Initial ideas

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Initial ideas

  1. 1. Initial Ideas Henry Buckham
  2. 2. Photomontage
  3. 3. Photomontage • Photomontage is a style of photograph that involves stitching together many photographs of a scene to create one big image. This style first emerged in the mid-Victorian era with the first photomontage (also known as combination printing) named ‘The Two Ways Of Life’ by Oscar Rejlander. • The application of stitching many photographs together from different angles to form a big picture was popularized by British artist David Hockney. His works consisted of a large scene of which many small photographs had been taken. They had then been arranged in the correct format but mismatched – creating quite an attractive patchwork effect. • Image editing programs now include automated processes for creating photomontages – where they arrange a series of shots into a complete picture including lots of irregular lines and discerning borders. The process can also be done manually by arranging the individual images, which allows for much greater control over the product.
  4. 4. Long Exposure
  5. 5. Long Exposure • Long exposure photography is a technique that involves a very long shutter speed and a stationary camera, usually on a tripod. The purpose of a long exposure photograph is that it can capture every single frame of movement, creating spectacular ‘ghosting’ images of passing cars or people, or when used at night it can create pictures full of of colour, from aircraft, vehicle and building lights all combined together. • This technique requires a mount for the camera, as due to the long exposure times, even the slightest movement during shooting will ruin the image. Therefore it is important to use a tripod or other stand for the camera. • I used long exposure to photograph the college foyer with an shutter speed of around 15 seconds. This was able to capture some ghosting effects well, and these were because of people moving during shooting.

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