NZQA Scholarship Art History Slideshow (Quotes)

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NZQA Scholarship Art History Slideshow (Quotes)

  1. 1. Art History Slides<br />
  2. 2. Adoration of the Magi - Botticelli - 1475 <br />
  3. 3. Primavera - Botticelli - 1482 <br />
  4. 4. Birth of Venus - Botticelli - 1486 <br />
  5. 5. Ginevrade’Benci - Leonardo Da Vinci - 1476 <br />
  6. 6. Virgin of the Rocks - Leonardo Da Vinci - c1483 - Louvre <br />
  7. 7. “Where the spirit does not work with the hand there is no art.” – Da Vinci<br />
  8. 8. Last Supper - Leonardo Da Vinci - 1495<br />
  9. 9. “The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions.” – Da Vinci<br />
  10. 10. Mona Lisa - Leonardo Da Vinci - 1503-05<br />
  11. 11. “A good painter has two main objects to paint, man and the intention of his soul. The former is easy, the latter hard as he has to represent it by the attitude and movement of the limbs.” – Da Vinci<br />
  12. 12. Virgin and Child with St.Anne - Leonardo Da Vinci - 1510<br />
  13. 13. Battle of the Centaurs - Michelangelo - c1492<br />
  14. 14. “forzadilevare”- Michelangelo (force of taking away) <br />
  15. 15. Pieta - Michelangelo - 1499<br />
  16. 16. “Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.” - Michelangelo <br />
  17. 17. David - Michelangelo - 1501-04<br />
  18. 18. DoniTondo - Michelangelo - 1503<br />
  19. 19. “Good painting is the kind that looks like sculpture.” - Michelangelo <br />
  20. 20. Creation of Adam (Detail from Sistine Ceiling) - Michelangelo - 1508-12<br />
  21. 21. The Last Judgement - Michelangelo - 1534-41 (Biagio de Cesena)<br />
  22. 22. Marriage of the Virgin - Raphael - 1504<br />
  23. 23. Agnolo/MaddalenaDoni - Raphael - 1506<br />
  24. 24. School of Athens - Raphael - 1510<br />
  25. 25. Fire In The Borgo - Raphael/Giulio Romano - 1514<br />
  26. 26. Baldassare Castiglione - Raphael - 1515<br />
  27. 27. Leo X with two Cardinals - Raphael - 1518<br />
  28. 28. The Transfiguration - Raphael - 1519<br />
  29. 29. St. Marks Body Brought To Venice - Tintoretto - 1548<br />
  30. 30. The Last Supper - Tintoretto - 1594<br />
  31. 31. Deposition from the Cross/Entombment - Pontormo - c1525<br />
  32. 32. Starry Night Over The Rhone - Van Gogh - 1888<br />
  33. 33. Vision After The Sermon - Gauguin - 1888<br />
  34. 34. Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? - Gauguin - 1897<br />
  35. 35. Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte - Seurat - 1884<br />
  36. 36. The Papal Palace, Avignon - Signac - 1900<br />
  37. 37. Luxe, Calme et Volupte - Matisse - 1904<br />
  38. 38. “I cannot copy nature in a servile way; I am forced to interpret nature and submit it to the spirit of the picture. From the relationship I have found in all the tones there must result a living harmony of colors, a harmony analogous to that of a musical composition.” – Henri Matisse<br />
  39. 39. The Open Window - Matisse - 1905<br />
  40. 40. “Whether we want to or not, we belong to our time and we share in its opinions, its feelings, even its delusions. All artists bear the imprint of their time, but the great artists are those in whom this is most profoundly marked.” – Henri Matisse<br />
  41. 41. The Joy of Life - Matisse - 1905-06<br />
  42. 42. “The role of the artist, like that of the scholar, consists of seizing current truths often repeated to him, but which will take on new meaning for him and which he will make his own when he has grasped their deepest significance.” – Henri Matisse<br />
  43. 43. Harmony In Red - Matisse - 1908<br />
  44. 44. “I simply try to put down colors which render my sensation” – Henri Matisse<br />
  45. 45. The Red Studio - Matisse - 1911<br />
  46. 46. “But the thought of a painter must not be considered as separate from his pictorial means” – Henri Matisse<br />
  47. 47. Mountains at Collioure - Derain - 1905<br />
  48. 48. “I use colour as a means of expressing my emotion and not as a transcription of nature” – Derain<br />
  49. 49. Charing Cross Bridge - Derain - 1906<br />
  50. 50. “The visible world is a great deal less interesting than the world re-imagined through colour” - Derain<br />
  51. 51. The Turning Road - Derain - 1906<br />
  52. 52. Restaurant de la Machine a Bougival - Vlaminck - 1905<br />
  53. 53. “What I could have done in real life only by throwing a bomb which would have led to the scaffold I tried to achieve in painting by using color of maximum purity. In this way I satisfied my urge to destroy old conventions, to disobey in order to re-create a tangible, living, and liberated world.” - Vlaminck<br />
