Phytonutrients 101Part 1Presented by:Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education
Phytonutrients 101Part 1:• Basics of phytonutrients• Phytonutrient families• Benefits of taking phytonutrients• Studies su...
• Recommendation to eat a wide variety of coloredfruits & vegetables on a daily basis• National health goals:– 75% of popu...
What is a Serving?Vegetables = 1 cupGoal: 2 to 3 cups (4 to 6 servings)• Broccoli = 3 spears• Greens (e.g., kale, spinach)...
What are Phytonutrients?• “Phyto” or plant chemicals found infruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, teas, legumes and spices.• ...
Interesting Things about PhytonutrientsWhere do Autumn leaves gettheir color from?• Chlorophyll — green color• Carotenoids...
CAROTENOIDS(CVD & CancerProtection)PHENOLICS ALKALOIDSNITROGEN-CONTAININGCOMPOUNDSORGANOSULFURCOMPOUNDSIsothiocyanatesIndo...
Vitamin A & Carotenoids
Health Benefits of Phytonutrients• Unlike vitamins & minerals, phytonutrients are not essential to life butboost overall h...
Health Benefits of Phytonutrients• Phytonutrients exert a wide range of beneficial effects. When consumed, thesehealth ben...
Antioxidants, Free-Radicals & Aging• Free-radicals are unstable oxygen molecules• Free-radicals associated with diseases s...
ORAC Scores
Anti-Inflammatory Benefits• Chronic or “silent” inflammation goes largely unnoticed but levels ofinflammatory chemicals be...
Phytonutrient Color Groups
Phytonutrient Gap• Population studies consistently show thatregular consumption of fruits andvegetables is associated with...
PhytonutrientsPhytonutrient Fruits & Veggies Color Group Health BenefitsAnthocyanidinsProanthocyanidinsBlueberries, blackb...
PhytonutrientsPhytonutrient Fruits & Veggies Color Group Health BenefitsAlpha-caroteneBeta-caroteneBeta-cryptoxanthinPumpk...
Skin Health & Phytonutrients• Maintenance of healthy-looking skin:– Improvement in skin structure– Improvement in microcir...
Studies: Skin Pigment & Perceived Health• A diet rich in carotenoidsincreases skin yellowness, whichis perceived to be mor...
Studies: Food Intake & Skin Wrinkling• 453 men & women, age 70+ years, Caucasianwith different ethnic origins(Greek, Austr...
Studies: Carotenoids, Vitamin E & UV Light• 20 healthy subjects, aged 20-57 yearsexposed to different levels of UV light a...
Studies: Lutein & Skin Health• 40 female healthy subjects, aged 20-50 yearsof varying skin types, with signs of prematurea...
Studies: Phytonutrients & Skin Structure• 39 adults, average age 42 years, with normalskin• Two treatment groups:– Lycopen...
Studies: Fruit/Veggie Concentrate & Skin Microcirculation• 52, healthy women, with normal to dryskin, aged 40-65 years adu...
Contact InformationDavid H. Rahm, M.D.President and Medical DirectorCell Phone: 310-683-3444; Toll Free: 888-367-8605 ext ...
Phytonutrients 101Part 2Presented by:Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education
Phytonutrients 101Part 1:• Basics of phytonutrients• Phytonutrient families• Benefits of taking phytonutrients• Studies su...
Phytonutrient Products
Phytonutrient Considerations• Product health objective• Single vs. multi ingredient formulation and amounts used• Formulat...
Our Approach
Phytonutrient Branded IngredientsBetatene®• Natural mixed carotenoid blend• Contains beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein...
• Formulated with fruits, vegetables, spices & teafrom the 5 major color groups.• Features acai, cranberry, pomegranate, p...
Phyto-5Blue-PurpleYellow-OrangeGreenRed-PinkWhite
• Curcuma is a compound extracted from theCurcuma longa root• Member of the ginger family• Active constituent in the spice...
• Brand name for the active constituent found incinnamon, extracted using a proprietary processthat filters out the toxins...
• Gingerol is the active constituent that gives theginger root its distinctive flavor• Due to its powerful anti-inflammato...
• Rooibus tea is made from the fermented and driedleaves and twigs of the Rooibus, or red bush, aflowering shrub native to...
Phyto-5 Phytonutrient ComplexPart of Age Management Regimen• Covers gaps in the diet when 5-9 servingsof fruits & veggies ...
Contact InformationDavid H. Rahm, M.D.President and Medical DirectorCell Phone: 310-683-3444; Toll Free: 888-367-8605 ext ...
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Phytonutrients 101 - Presented by: Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education of VitaMedica

