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JUNCTION CONSULTING 
UNION PARK PROPOSAL 
Neighborhood Planning and Public Engagement
COVER LETTER 
Union Park District Council 
1570 Concordia Avenue 
Suite LL100 
St. Paul, MN 55104 
Dear Ms. Julie Reiter and Members of the Union Park District Council, 
Junction Consulting is pleased to submit our Response to your Request for Proposals to design a 
community engagement process for the upcoming neighborhood planning effort. Junction Consulting is a 
locally based planning firm dedicated to working with and for the residents and professionals in our own 
community. Our ideology focuses on providing communities with the resources and knowledge to create 
a plan that fits the needs of their community. Our team includes Dustin Harford, Bryan Lopez, Scott Shafer, 
and Zach Zweifler. 
Our team of professionals have a vast network of experience including, GIS and planning from the 
Humphrey School of Public Affairs, and preservation, and heritage conservation from the College of Design 
at the University of Minnesota. Our multi-disciplinary team, along with our comprehensive approach to 
neighborhood planning have created a vision sensitve to the needs and context of your community. 
We have attached a community engagement process which sets a vision framework for the 
neighborhood’s future, and contributes to the neighborhood plan development. We are excited about 
the opportunity to work with you, the Union Park District Council, neighborhood stakeholders, and the 
community of Union Park residents. Please feel free to contact us regarding any questions you might have, 
or if there is additional information needed. 
Sincerely, 
Junction Consulting 
Dustin Harford 
Bryan Lopez 
Scott Shafer 
Zach Zweifler 
JUNCTION 
CONSULTING
JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 
3 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
UNION PARK CONTEXT 
Introduction Page 4 
Historic Context Page 5 
Political Context Page 6 
Demographic Context Page 6 
Planning Context Page 7 
Existing Planning Documents Page 8 
PARTICIPATION PROCESS OVERVIEW 
Introduction Page 10 
Key Steps in the Planning Process Page 10 
Key Planning Tasks Page 14 
Key Outcomes Page 12 
Conclusion Page 12 
DELIVERABLE 1: OVERARCHING STRATEGY AND TIMELINE 
Introduction Page 13 
Overarching strategy Page 13 
Branding the Initiative Page 13 
Achieving Outcomes Page 14 
DELIVERABLE 2: DESIGN TASKS AND ACTIVITIES 
Introduction Page 15 
Bus Barn Page 15 
Ayd Mill Road Page 17 
St. Paul Bikeways Plan Page 19 
DELIVERABLE 3: RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF PARTICIPANTS 
Overview Page 21 
Challenges Page 21 
Communications Strategy Page 21 
Fresh Page 22 
Key Audiences Page 22 
APPENDIX 
Appendix Page 23
4 
JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 
UNION PARK CONTEXT 
Introduction 
This contextual information was produced in 
support of the planning and participation proposal. 
Information covered in this assessment will include 
historic context of the Union Park District and its 
neighborhoods, political context, demographic 
context, and planning context. Information was 
gathered from a presentation by the Executive 
Director Julie Reiter, a subsequent follow-up 
meeting with Ms. Reiter on Thursday October 9th, 
as well as government documents, U.S. Census 
data, the Union Park website, neighborhood 
websites, and Ramsey County Historical Society. 
2014 district council and ward map. Sourced from City of Saint Paul. 
SNELL-HAM 
LEX-MERRIAM 
PARK HAM 
desnoyer 
park 
shadow 
falls 
lake 
iris 
bus barn site 
UNION PARK 
ayd mill road 
Union Park District and Important Sites. Background image sourced from MNHS.
JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 
5 
UNION PARK CONTEXT 
Union Park Historic Context 
The Union Park District Council (UPDC) was formed 
in 2007, and comprises three legacy Community 
Councils including Lexington-Hamline, Merriam 
Park, and Snelling-Hamline. This recent adjustment 
of the political boundaries persists as an issue the 
District Council seeks to address. Specifically, a 
significant aspect of the historical context regards 
resident’s familiarity and identification with pre-existing 
neighborhoods, rather than a relationship 
with the new Union Park District. In response, 
the Union Park District Council chose its new 
name to represent a geographical union between 
the various neighborhoods in hopes of forging a 
common identity. 
While the name represents a shared interest 
among neighborhoods, the name Union Park has 
historic roots in the City of Saint Paul. Union Park 
was an amusement park located at Lake Iris Park 
that was then platted into city lots for building in 
the late 1880’s. 
The Union Park District Council has been created 
to encompass District 13 in the City of Saint Paul. 
The Union Park District Council is made up of three 
distinct Community Councils, including Merriam 
Park, Lexington-Hamline, and Snelling-Hamline. 
The geographic boundaries of Union Park also 
encompass several neighborhood identities, 
including Desnoyer Park, Shadow Falls, Iris Park, 
Skyline Tower, Snelling Park, Snelling-Hamline, 
Lexington-Hamline and Merriam Park. District 13 
is bounded on the west by the city limits and the 
Mississippi River, on the south by Summit Avenue, 
on the east by Lexington Avenue and on the north 
by University Avenue, over to Cleveland and south 
to the railroad right-of-way and west back to the 
river. 
Many of the houses in Union Park were built in 
the 1880s through the early 1900s as part of a 
commuter suburb, midway between Minneapolis 
and Saint Paul. Prior to rail development, the Red 
River Ox Cart Trail connected the two growing 
cities, then in 1880, the Chicago, Milwaukee, 
and St. Paul Railroad built the “Short Line,” in 
roughly the same location near present day I-94. 
Throughout the 1890’s several streetcar lines were 
created in several locations including University, 
Rondo, Snelling, Prior, and Selby Avenue. 
Lexington-Hamline 
The Lexington-Hamline neighborhood, like many 
streetcar suburbs experienced the 1960s “flight 
to the suburbs,” which proved detrimental to the 
housing stock and real estate values. The challenge 
of the urban flight in the 1960s, in part, led to the 
creation of the Lexington-Hamline neighborhood 
Community Council in 1969, which is still in 
operation today. 
The Lexington-Hamline Community Council has 
been active in advocating for its approximately 
4,000 residents, which includes Concordia 
University and parts of the Midway Marketplace. 
Some of the successes identified by the community 
council are the Hague-Schuneman Tot Lot, 
neighborhood watch program and Police liaison, 
group home maintenance program, retrofitting 
existing lampposts with energy efficient sodium 
vapor lamps, and safer pedestrian crossings. 
Merriam Park 
Prior to the creation of the Union Park District 
Council 13, Merriam Park held the position of 
District 13. The Merriam Park District Council was 
Union Park District Council logo. Sourced from Union Park District 
website. 
Union_Park fairgrounds 1886. Sourced from wikipedia.org
6 
JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 
created in 1978 to serve its residents. Merriam 
Park was originally settled as a “suburban residence 
town” to provide a streetcar suburb lifestyle 
in a prominent location between St. Paul and 
Minneapolis. The Merriam Park suburb grew in 
popularity in the late 19th century, due to the ease 
of commuting to and from work via hourly trains. 
Snelling-Hamline 
Snelling-Hamline was one of three of the original 
district councils for District 13, which created its 
first community plan in 1977. 
Desnoyer Park 
Desnoyer Park is one of a few organized 
neighborhood groups within the greater Union 
Park framework. The residents of Desnoyer 
Park enacted the Desnoyer Park Improvement 
Association in 1931, which is still in operation 
today. This peripheral Saint Paul neighborhood was 
platted in 1887 and lies between the Mississippi 
River Boulevard, Marshall, Cretin, and St. Anthony 
Avenues, and the Town and Country Club on Otis 
Avenue. Residents of this area have a particularly 
strong neighborhood-first identity, and Union Park 
as a secondary identity. 