  54. 54. The River Siene At Chatou- Vlaminck - 1906<br />
  55. 55. Street, Dresden - Kirchner - 1908<br />
  56. 56. “We want to wrest from the comfortably established older generation freedom to live and move. Anyone who directly and honestly reproduces that force which impels him to create belongs to us.” – Ernst Kirchner (Die Brucke Manifesto)<br /> <br />
  57. 57. Naked Playing People - Kirchner - 1910<br />
  58. 58. “A painter paints the appearance of things, not their objective correctness, in fact he creates new appearances of things.” – Ernst Kirchner<br />
  59. 59. NollendorfPlatz - Kirchner - 1912<br />
  60. 60. “All true artists, whether they know it or not, create from a place of no-mind, from inner stillness.” – Ernst Kirchner<br />
  61. 61. PotsdamerPlatz - Kirchner - 1914<br />
  62. 62. “My paintings are allegories not portraits” – Ernst Kirchner<br />
  63. 63. Brandenburger Tor - Kirchner - 1915<br />
  64. 64. WeissesHaus In Dangast - Heckel - 1908<br />
  65. 65. Portrait of a Man - Heckel - 1919<br />
  66. 66. Two Women - Schmidt-Rottluff - 1912<br />
  67. 67. Sonnenuntergang / Strombrücke in Leba - Pechstein - 1921<br />
  68. 68. The Blue Rider - Kandinsky - 1903<br />
  69. 69. “Are these human figures an absolute necessity to the composition, or should they be replaced by other forms, and that without affecting the fundamental harmony” – Wassily Kandinsky<br />
  70. 70. The Blue Mountain - Kandinsky - 1908<br />
  71. 71. “There is no ‘must’ in art, because art is free” – Wassily Kandinsky<br />
  72. 72. Untitled (First Abstract Watercolour) - Kandinsky - 1910<br />
  73. 73. “The more abstract is form, the more clear and direct its appeal.” – Wassily Kandinsky<br />
  74. 74. Lyrical - Kandinsky - 1911<br />
  75. 75. &quot;Colour is the key. The eye is the hammer. The soul is the piano with its many chords. The artist is the hand that, by touching this or that key, sets the soul vibrating automatically.&quot;– Wassily Kandinsky<br />
  76. 76. All Saints - Kandinsky - 1911<br />
  77. 77. “The problem of harmonizing the appeal of the material and the non-material” – Wassily Kandinsky <br />
  78. 78. Composition VI - Kandinsky - 1913<br />
  79. 79. “The more frightening the world becomes ... the more art becomes abstract.&quot; – Wassily Kandinsky<br />
  80. 80. Composition VIII - Kandinsky - 1923<br />
  81. 81. &quot;Each period of a civilization creates an art that is specific in it and which we will never see reborn. To try and revive the principles of art of past centuries can lead only to the production of stillborn works.&quot; – Wassily Kandinsky <br />
  82. 82. The Wolves/Balkan War - Marc - 1913<br />
  83. 83. “Today we are searching for things in nature that are hidden behind the veil of appearance... We look for and paint this inner, spiritual side of nature.” – Franz Marc <br />
  84. 84. The Fate of The Animals - Marc - 1913<br />
  85. 85. “Blue is the male principle, stern and spiritual. Yellow the female principle, gentle, cheerful and sensual. Red is matter, brutal and heavy and always the colour which must be fought and vanquished by the other two.” – Franz Marc <br />
  86. 86. Fighting Forms - Marc - 1914<br />
  87. 87. “Art is nothing but the expression of our dream; the more we surrender to it the closer we get to the inner truth of things, our dream-life, the true life that scorns questions and does not see them.” – Franz Marc <br />
  88. 88. Meditation - Münter - 1917<br />
  89. 89. The City - Grosz - 1916<br />
  90. 90. Night - Beckmann - 1919<br />
  91. 91. Survivors - Kollwitz - 1923<br />
  92. 92. On A Motif From Hamamet - Klee - 1914<br />
  93. 93. “Art does not reproduce what we see; rather, it makes us see.” – Paul Klee<br />
  94. 94. Ad Parnassum - Klee - 1932<br />
  95. 95. “Color possesses me. I don&apos;t have to pursue it. It will possess me always, I know it. That is the meaning of this happy hour: Color and I are one. I am a painter.” – Paul Klee <br />
  96. 96. The Sacrifice of Iphigenia - Rothko - 1942<br />
  97. 97. “If our titles recall the known myths of antiquity, we have used them again because they are the eternal symbols upon which we must fall back to express basic psychological ideas.” – Mark Rothko <br />
  98. 98. Orange and Yellow - Rothko - 1956<br />
  99. 99. “I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” – Mark Rothko<br />
  100. 100. Black On Maroon - Rothko - 1959<br />
  101. 101. “I paint very large pictures. I realize that historically the function of painting large pictures is painting something very grandiose and pompous. The reason I paint them, however – I think it applies to other painters I know – is precisely because I want to be very intimate and human. To paint a small picture is to place yourself outside your experience. However you paint the larger picture, you are in it.” – Mark Rothko <br />
