—an idea that grew into a framework for much of my own thought.” | Manuel, George. The Fourth World . University of Minnesota Press. Kindle Edition. Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  7. 7. Global Indigeneity § This course will explore experiences of Indigenous groups around the Globe (The Americas, Oceania/Pacific, Asia, Africa, Siberia, Sápmi) § Thinking through the interconnected environmental impacts of empire/colonialism/capitalism/white supremacy on self-determining Indigenous groups in many regions § Relationality: between and within Indigenous groups but also with the nonhuman world Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  8. 8. Indigeneity as solidarities/intersections § In this course, the focus will be on thinking Indigeneity in terms of solidarities and intersections of oppressions, genocides, histories of self- determining Indigenous groups displaced or harmed through Empire, Colonialism, White Supremacy, and Capital. § In North America: explicitly thinking through Indigeneity in terms of intersections of genocides in Africa, the Middle Passage, and in the Americas. § Indigenous cosmologies, worldviews, laws, knowledges that flow from groups who identify as Indigenous Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020
  9. 9. Activity § Reflect on Indigenous experiences in the territories you currently occupy: who identifies as Indigenous? Who is included in this definition? Who is excluded? How does dominant society where you are located engage with Indigenous knowledges? Copyright Dr. Zoe Todd 2020

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Introduction to #INDG2015

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