Political Context 
The City of Saint Paul has 17 District Councils, 
breaking up the entire city, their roles include 
planning and advising on the physical, economic, 
and social development of their areas, identifying 
needs, initiating community program, recruiting 
volunteers, and sponsoring community events 
(Wanner). District 13 is also known as the Union 
Park District Council, and is run by a board of 
29 directors comprised of 15 grids as well as 
representatives from Merriam Park, the Lex-Ham 
community council, local businesses, the Desnoyer 
Park Improvement Association, Concordia 
University, local Nonprofits, Skyline Tower, the 
University of Saint Thomas, and Macalester 
College. In addition to the board of directors there 
are a number of committees and task forces which 
work on specific topics either requiring technical or 
dedicated involvement. These sub-groups include 
Land Use, Neighborhood, Parks and Recreation, 
District Plan, and the Ayd Mill Road Task Force. In 
addition to the volunteers who support the board 
and sub-groups the district council has two staff 
members, Julie Reiter, the executive director, and 
Lisa Heyman, the communications coordinator. 
The Union Park District Council overlays two of 
the seven wards of city council; ward 1 is currently 
represented by councilmember Dai Thao and ward 
4 by councilmember Russ Stark. In addition to the 
councilmembers the residents of the Union Park 
District Council are represented at the City of Saint 
Paul by Mayor Chris Coleman. 
Demographic Context 
Union Park District is, on average, older, higher 
income, more educated, has a younger workforce 
and lower poverty levels than St. Paul as a whole. 
The demographic information covered in this 
section reflects the topics of particular concern 
to the District, namely: student and renter 
populations. 
The areas with the highest population density in 
the district are near St. Thomas and slightly further 
east, along Fairview Avenue. The demographic 
data from the 2010 Census shows a stark divide 
between students and non-students along Prior 
Avenue, by the University of St. Thomas. Between 
Cretin and Prior avenues, 82% of the population 
is between 15 and 24 years old. Just east of Prior 
Avenue, the rate drops to 18%. West of Prior 
Avenue, the median age is 20. East of Prior, the 
median age is 42. Young people are concentrated 
around St. Thomas, Hamline University, and, 
to a lesser extent, Macalester College. A 2012 
zoning ordinance restricted the addition of new 
rental housing for students in the western part of 
the district. Existing single-family rental housing 
and multi-unit buildings are exempt from the 
regulation, but any new student rental housing 
cannot be located within 150 feet of existing 
student rental housing. It is unclear how this 
ordinance has affected the distribution of students 
in the neighborhood since 2012. 
Of course, not all renters are students. Despite the 
high concentration of students near St. Thomas and 
Macalester in the southern part of the district, the 
highest rates of renter-occupied housing are in the 
north, along I-94 and University Avenue. 
UNION PARK CONTEXT

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Harford,Lopez,shafer,zweifler_union park proposal (1)

  • 1. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL Neighborhood Planning and Public Engagement
  • 2. COVER LETTER Union Park District Council 1570 Concordia Avenue Suite LL100 St. Paul, MN 55104 Dear Ms. Julie Reiter and Members of the Union Park District Council, Junction Consulting is pleased to submit our Response to your Request for Proposals to design a community engagement process for the upcoming neighborhood planning effort. Junction Consulting is a locally based planning firm dedicated to working with and for the residents and professionals in our own community. Our ideology focuses on providing communities with the resources and knowledge to create a plan that fits the needs of their community. Our team includes Dustin Harford, Bryan Lopez, Scott Shafer, and Zach Zweifler. Our team of professionals have a vast network of experience including, GIS and planning from the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, and preservation, and heritage conservation from the College of Design at the University of Minnesota. Our multi-disciplinary team, along with our comprehensive approach to neighborhood planning have created a vision sensitve to the needs and context of your community. We have attached a community engagement process which sets a vision framework for the neighborhood’s future, and contributes to the neighborhood plan development. We are excited about the opportunity to work with you, the Union Park District Council, neighborhood stakeholders, and the community of Union Park residents. Please feel free to contact us regarding any questions you might have, or if there is additional information needed. Sincerely, Junction Consulting Dustin Harford Bryan Lopez Scott Shafer Zach Zweifler JUNCTION CONSULTING
  • 3. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS UNION PARK CONTEXT Introduction Page 4 Historic Context Page 5 Political Context Page 6 Demographic Context Page 6 Planning Context Page 7 Existing Planning Documents Page 8 PARTICIPATION PROCESS OVERVIEW Introduction Page 10 Key Steps in the Planning Process Page 10 Key Planning Tasks Page 14 Key Outcomes Page 12 Conclusion Page 12 DELIVERABLE 1: OVERARCHING STRATEGY AND TIMELINE Introduction Page 13 Overarching strategy Page 13 Branding the Initiative Page 13 Achieving Outcomes Page 14 DELIVERABLE 2: DESIGN TASKS AND ACTIVITIES Introduction Page 15 Bus Barn Page 15 Ayd Mill Road Page 17 St. Paul Bikeways Plan Page 19 DELIVERABLE 3: RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF PARTICIPANTS Overview Page 21 Challenges Page 21 Communications Strategy Page 21 Fresh Page 22 Key Audiences Page 22 APPENDIX Appendix Page 23
  • 4. 4 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL UNION PARK CONTEXT Introduction This contextual information was produced in support of the planning and participation proposal. Information covered in this assessment will include historic context of the Union Park District and its neighborhoods, political context, demographic context, and planning context. Information was gathered from a presentation by the Executive Director Julie Reiter, a subsequent follow-up meeting with Ms. Reiter on Thursday October 9th, as well as government documents, U.S. Census data, the Union Park website, neighborhood websites, and Ramsey County Historical Society. 2014 district council and ward map. Sourced from City of Saint Paul. SNELL-HAM LEX-MERRIAM PARK HAM desnoyer park shadow falls lake iris bus barn site UNION PARK ayd mill road Union Park District and Important Sites. Background image sourced from MNHS.