  102. 102. Untitled (Brown and Grey) - Rothko - 1969<br />
  103. 103. “Painting is a language for exchange of truths about needs.” – Mark Rothko<br />
  104. 104. Onement I<br />Newman<br />1948<br />
  105. 105. “Any art worthy of its name should address &apos;life&apos;, &apos;man&apos;, &apos;nature&apos;, &apos;death&apos; and &apos;tragedy&apos;.” – Barnett Newman <br />
  106. 106. Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue?<br />Newman<br />1966<br />
  107. 107. “To produce important art it is necessary as a rule to digest the major art of the preceding period, or periods.” – Clement Greenberg (American-Type Painting)<br />
  108. 108. Voice of Fire <br />Newman<br />1967<br />
  109. 109. “And it is understood, I hope, that tradition is not dismantled by the avant-garde for sheer revolutionary effect, but in order to maintain the level and vitality of art under the steadily changing circumstances of the last hundred years” – Clement Greenberg (American-Type Painting)<br />
  110. 110. 1957 D1 - Still - 1957<br />
  111. 111. &quot;I am not interested in illustrating my time. A man&apos;s &quot;time&quot; limits him, it does not truly liberate him. Our age - it is one of science, of mechanism, of power and death. I see no point in adding to its mechanism of power and death. I see no point in adding to its mammoth arrogance the compliment of a graphic homage.” – Clyfford Still<br />
  112. 112. Beginning - Noland - 1958<br />
  113. 113. New York, NY<br />Kline<br />1953<br />
  114. 114. “The final test of a painting, theirs, mine, any other, is: does the painter&apos;s emotions come across?” – Franz Kline<br />
  115. 115. Elegy To The Spanish Republic No. 110 - Motherwell - 1971<br />
  116. 116. The She Wolf - Pollock - 1943<br />
  117. 117. “The painting has a life of its own.” – Jackson Pollock<br />
  118. 118. No. 5<br />Pollock<br />1948<br />
  119. 119. “On the floor I am more at ease. I feel nearer, more a part of the painting, since this way I can walk around it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting.” – Jackson Pollock <br />
  120. 120. Blue Poles - Pollock - 1952<br />
  121. 121. “When I&apos;m painting, I&apos;m not aware of what I&apos;m doing. It&apos;s only after a get acquainted period that I see what I&apos;ve been about.” – Jackson Pollock<br />
  122. 122. Legend and Fact - De Kooning - 1940<br />
  123. 123. “Whatever an artist&apos;s personal feelings are, as soon as an artist fills a certain area on the canvas or circumscribes it, he becomes historical. He acts from or upon other artists.” – Willem De Kooning<br />
  124. 124. Excavation - De Kooning - 1950<br />
  125. 125. “I make pictures and someone comes in and calls it art.” – Willem De Kooning<br />
  126. 126. Woman V - De Kooning - 1952<br />
  127. 127. Flag - Johns - 1954<br />
  128. 128. “Everyone is of course free to interpret the work in his own way. I think seeing a picture is one thing and interpreting it is another.” – Jasper Johns<br />
  129. 129. Three Flags - Johns - 1958<br />
  130. 130. Map - Johns - 1961<br />
  131. 131. “When something is new to us, we treat it as an experience. We feel that our senses are awake and clear. We are alive.” – Jasper Johns<br />
  132. 132. Canyon - Rauschenberg - 1959<br />
  133. 133. Erased De Kooning - Rauschenberg - 1953<br />
  134. 134. “An empty canvas is full.” – Robert Rauschenberg <br />
  135. 135. Portrait of Iris Clert - Rauschenberg - 1961<br />
  136. 136. Retroactive I - Rauschenberg - 1964<br />
  137. 137. “The artist&apos;s job is to be a witness to his time in history.” – Robert Rauschenberg<br />
  138. 138. Campbell Soup Cans - Warhol - 1962<br />
  139. 139. Triple Elvis - Warhol - 1963<br />
  140. 140. Brillo Boxes - Warhol - 1964<br />
  141. 141. “Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.” – Andy Warhol <br />
  142. 142. Drowning Girl - Lichtenstein - 1963<br />
  143. 143. Whaam! - Lichtenstein - 1963<br />
  144. 144. Brushstroke - Lichtenstein - 1965<br />
  145. 145. Self Portrait - Lichtenstein - 1978<br />
  146. 146. The Dinner Party - Chicago - 1974<br />
  147. 147. “Do I even think about myself as a woman when I go to make art? Of course not. “ – Judy Chicago<br />
  148. 148. Judith Slaying Holofernes - Gentileschi - 1614<br />
  149. 149. Nighthawks - Hopper - 1942<br />
  150. 150. Lucas - Close - 1942<br />

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