  • 5. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 5 UNION PARK CONTEXT Union Park Historic Context The Union Park District Council (UPDC) was formed in 2007, and comprises three legacy Community Councils including Lexington-Hamline, Merriam Park, and Snelling-Hamline. This recent adjustment of the political boundaries persists as an issue the District Council seeks to address. Specifically, a significant aspect of the historical context regards resident’s familiarity and identification with pre-existing neighborhoods, rather than a relationship with the new Union Park District. In response, the Union Park District Council chose its new name to represent a geographical union between the various neighborhoods in hopes of forging a common identity. While the name represents a shared interest among neighborhoods, the name Union Park has historic roots in the City of Saint Paul. Union Park was an amusement park located at Lake Iris Park that was then platted into city lots for building in the late 1880’s. The Union Park District Council has been created to encompass District 13 in the City of Saint Paul. The Union Park District Council is made up of three distinct Community Councils, including Merriam Park, Lexington-Hamline, and Snelling-Hamline. The geographic boundaries of Union Park also encompass several neighborhood identities, including Desnoyer Park, Shadow Falls, Iris Park, Skyline Tower, Snelling Park, Snelling-Hamline, Lexington-Hamline and Merriam Park. District 13 is bounded on the west by the city limits and the Mississippi River, on the south by Summit Avenue, on the east by Lexington Avenue and on the north by University Avenue, over to Cleveland and south to the railroad right-of-way and west back to the river. Many of the houses in Union Park were built in the 1880s through the early 1900s as part of a commuter suburb, midway between Minneapolis and Saint Paul. Prior to rail development, the Red River Ox Cart Trail connected the two growing cities, then in 1880, the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad built the “Short Line,” in roughly the same location near present day I-94. Throughout the 1890’s several streetcar lines were created in several locations including University, Rondo, Snelling, Prior, and Selby Avenue. Lexington-Hamline The Lexington-Hamline neighborhood, like many streetcar suburbs experienced the 1960s “flight to the suburbs,” which proved detrimental to the housing stock and real estate values. The challenge of the urban flight in the 1960s, in part, led to the creation of the Lexington-Hamline neighborhood Community Council in 1969, which is still in operation today. The Lexington-Hamline Community Council has been active in advocating for its approximately 4,000 residents, which includes Concordia University and parts of the Midway Marketplace. Some of the successes identified by the community council are the Hague-Schuneman Tot Lot, neighborhood watch program and Police liaison, group home maintenance program, retrofitting existing lampposts with energy efficient sodium vapor lamps, and safer pedestrian crossings. Merriam Park Prior to the creation of the Union Park District Council 13, Merriam Park held the position of District 13. The Merriam Park District Council was Union Park District Council logo. Sourced from Union Park District website. Union_Park fairgrounds 1886. Sourced from wikipedia.org
  • 6. 6 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL created in 1978 to serve its residents. Merriam Park was originally settled as a “suburban residence town” to provide a streetcar suburb lifestyle in a prominent location between St. Paul and Minneapolis. The Merriam Park suburb grew in popularity in the late 19th century, due to the ease of commuting to and from work via hourly trains. Snelling-Hamline Snelling-Hamline was one of three of the original district councils for District 13, which created its first community plan in 1977. Desnoyer Park Desnoyer Park is one of a few organized neighborhood groups within the greater Union Park framework. The residents of Desnoyer Park enacted the Desnoyer Park Improvement Association in 1931, which is still in operation today. This peripheral Saint Paul neighborhood was platted in 1887 and lies between the Mississippi River Boulevard, Marshall, Cretin, and St. Anthony Avenues, and the Town and Country Club on Otis Avenue. Residents of this area have a particularly strong neighborhood-first identity, and Union Park as a secondary identity. Political Context The City of Saint Paul has 17 District Councils, breaking up the entire city, their roles include planning and advising on the physical, economic, and social development of their areas, identifying needs, initiating community program, recruiting volunteers, and sponsoring community events (Wanner). District 13 is also known as the Union Park District Council, and is run by a board of 29 directors comprised of 15 grids as well as representatives from Merriam Park, the Lex-Ham community council, local businesses, the Desnoyer Park Improvement Association, Concordia University, local Nonprofits, Skyline Tower, the University of Saint Thomas, and Macalester College. In addition to the board of directors there are a number of committees and task forces which work on specific topics either requiring technical or dedicated involvement. These sub-groups include Land Use, Neighborhood, Parks and Recreation, District Plan, and the Ayd Mill Road Task Force. In addition to the volunteers who support the board and sub-groups the district council has two staff members, Julie Reiter, the executive director, and Lisa Heyman, the communications coordinator. The Union Park District Council overlays two of the seven wards of city council; ward 1 is currently represented by councilmember Dai Thao and ward 4 by councilmember Russ Stark. In addition to the councilmembers the residents of the Union Park District Council are represented at the City of Saint Paul by Mayor Chris Coleman. Demographic Context Union Park District is, on average, older, higher income, more educated, has a younger workforce and lower poverty levels than St. Paul as a whole. The demographic information covered in this section reflects the topics of particular concern to the District, namely: student and renter populations. The areas with the highest population density in the district are near St. Thomas and slightly further east, along Fairview Avenue. The demographic data from the 2010 Census shows a stark divide between students and non-students along Prior Avenue, by the University of St. Thomas. Between Cretin and Prior avenues, 82% of the population is between 15 and 24 years old. Just east of Prior Avenue, the rate drops to 18%. West of Prior Avenue, the median age is 20. East of Prior, the median age is 42. Young people are concentrated around St. Thomas, Hamline University, and, to a lesser extent, Macalester College. A 2012 zoning ordinance restricted the addition of new rental housing for students in the western part of the district. Existing single-family rental housing and multi-unit buildings are exempt from the regulation, but any new student rental housing cannot be located within 150 feet of existing student rental housing. It is unclear how this ordinance has affected the distribution of students in the neighborhood since 2012. Of course, not all renters are students. Despite the high concentration of students near St. Thomas and Macalester in the southern part of the district, the highest rates of renter-occupied housing are in the north, along I-94 and University Avenue. UNION PARK CONTEXT
  • 7. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 7 Traditional methods of public engagement, such as door-to-door flyering, are less effective in areas with high rental populations. Skyline Tower is a prominent low-income high rise near Hamline Avenue and I-94 with 506 dwelling units. High levels of rental housing do not correlate with higher population density. In the portion of Union Park north of I-94, the households are majority renter-occupied and have a population density lower than the district average. Rental housing does correlate with high levels of non-white residents. The areas of the district with the lowest levels of rental housing — Desnoyer Park in the west, the intersection of Howell Avenue and Summit Avenue in the south — also have the least racial diversity. The north and northeast have the highest levels of renter-occupancy and racial diversity. Planning Context Each of St. Paul’s seventeen district councils is required to develop a District Plan and to update it every ten years. District Plans are adopted as addendums to Saint Paul’s Comprehensive Plan, which makes adoption a formal process of engagement and approval. Some notes about the District Plan: “Broad-based community participation” is one of the criteria for all District Plans to be considered for adoption: “at least three (3) widely publicized public meetings to solicit input on issues…” The lead community organization will be assigned a PED staff person for consultation and guidance The plan must be consistent with St. Paul Comprehensive Plan content Plans must be reviewed and approved by the Neighborhood Planning Committee, the Planning Commission, City Council, and Met Council Union Park Planning District (Planning District 13) currently has no District Plan because it is a relatively recent merger of Merriam Park, Snelling-Hamline and Lexington-Hamline Community Councils in 2007 (though each of these neighborhoods has existing Community Plans adopted in 2004, 2007, and 2001, respectively). The Union Park Request for Proposals (RFP) is UNION PARK CONTEXT Occupied Housing Units Owner Occupied UInits Renter Occupied Units Generated By: Rental Versus Owned Housing Union Park Distric Council, Saint Paul, Minnesota For: ± 0 4 8 16 Miles DECEMBER 2014 The Land Use as evaluated in 2010 by the Metropolitain Council for Parcel's within the Union Park District Council of Saint Paul, MN are illustrated here. Legend Golf Course Industrial and Utility Institutitional Major Highway Mixed Use Commercial Mixed Use Industrial Mixed Use Residential Multifamily Office Open Water Park, Recreational, or Preserve Railway Retail and Other Commercial Single Family Attached Single Family Detached Undeveloped Union Park Major Roads Union Park Saint Paul 12,160 111,889 52.94% 51.25% 47.06% 48.75% 2.54 2.68 1.74 2.41 Average household size of owner-occupied unit Average household size of renter occupied unit Rental vs. Owned Housing table by Junction Consulting
  • 8. 8 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL intended to formulate a community engagement plan for the upcoming District Planning process described in this section. Information taken from District and Small Area Plan Guidelines found here: http://www.stpaul.gov/ DocumentCenter/Home/View/15205 Existing Planning Documents As mentioned above, the three legacy district councils had pre-existing Community or Small Area Plans prior to the merger that formed UPDC. Lexington-Hamline adopted its small area plan in 2001; Merriam Park adopted its Community Plan in 2004; Snelling-Hamline adopted its Neighborhood Plan in 2007. Because the neighborhoods share proximity and characteristics, there are common themes expressed in their planning documents, including: Identification as primarily-residential neighborhoods with commercial nodes “The recreational opportunities, the walkable nature of the neighborhoods, and the balance of uses give the community an ‘urban village’ feel…” – Merriam Park Community Plan – 2004, pg. 2 Values for pedestrian-oriented development, strong public realm, and neighborhood aesthetics “The neighborhood supports protecting and creating open spaces in order to provide safe, accessible public spaces where all residents may gather for recreation, physical activity, and social interaction.” Snelling-Hamline Neighborhood Plan – 2007, pg. 2 Support for bicycling infrastructure “Establish designated bike lanes and paths – especially north-south – within the neighborhood that will connect to major bikeways and destinations outside of the neighborhood.” Lexington-Hamline Small Area Plan – 2001, pg. 3 Values for maintaining and expanding green space “Green spaces and corridors should be encouraged in the community wherever possible, such as along railroad tracks and roads.” Merriam Park Community Plan – 2004, pg. 3 Support of local businesses “Foster a healthy environment for local businesses by developing and maintaining attractive streetscapes and buildings in cooperation with district councils and business owners.” Snelling- Hamline Neighborhood Plan – 2007, pg. 6 Value for mixed-use and transit-oriented development where appropriate (esp. along University Ave.) “Other new development along University Avenue should be mixed-use, and pedestrian scaled and oriented with buildings located close to the street edge” – Lexington-Hamline Small Area Plan – 2001, pg. 4 Disdain for traffic congestion and crime “Issues that would need to be addressed include: Traffic calming, speed and truck traffic control, and enforcement.” Snelling-Hamline Neighborhood Plan – 2007, pg. 5 Also common to most of Union Park District is the presence of University Avenue and its newly-opened Green Line LRT. Union Park contains four stations within its district boundaries at: N Lexington Parkway, Hamline Ave, Snelling Ave, and N Fairview Ave. Station Area Plans were developed to build on the Central Corridor Development Strategy (2007) which is an adopted chapter of the St. Paul Comprehensive Plan that creates a vision for how the Corridor will develop in response to the LRT. The Central Corridor Station Area Planning Process occurred between 2007 and 2008 with public roundtables, workshops, open houses, community review, and a community-based steering committee. UNION PARK CONTEXT
  • 9. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 9 UNION PARK CONTEXT Each of these station-areas has an adopted Station Area Plan which plans for approximately ¼ mile radius around each station. Each plan contains a chapter on: the existing station-area; future planned developments for the area; recommendations for improving the public realm; recommended policy directions; and implementation strategies. • Fairview Station Area Plan: http://www.stpaul. gov/DocumentCenter/Home/View/7495 • Hamline Station Area Plan: http://www.stpaul. gov/DocumentCenter/View/58989 • Snelling Station Area Plan: http://www.stpaul. gov/DocumentCenter/Home/View/7501 • Lexington Station Area Plan: http://www. stpaul.gov/DocumentCenter/Home/View/7497 • Central Corridor Development Strategy: http:// www.stpaul.gov/DocumentCenter/Home/ View/7506 • Central Corridor Station Area Planning: http:// www.stpaul.gov/DocumentCenter/Home/ View/4077 New development at Selby Ave and Snelling - Whole Foods. Sourced from TCDaily Local Business - Trotter’s Cafe. Sourced from TCDaily.
  • 10. 10 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL PARTICIPATION PROCESS OVERVIEW PARTICIPATION PROCESS OVERVIEW Introduction Julie Reiter’s presentation emphasized the challenges that the Union Park District Council faces in regards to establishing a cohesive identity for the recently merged neighborhoods of Lexington-Hamline, Snelling-Hamline, and Merriam Park. The council has struggled with establishing an identity and building community consensus among its residents. It is important for the Union Park District Council to strive to build community consensus especially in regards to identity. This collaborative planning must take place prior to implementing a participation process. Many residents have strong ties to their individual neighborhoods and have not been supportive of the merger, while some have failed to realize its establishment. This lack of identity as well as the challenge of engaging diverse and underrepresented populations of residents such as renters, minorities, students, and smaller neighborhood organizations are two of the main issues the participation process will strive to address. The Union Park District Council is currently working to create a district council 10-year plan. The 10- year plan will include a sustainable framework for engaging residents and encouraging participation. This memo addresses key steps in the planning process, key planning tasks, and key outcomes to be achieved through a program of participation. Key Steps in Planning Process If District plans are to be adopted as addendum to the Saint Paul Comprehensive Plan, planning organizations should follow specific planning guidelines as part of their process. Important process guidelines are below: 1. Request Plan Initiation Districts must first submit a work plan to St. Paul Planning and Economic Development (PED) which outlines their general goals and timeline for the document. 2. Establish a Steering Committee A steering committee of area stakeholders must be formed. The committees can be appointed by the Planning Commission and can have an appointed Planning Commissioner as co-chair, but do not necessarily have to. MERRIAM PARK UNION PARK LEX-HAM SNELL-HAM
  • 11. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 11 PARTICIPATION PROCESS OVERVIEW 3. Conduct the Planning Process The process should be publicized to the community, involve regular meetings with the Steering Committee and periodic meetings with City staff, and include at least three public meetings. 4. Prepare Draft Plan Early draft reports should be submitted to Planning staff to allow time for dialogue on important issues. After a draft plan is approved by the District Council, a final plan is submitted to the Commission for review. 5. Plan Review by Planning Commission The plan is first reviewed by the Commission’s Neighborhood Planning Committee which may suggest revisions. Subsequently, the plan is proposed to the Planning Commission for review, which will then lead to a public hearing on the plan’s adoption. After incorporating public hearing comments and revisions, the Planning Commission votes to recommend the plan to the Mayor and City Council as addendum to the Comprehensive Plan. 6. Plan Review and Adoption by City Council City Council may or may not hold an additional public hearing on adoption of the plan. Following a vote of approval by the City Council, Metropolitan Council must then review and approve the plan before final publication as addendum to the St. Paul comprehensive plan. District Plans should follow a common format derived from the St. Paul Comprehensive Plan chapters. These template sections include: Land Use, Transportation, Parks and Recreation, Housing, Water Resources, Historic Preservation, and other topics that are relevant to the area. The District Plan should be consistent with the City Comprehensive Plan but should also relate to principles of economic, environmental, and social sustainability. Existing plans and plans of adjacent areas should be respected or compatible. Key Planning Tasks The Union Park District Council has commissioned an effort to lead to a completed district council 10-year plan. This ten year plan is being required by the city of Saint Paul, as a part of this requirement the plan must address the future land use, transportation, parks and recreation, housing, water resources, and historic preservation. As a part of this planning effort, preparation for public participation included preliminary information gathering to determine relevant effects on the planning process and the 10-year plan developed. As part of this process demographic information will be collected to examine the current residents in the Union Park District Council as well as any trends of change that may be occurring. A better examination of geographic boundaries to understand socio-economic and built environment fractions within the boundaries of the district council as well as an understanding of the context by examining those activities in neighboring jurisdictions. Previous neighborhood plans should also be examined from Merriam Park, Lexington- Hamline, and Snelling-Hamline to deepen the local understanding of context by identifying both past priorities/goals but also an understanding of those who have previously been heavily involved as well as those who have been underrepresented. Once there is a common understanding of the context both with regards to past actions and plans, as well as the current situation within and surrounding the residents of the Union Park neighborhood, there must be a focus on the goals and vision of the residents of the 10-year plan. These goals and vision will be the objectives to be achieved through the 10-year plan and may include: • Zoning recommendations • Land-use priorities • Goals and vision for the bus barn redevelopment • Density along Selby • Priority of street design/right-of way for cars, buses, peds, bikes • Ayd Mill development (potentially connecting to I-94 or becoming a linear park)
  • 12. 12 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL PARTICIPATION PROCESS OVERVIEW • Housing development priorities (potentially a discussion around student housing) • Further development around/protection of The Mississippi River • Historic Preservation (West Summit) With an agreed upon set of goals and a corresponding vision for the next ten years of the Union Park there will be an identification of potential alternatives to assess their ability to meet the needs of the community. After a number of successive assessments and alternative identifications a draft ten-year plan must be published with an opportunity for the entire community to voice any remaining concerns. After a number of rounds of feedback and adjustments a final district council 10-year plan can be published and submitted to the City of Saint Paul. Key Outcomes We hope the participatory process will encourage residents of all kinds to support and personally invest in the adopted district plan. A wide range of stakeholders should be involved in the process from very early on. A popular and legitimate district plan will help the City of St. Paul to make decisions that serve its residents’ interests. In addition to having the support of the community, the plan should rest on sound data and analysis. With a clear communications strategy with effective educational parts that eschew jargon, the process can help residents understand the planning process and its ramifications. To accommodate psychological diversity, the participation activities should engage people who feel most comfortable absorbing information in tactile, kinesthetic, and spatial ways, as well as aural and visual learners. The participation process should raise awareness of the Union Park District Council, its geographic boundaries, and its powers and responsibilities. Neighbors will meet neighbors, and residents will become familiar with the issues that affect residents in different parts of the district. Accessible and inclusive events will encourage involvement by a wide range of stakeholders. By hosting fun, informal, collaborative problem-solving activities with diverse participants, the process will provide a venue for neighbors to connect on a personal level, and will encourage social integration beyond and between political blocs. By building personal connections between people who might disagree on the vision for the plan, the participation process could make room for civil disagreement. At the end of this planning task, the hope is that the community will be stronger than it was before. Conclusion This section provided a framework for the establishment of a participation process, which will guide the Union Park District Council in achieving active engagement and participation with the residents of their community. The key steps of the planning process, the key planning tasks, and the key outcomes to be achieved as covered in this memo will help to address issues the Union Park District Council has faced regarding community identity and underrepresented residents. The participation process outlined by this memo will supplement the district council’s 10 year plan by providing a framework for engaging residents and encouraging participation into the future. Grand Ole Days. Sourced from newscastic.com
  • 13. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 13 DELIVERABLE 1: Overarching Strategy & Timeline Introduction The engagement process will be highly strategic to respond to Union Park’s context. We believe a strategic and conscious effort will be most effective at instituting change through this decennial and district-wide planning effort. Overarching Strategy The general goal will be to encourage residents of all kinds to support and personally invest in the adopted district plan. A wide range of stakeholders should be involved in the process from very early on. A popular and legitimate district plan will help the City of St. Paul to make decisions that serve its residents’ interests. In addition to having the support of the community, the plan should rest on sound data and analysis. With a clear communications strategy with effective educational parts that eschew jargon, the process can help residents understand the planning process and its ramifications. To accommodate psychological diversity, the participation activities should engage people who feel most comfortable absorbing information in tactile, kinesthetic, and spatial ways, as well as aural and visual learners. The participation process should raise awareness of the Union Park District Council, its geographic boundaries, and its powers and responsibilities. Neighbors will meet neighbors, and residents will become familiar with the issues that affect residents in different parts of the district. Accessible and inclusive events will encourage involvement by a wide range of stakeholders. By hosting fun, informal, collaborative problem-solving activities with diverse participants, the process will provide a venue for neighbors to connect on a personal level, and will encourage social integration beyond and between political blocs. By building personal connections between people who might disagree on the vision for the plan, the participation process could make room for civil disagreement. At the end of this planning task, the hope is that the community will be stronger than it was before. Branding the Initiative The foremost strategic tool is a strong branding campaign for the entire engagement and plan-writing process. Branding may be default for some civic projects, and an after-thought for others –in Union Park, the branding is a context-motivated strategy that will respond to District identity apathy and historic inclusion levels. A branding initiative directly supports the following planning and political goals: • Popularly promoting awareness of the District as a local governmental entity • Leveraging the energy and resources of the District Planning effort • Promoting the engagement activities and events which are specifically designed for building community capacity and inclusion • Supporting District identity by stirring local buzz and excitement The branding strategy will be take a comprehensive approach that utilizes social media, traditional media, and physical interface. It is important that the branding campaign be more than a logo and catchphrase, but to also be well-coordinated with the planning process and District goals. We see branding as being intimately related to communications efforts, so specific communication strategies are relevant. It is recommended the District prioritize social media as a communication tool. These are easy and economical tools made effective by the presence of a student population and the proliferation of smart phone usage and internet access. Currently social media accounts are underutilized by the District - the District should complete its online and social media presence by incorporating Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube in addition to its Facebook page. Social media is particularly relevant to Union Park because it allows the District-wide community to become transparent and accessible. Social media can exhibit the District’s engagement efforts and is one way to validate the participation of residents as the process takes shape.
  • 14. 14 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL DELIVERABLE 1: Overarching Strategy & Timeline Twitter hashtags can complement the specific neighborhood issues around which many of the planning events focus on; there is opportunity to establish community forums that extend dialogue beyond the planned events. A YouTube account can feature civic and planning education, favorite neighborhood amenities, or updates and videos of the planning activities. A good example of YouTube implementation is Government of Alberta Online: https://www.youtube.com/user/YourAlberta/ featured Achieving Outcomes A series of activities can fulfill the strategic goals when a consistent message is communicated, and when the District Council is notably present within the community. Having a clear and consistent message is important. All public meetings, activities, events, and interactions should communicate the following points: • Name, logo, and boundaries of the District • Introduce the concept of the District Plan document and the planning process • Calendar dates of forthcoming engagement activities and the multiple options for residents can become involved The planning and branding campaign should be anchored by strong visibility and a physical presence of the District Council throughout the year and throughout the neighborhoods. The goal here is to integrate engagement activities and events with community life – formal presence should be maintained at local festivals, seasonal celebrations, and other neighborhood gatherings.
  • 15. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 15 DELIVERABLE 2: Design Tasks and Activities BUS BARN Introduction The bus barn site development provides an opportunity for the newly formed Union Park District Council to engage their residents in a participatory planning process. This project will likely be well established amongst media outlets, giving Union Park District Council and its residents the chance to establish a larger presence in Saint Paul and to reach out to residents through popular media. Engagement Activities: Site Specific Installation What: Site specific installations that provoke input from residents walking nearby the bus site are opportunities for gathering informal participation from the community. These installations could be simple and affordable, such as a placing banners with stickers for people to write on. The banner could state “What should this be?” This type of banner would also be replicable at other locations and at other events. Why: This type of engagement activity would promote the site as an opportunity, as something that residents can help create and form. It is affordable and provides an informal place for involvement. This activity reaches out to a demographic that may not be likely to attend public meetings or workshops. Who: Residents and anyone passing by the site. Lego Workshop What: The bus barn site has the potential to become a space for youth to recreate. It is important to consider the interests of youth. Legos are a universal language, which can also help break down language and communication barriers. Reaching out to youth at their schools would ensure active participation from a demographic that does not have the interest/opportunity to commute to an afterschool activity. Why: A lego workshop would engage people in a relaxing atmosphere, promoting constructive play and planning. Legos promote a slightly more abstract mode of operation, opening up opportunities to contemplate new and creative ideas. Who: Residents, adults, teenagers, and youth. Lego planning workshop. Sourced from teambuildingworkshop.co.uk School Curriculum Engagement Activities What: Engaging youth could become constructive especially in regards to their school education and community connectedness. This activity could provide students the opportunity to have meaningful input by reaching out to their instructors and educators to incorporate planning activities into their coursework. This may require early engagement in order to include the student’s work in the larger timeframe of planning and development. “I wish this was...” Sourced from Candy Chang
  • 16. 16 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL DELIVERABLE 2: Design Tasks & Activities School curriculum engagement activities could be incorporated into college level education as well. Engaging the colleges that surround the Union Park community by seeking their input and creative skillsets to create a site that may provide them with additional resources. Why: Our youth are an incredibly important and often undervalued resource especially in the planning community. There is great opportunity to engage students not only to generate ideas and interest in planning and the community, but also to understand what might be of value to youth. These considerations could lead to a more diverse community that may be more attractive to families and younger adults. Who: Youth - higher elementary age, junior high, and high school students, and college students, educators, and teachers. Weekend Charette What: This engagement activity would provide a more formal interaction between the district council, city planners, and interested residents. The charette would likely target a more narrow representation of the community, but would help generate many ideas in a short amount of time. These charettes could be coordinated with other neighborhood organizations, to reach out the vast network of residents. As with all activities, it is important to provide the participants with feedback, revealing the results of their work and how it may play into the larger context of the planning process. Who: Likely to engage older adults and retirees who have time to volunteer on the weekend, people who are already engaged, City/District Planners, and community leaders Event Table What: Create an event table for use at local neighborhood events to share work, information, and any ongoing developments with the community. This sort of outreach promotes awareness in the community, of the ongoing work and could also seek input from people interested in discussing. A quick table activity, games, or even “dotmocracy” could help increase the capacity of this outreach. Why: Event tables can reach residents who may not be familiar with the district and current events. It may also help promote awareness by reaching people who may not necessarily interact with the planning process. Who: Event participants, random participants, volunteers, and residents. Public Meetings What: Public meetings are a more formal and traditional means of community engagement that are required by the City of Saint Paul. These meetings are important to document the planning process and engage a more formal audience made up of professionals and residents. Although these meetings are important in regards to communication with the City of Saint Paul, they should not be considered sufficient forms of community engagement. Who: City of Saint Paul Planners, Union Park residents, and district council Public Union Park Word-Guessing Game What: This is an introduction game for the beginning of a public meeting. The audience would divide into groups of approximately ten people, and take a few minutes to think of their favorite and least favorite things in Union Park. These can be streets, businesses, parks, or local celebrities. Each person then writes these words on pieces of paper and everyone puts their paper into a basket. Each person takes turns pulling out pieces of paper and describing the words to the rest of the group. The game is cooperative within groups, and competitive between groups. The first group that guesses all of the pieces of paper in their basket wins. Why: This activity builds capacity by creating fun memories between strangers. The participants discover what their neighbors like and dislike about the neighborhood. It relies on a common game format that many people are familiar with.
  • 17. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 17 DELIVERABLE 2: Design Tasks & Activities Informal Happy Hours What: UPDC would host happy hours with experts and community leaders in all corners of the district. Invite informed guests to speak about neighborhood policy (e.g.: city planners, bicycle advocates, and cultural leaders). The guest would give a brief presentation, and answer questions from the audience. A volunteer or staff member from Union Park District Council would introduce the speaker and moderate the Q&A session. Why: The location of the event is especially important; hosting the events at neighborhood bars and coffee shops would attract many college students and younger renters. By including a question-and-answer session in the event, the events would facilitate conversation about community issues and increase civic engagement. Bringing additional business to local establishments would earn good will for the district council from small businesses. Who: Students, young renters, and Neighborhood activists AYD MILL ROAD Introduction This key neighborhood issue has been actively engaged by the Neighborhoods First! organization. This group is a focus group dedicated to the concept of developing Ayd Mill Road into a greenway linking bicyclists, walkers, and pedestrians rather than automobiles. It is important to encourage the engagement of this organization to better understand the broad scope of the issue and to generate a conversation regarding the needs of the community. Although this issue may not be perceived by the City of Saint Paul as a planning consideration, it is important to address the neighborhood’s interest and enable residents to connect with the City and express their needs and interests. Engagement Activities: “Dotmocracy” What: “Dotmocracy” is a common planning activity that quickly engages residents and provides planners with valuable information. These activities should be implemented several times throughout the community to gain input and understand the wants and needs of residents from various demographic groups and areas. This activity would be helpful, for the Ayd Mill Road issue because it could identify what residents would like to see happen with such a large, inter-neighborhood transitway. The activity may be implemented by placing posters on the wall with various street conditions. Participants then walk around to the posters and place stickers on the sheets they identify as being desirable. Placing another sheet for comments, asking participants to explain why they chose a certain street condition as desirable for the Ayd Mill Road would be beneficial to planners. Why: Dotmocracy requires little work on the part of the participant, yet it can garner much information, making it an accessible activity for all ages and education levels. Who: Residents - youth, adults, college students Where: Schools, Libraries, Community centers, Churches “Dotmocracy” exercise. Sourced from togethernorthjersey.com
  • 18. 18 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL DELIVERABLE 2: Design Tasks & Activities Mapping Exercises What: Mapping exercises such as drawing, writing, posting stickers, and route-making can be active and engaging activities, that gain input from residents. Maps provide visual context for residents to orient themselves and document planning possibilities and areas of interest. Maps provided for this activity can be simplified to limit the amount of information pertinent for the activity. In regards to the Ayd Mill Road issue, important context may include surrounding roads, interstates, bus routes, bike paths and any other transportation information. Why: Maps promote a concept of place, space, and scale to give residents and stakeholders the opportunity to be active in the planning process. Maps can reveal new opportunities that people may have not otherwise noticed. Ayd Mill Road event and Lecture Series What: Greenways and transportation are prominent issues in urban planning and planning literature. These issues have been addressed by experts and professionals who could be invited to engage in a weekend/weekday event highlighting transportation in St. Paul. Creating a lecture-series event to highlight the possibilities of Ayd Mill Road, explore the St. Paul Bikeways Plan implementation, and discuss transportation may provide important information as well as generate discussion and awareness. Bringing in speakers and professionals from around the region to discuss their experiences would promote the event as well as provide information to residents. These events could also be utilized to pressure the City of Saint paul, by providing neutral expert “testimony” Who: Experts, professionals, and educators with experience in transportation/bikeways/Saint Paul could be invited to participate in the lecture series. Where: Colleges in Union Park may be interested in participating and/or hosting the event, Coffeehouses, Schools, Libraries Weekend Charette What: Charettes are short and productive events that can help generate and develop ideas further. A charette may be more productive after the context of the issue has been discussed in public meetings, so that it is present in the minds of the community who may have already established ideas and goals for Ayd Mill Road. The charette should utilize drawings, mapping, discussion, and a site visit. It is also important to award all participants for their involvement and hard work. An awards ceremony or some other public recognition should be considered. Why: Charettes are valuable events due to their quick production of ideas and plans. These short, but intense work sessions help push projects along in a short period. The challenge of charettes is to gain a diverse group of volunteers, as many residents would not have an entire weekend to devote to the charette. Who: Residents, College students, Planners, District council members, Media - inform media of the event to increase awareness of the community’s involvement in the issue Where: The location of the charette needs to be carefully considered. Volunteers involved in the charette are often working hard for long hours and need easy access to bathrooms and other amenities such as coffee, tea, water, and food. The space should have adequate room to move around, present information, and gather as a group for discussion and interaction. Mapping Exercise. Sourced from thequeensway.org
  • 19. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 19 DELIVERABLE 2: Design Tasks & Activities SAINT PAUL BIKEWAYS PLAN Introduction The development of the St. Paul Bikeways Plan has been and ongoing planning process since community involvement in summer of 2011. The Bikeways Plan aims to designate future corridors for bicycling throughout the City of Saint Paul. This plan will be adopted as an addendum to the city’s comprehensive plan. Saint Paul districts such as Union Park have the opportunity to provide feedback and input throughout the development and implementation of this plan. “Open Streets” What: Promote awareness of the development of the City of Saint Paul Bikeways Plan through bike events such as “Open Streets.” Open Streets closes the street to vehicles, providing an interactive community environment where residents can move about freely on the street using a bicycle or walking. This event could be used to promote awareness of the city bikeways plan and the opportunity for residents to become involved in the planning and implementation in their own district. Open Streets should be promoted and organized with other special interest groups including the St. Paul Bicycle Coalition, Cycles for Change, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, Transit for Local Communities, Nice Ride, bicycle shops, and college ride-share programs. Where: Major street corridors are the most visible and are more likely to bring in a larger number of residents simply due to visual and physical presence. It is important to consider the location of the event so that it is able to stretch across the different neighborhoods within the Union Park District. Who: St. Paul Bicycle Coalition, Nice Ride, Cycles for Change, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, Residents, College students, Youth, District council members Open streets -University Ave, Saint Paul. Photo by J. Reynolds
  • 20. 20 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL DELIVERABLE 2: Design Tasks & Activities Family-Friendly Bike Rides What: Coordinate with nearby district councils to host family-friendly group rides along prospective routes for new bikeways, stopping to shop at local businesses and relax in neighborhood parks along the way. Partner with the St. Paul Bicycle Coalition, St. Paul Women on Bikes, and local business associations to publicize the event. Why: This would weave networks between healthy-living advocates, local businesses, and neighborhood activists. Neighbors would learn about new bike facilities. Gain local knowledge and input on the treatment and alignment of bike corridors. Post-It Notes Exercise What: Post-It notes are a valuable, economical tool for planning in large groups. Using post-it notes, a group can anonymously write, draw, and map their ideas, preferences. The informal quality associated with post-it notes gives participants a sense of flexibility and creative capacity, and it also limits the amount of feedback possible, so that both the participant and the planner can succinctly determine key concepts or complaints. Why: Post-it notes are affordable and versatile. They can be taken almost anywhere and posted to almost any surface without damaging it, providing a mobile engagement activity in any setting. Visual Preference Survey What: This activity could be implemented in settings beyond public meetings, such as “open streets” events, and family-friendly bicycle rides. The visual preference survey could also be implemented using software and the internet. Participants would be presented with images of different street configurations, and identify their preferences for bicycling conditions using stickers. Residents would also be able to provide feedback on potential bike corridors and areas planned for bicycling. This could be implemented using dot-stickers and drawing or placing thread on base maps. Why: This is a visual way for residents to provide input on the bicycle plan. It could be used to engage, both youth, college students, adults, and elderly residents. Post-It Note activity. Sourced from friendsofthequeensway.org
  • 21. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 21 DELIVERABLE 3: Recruitment & Retention of Participants Overview District Plans guide the city’s decisions about shared space. This plan will affect how residents and visitors move through Union Park. It will affect where people live and work by expressing a community vision for land use. Where people play and relax depends on the plan. There are big questions facing the community in the coming years: How does Union Park fit into St. Paul’s bike master plan? What should be built on the bus barn site at Snelling and University? What’s the future of Ayd Mill Road? The answers to these questions will shape Union Park and enhance the lives of the people who live there. Process is important. These questions need to be answered in a representative, transparent way. The Union Park communications strategy aims to highlight important audiences and the messages and methods with which to reach them to answer the questions posed by the district planning process. Challenges Many of the challenges facing the Union Park District Council will require using new means and methods in order to engage and communicate with new key audiences who have been underrepresented in the past. The messages communicated will need to reflect the values and goals of a newly merged district and provide a sense of opportunity and optimism. This may help enliven the planning and participation process surrounding current issues, as well as build new relationships necessary for future endeavors. Communications Strategy The communications strategy should emphasize the unity of Union Park, and the issues that its residents have in common, in order to establish a brand for this participation effort and for the district as a whole. Many different people call Union Park home, and they all share an interest in the quality of the district. The district plan will help the city manage growth, maintain the character of our neighborhoods, and ensure that the district works for everyone. The communications of the participation campaign should highlight these shared interests and values of the residents of Union Park, but it should also explore the diversity within the district. The upcoming developments will affect everyone in the area, whether they are students or senior citizens, Somali or Scandinavian. Residents, especially recent immigrants and marginalized populations, need to know that their experiences are valid and understood in the preparation of the district plan. The participation effort should reflect this wide base of experiences and enable a wide range of people to tell their stories. All District communications should be well branded - the District name, logo, and slogan should be prominent on all printed and online materials. The Council should also consider branding the planning process itself with a unique slogan, such as “Plan Union Park.” “Imagine Ayd Mill Linear Park.” Sourced from neighborhoods-first.org
  • 22. 22 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL DELIVERABLE 3: Recruitment & Retention of Participants Fresh A fresh participation process will be integral to the brand of the participation effort. Many people have a preconception that public participation is just about boring meetings in school cafeterias. In Union Park, public participation is about meeting your neighbors, playing games, and using your imagination. Public participation is about strengthening the community. Engagement activities will be active, with food, fun events, and creative opportunities. Dynamic and nontraditional techniques can engage a wider range of participants, which would result in a better plan for the district. The communication methods, as outlined in Appendix two, will have three objectives: publicize broadly, educate and inform about the District, and target specific hard-to-reach groups. The communication methods are intended to progress the broader goals of accessibility to Council governance, strengthening community relationships, and high levels of inclusion. Key Audiences The key audiences (listed in Appendix one) for Union Park have been organized into different categories including the public, media, institutions and organizations, and government. These groups represent a diverse cross-section of people who will be included in different types of communications as part of the Union Park participation process. Many of these groups are connected to each other, revealing a vast neighborhood network, which can provide valuable insight into the potential for efficient communications. Understanding these neighborhood connections may help to create an efficient communication strategy that brings different groups of people to the same table. The media are considered an important but distinct audience in the communications strategy of Union Park mainly due to their primary roles of connection and communication with the greater community. The media may be considered a tool to reach either a very general population or even special interest groups depending on the media member or organization involved. The media may also provide a means of communication with targeted audiences who may otherwise never be reached. That being said, all of the key audiences, listed in Appendix 1 are invested in the Union Park community in some manner, and have the potential to play a significant role in the participation process. Triangle Park gathering. Sourced from neighborhoods-first.org
  • 23. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 23 APPENDIX ONE: Stakeholders and Participants Stakeholders/Potential Participants: Public: Residents across: • age • ethnicity • gender • income • Renters - concentrations near the colleges (University of St. Thomas, Concordia, and between University and I-94) • Students (UST, Macalester, Concordia, Hamline) • The regulars (comfortable middle/older-aged white homeowners) • Skyline Tower • Local businesses • Midway Marketplace & business chains Media: • Pioneer Press • Highland Villager • Star Tribune • Tommiemedia - St. Thomas student newspaper • The Sword - Concordia student newspaper • MinnPost • City Pages • Blogs Institutions & Organizations: • Neighborhoods First! • University of St. Thomas - Tommiemedia, students, administration, and faculty • Religious organizations • Concordia - The Sword, students, administration, and faculty • Community Services - libraries, non-profits, Public Schools Government: • Union Park District Board • City of St. Paul • Metro Transit • Metropolitan Council - Jon Commers, District Council 14 • Ramsey County • Appendix 2 Sourced from Concordia University webpage. Sourced from Minn Post website. Sourced from Tommie media website. Sourced from Neighborhoods First! Sourced from Metropolitan Council.
  • 24. 24 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL APPENDIX TWO: Engagement Strategies Online Presence The Council is to have an active online presence throughout the engagement and planning process. This is perhaps the most practical way to reach mass audiences and communicate updated events, news, and progress on branded social media, webpages, and e-newsletters, as well as both branded and outside (i.e. streets.mn) blogs. The online presence should be fun and have a community-oriented approach to keep residents engaged while also providing a consistent and attractive representation of neighborhood and participation events This can be achieved through the use of photos and stories of relevant neighborhood people and places can make visible an area-wide community. Social media should also enable an easy level of interaction by posing questions, soliciting user uploads, or hosting forums and should focus on reaching, through targeted advertising, those who either live in or frequent the Union Park District. Face Having a “face” behind the Council is a great communication method to make residents familiar and comfortable with Council governance. Board members should have an active and formal in-person presence at community events; seasonal festivals, open streets events, and races present good opportunity to have personable interactions between Council and community. “Meet the Council” publicity events should be hosted independently or in coordination with planned community events. In addition to a human face the continuation of the branding of the Union Park District and the “Plan Union Park” process is important and should maintain similar active presence throughout the community with a continuous publication of pamphlets and billings that can be distributed to door knobs and community boards (such as those in libraries and grocery stores) in the targeted areas. Conversations To fulfill the goal for educating and informing the public about District Council governance, the communications for the planning process should simultaneously include educational and informative elements that stimulate conversations among the community. A low-budget, yet accessible communication approach may be to create a series of online videos that explain the Council system, their relationship to the City government, the plan process, and the role of Districts. These online videos also have the capability to collect feedback and comments from viewers. Union Park District Council webpage. Logos sourced from google images.
  • 25. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 25 APPENDIX THREE: Maps Como Hamline-Midway Highland Park North End Payne-Phalen Union Park Dayton's Bluff St Anthony Park Macalester-Groveland Thomas-Dale/Frogtown Generated By: Union Park Distric Council, Saint Paul, Minnesota Legend Union Park Other Distric Councils Major Roads For: ± 0 4.25 8.5 17 Miles DECEMBER 2014 The Seventeen District Councils of Saint Paul, MN are illustrated here. Summit Avenue Parkway Mississippi Gorge COUNTY ROAD 34 INTERSTATE 94 EAST COUNTY ROAD 35 INTERSTATE 94 WEST COUNTY ROAD 51 COUNTY ROAD 46 INTERSTATE 94 WEST Generated By: Transportation in Union Park Distric Council, Saint Paul, Minnesota Legend Regional Trails Transit Routes Major Roads Union Park For: ± 0 4 8 16 Miles DECEMBER 2014 Regional Trails, Major Roadways, and Transit Routes within the Councils of Saint Paul, MN are illustrated here. JUNCTION CONSULTING
  • 26. 26 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL APPENDIX THREE: Maps Generated By: Union Park Distric Council, Saint Paul, Minnesota For: ± 0 4 8 16 Miles DECEMBER 2014 The Land Use as evaluated in 2010 by the Metropolitain Council for Parcel's within the Union Park District Council of Saint Paul, MN are illustrated here. Legend Golf Course Industrial and Utility Institutitional Major Highway Mixed Use Commercial Mixed Use Industrial Mixed Use Residential Multifamily Office Open Water Park, Recreational, or Preserve Railway Retail and Other Commercial Single Family Attached Single Family Detached Undeveloped Union Park Major Roads Generated By: Union Park Distric Council, Saint Paul, Minnesota For: ± 0 4 8 16 Miles DECEMBER 2014 The Proposed Land Use as depicted by most recently propoposed Comprehensive Plan Published by the City of Saint Paul for Parcel's within the Union Park District Council of Saint Paul, MN are illustrated here. Legend Established Neighborhoods Industrial Major Institutional Major Parks & Open Space Mixed Use Corridor Open Water Park and Open Space Residential Corridor Transportation Urban Neighborhood Vehicular Right-of-Way Water Union Park Major Roads
  • 27. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 27 APPENDIX FOUR: Charts Educational Attainment Union Park Saint Paul 17,623 174,459 Population 25 Years of Age or Older Less than 9th Grade Education 66.96% 69.77% Between 9th and 12th Grade Education with no H.S. Diploma 7.63% 10.69% High School Diploma (or Equivlent) 8.26% 8.50% Some College without a Diploma 6.90% 4.44% Associate's Degree 3.32% 2.05% Bachelor's Degree 6.93% 4.56% Graduate or Professional Degree 19.89 22.02 population who have attained: Percentage of selected Rent Union Park Saint Paul 16,499 137,465 Occupied Units Paying Rent Less than $200 3.18% 3.87% $200 to $299 5.14% 5.89% $300 to $499 4.54% 7.38% $500 to $749 30.60% 27.43% $750 to $999 30.00% 28.75% $1,000 to $1,499 16.46% 21.08% $1,500 or more 10.06% 5.61% Percentage of Units Paying Rent Of: Rental Versus Owned Housing Union Park Saint Paul 12,160 111,889 52.94% 51.25% 47.06% 48.75% 2.54 2.68 1.74 2.41 Occupied Housing Units Owner Occupied UInits Renter Occupied Units Average household size of owner-occupied unit Average household size of renter occupied unit Education Enrolment Union Park Saint Paul 10,021 87,862 Population 3 years and over enrolled in school Nursery School/Preschool 4.40% 6.06% Kindergarden 2.85% 4.53% Elementary School (Grades 1-8) 20.69% 33.76% High School (Grades 9-12) 10.06% 19.34% College or Graduate School 62.00% 36.31% Percentage of enrolled Population attending: Union Park Saint Paul Labor Force Participation 24,076 222,151 74.13% 70.22% 74.12% 70.17% 69.26% 63.17% 4.86% 7.00% 0.01% 0.04% Population 16 Years of Age and Over In Labor Force In Civilian Labor Force Employed in Civilian Workforce In Civilian Workforce but Unemployed Employed by Armed Forces Not in Labor Force 25.87% 29.78%
  • 28. 28 JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL APPENDIX FOUR: Charts Household Income Total Households Commute Methods For Workers Housing Structures Union Park Saint Paul 12,995 120,653 Total Housing Units 1-Unit Detached Structure 49.73% 49.50% 1-Unit Atached Structure 2.18% 4.60% 2 Units in Structure 5.73% 7.34% 3-4 Units in Structure 5.49% 4.24% 5-9 Units in Structure 5.73% 4.15% 10-19 Units in Structure 12.46% 8.41% 20 or more Units in Structure 18.55% 21.36% Mobile Homes as Unit 0.13% 0.34% Boat, RV, or Van as unit 0.00% 0.05% Poplulation who was foreign born and born Structure of Housing Units: Union Park 28,716 In the United States 91.90% In Minnesota 60.47% In the United States but outside of Minnesota 31.44% Outsideof the 50 States to American Parents 1.30% Abroad 6.79% Naturalized United States Citizen 3.12% Not a United States Citizen 3.68% Entered the United States Since 2010 0.29% Entered the United States Before 2010 6.51% Europe 1.18% Asia 2.29% Africa 1.85% Oceinia 0.02% Latin America 1.19% North America, but outside of United States 0.25% Percentage of Poplulation who was foreign born and: Percentage of in: Nationality Total Population Percentage of Population who were born: Union Park Saint Paul 12,160 111,889 Less than $10,000 10.10% 10.34% $10,000 to $14,999 4.31% 5.79% $15,000 to $24,999 10.61% 11.57% $25,000 to $34,999 8.83% 11.39% $35,000 to $49,999 12.99% 14.14% $50,000 to $74,999 13.96% 17.58% $75,000 to $99,999 10.60% 11.64% $100,000 to $149,999 13.20% 10.41% $150,000 to $199,999 7.45% 3.64% $200,000 or more 7.95% 3.50% 80,139.63 61,035.81 Percentage of Household of Income and Benefits (In 2012 Inflation-Adjusted Dollars): Average Income Union Park Saint Paul 16,499 137,465 Drive Alone 66.96% 69.77% Carpool 7.63% 10.69% Utilize Public Transit 8.26% 8.50% Walk 6.90% 4.44% Other Means 3.32% 2.05% Work From Home 6.93% 4.56% 19.89 22.02 Workers 16 Years of Age and Older Percentage of workers who: Average Travel Time to work
  • 29. JUNCTION CONSULTING UNION PARK PROPOSAL 29 APPENDIX FIVE: Sources City of Saint Paul MN. 2014. 16 October 2014. <http://www.stpaul.gov/>. Union Park District Council. 2014. 16 October 2014. <http://www.unionparkdc.org/>. Millet, Larry. “AIA Guide to the Twin Cities: The Essential Source on the Architecture of Minneapolis and St. Paul.” Minnesota Historical Society, 2007. 502. Shilling, Andrew. “QueensWay Workshop Brings Park One Step Closer.” Queens Ledger. March 26, 2014. http://www.queensledger.com/view/full_story/24819175/article-QueensWay-workshop-brings-park-space- one-step-closer Wanner, Diane. District Council. 2014. 16 October 2014. <http://www.stpaul.gov/index.aspx?NID=1859>.