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Phytonutrients 101 - Presented by: Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education of VitaMedica

http://www.VitaMedica.com

Presented by:
Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education

Part 1:
Basics of phytonutrients
Phytonutrient families
Benefits of taking phytonutrients
Studies supporting phytonutrients for skin health

Part 2:
How to select a phytonutrient supplement
Phyto-5 features & benefits

More Information On: http://www.VitaMedica.com
Presented by: Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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  • Tree and plant leaves contain pigments that give them their color. Three pigments are involved in fall color:Chlorophyll — gives leaves their green colorCarotenoids — provide the yellow, orange, and brown colorsAnthocyanins — give the red and purple colorsDuring the growing season, most tree leaves are green because they are full of chlorophyll. Plants use chlorophyll to capture sunlight for photosynthesis, the process that enables them to manufacture their own food. The amount of chlorophyll is so high during the summer that the green color masks all other pigments present in the leaf. In contrast to the other two pigments, anthocyanins are produced in the autumn, in response to bright light and excess plant sugars in the leaf cells. As the days grow shorter in the fall, chlorophyll production slows down and eventually stops. The carotenoids and anthocyanins that are present in the leaf then become visible.
  • Actinic keratosis: A small rough spot on skin chronically exposed to the sun, precancerous, can develop into a skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, a process that typically takes years. Actinic keratoses occur most frequently in fair-skinned people. Common locations are the face, scalp, back of the neck, upper chest, forearm and back of the hand. Prevention is by minimizing sun exposure. Treatments include cryosurgery (freezing them with liquid nitrogen), cutting them away, burning them, putting 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on them, and photodynamic therapy (which involves injecting into the bloodstream a chemical that collects in actinic keratoses and makes them more sensitive to exposure to a specialized form of light).
  • Actinic keratosis: A small rough spot on skin chronically exposed to the sun, precancerous, can develop into a skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, a process that typically takes years. Actinic keratoses occur most frequently in fair-skinned people. Common locations are the face, scalp, back of the neck, upper chest, forearm and back of the hand. Prevention is by minimizing sun exposure. Treatments include cryosurgery (freezing them with liquid nitrogen), cutting them away, burning them, putting 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on them, and photodynamic therapy (which involves injecting into the bloodstream a chemical that collects in actinic keratoses and makes them more sensitive to exposure to a specialized form of light).
  • Actinic keratosis: A small rough spot on skin chronically exposed to the sun, precancerous, can develop into a skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, a process that typically takes years. Actinic keratoses occur most frequently in fair-skinned people. Common locations are the face, scalp, back of the neck, upper chest, forearm and back of the hand. Prevention is by minimizing sun exposure. Treatments include cryosurgery (freezing them with liquid nitrogen), cutting them away, burning them, putting 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on them, and photodynamic therapy (which involves injecting into the bloodstream a chemical that collects in actinic keratoses and makes them more sensitive to exposure to a specialized form of light).
  • Phytonutrients 101 - Presented by: Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education of VitaMedica

    1. 1. Phytonutrients 101Part 1Presented by:Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education
    2. 2. Phytonutrients 101Part 1:• Basics of phytonutrients• Phytonutrient families• Benefits of taking phytonutrients• Studies supporting phytonutrients for skin healthPart 2:• How to select a phytonutrient supplement• Phyto-5 features & benefits
    3. 3. • Recommendation to eat a wide variety of coloredfruits & vegetables on a daily basis• National health goals:– 75% of population consume daily 2+servings of fruit– 50% of population consume daily 3+servings of vegetables• Americans are falling considerably short ofnational health goals:– 32.8% of adults consume 2+ servings of fruit– 27.4% of adults consume 3+ servings ofvegetables– 14% of adults consume both 2+ servings offruit and 3+ servings of vegetablesFruit & Vegetable ConsumptionSource: HHS Healthy People 2010 and Healthy People 2020; CDC State Indicator Report 2009
    4. 4. What is a Serving?Vegetables = 1 cupGoal: 2 to 3 cups (4 to 6 servings)• Broccoli = 3 spears• Greens (e.g., kale, spinach) = 1 cupcooked; 2 cups raw• Sweet Potato = 1 large baked• Dry Beans & Peas = 1 cup cooked• Corn = 1 large ear• Tomatoes = 1 large raw• Carrots = 2 mediumFruit = 1 cupGoal: 1½ to 2 cups (3 to 4 servings)• Apple = 1 small• Grapes = 1 cup• Orange = 1 large• Pear = 1 medium• Strawberries = 3 medium• Watermelon = 1 small wedge• Dried Fruit = ½ cup dried• 100% Fruit Juice = 1 cup
    5. 5. What are Phytonutrients?• “Phyto” or plant chemicals found infruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, teas, legumes and spices.• Responsible for giving plants their color. Nutrients that protect the plant from harmfuloxidation, viruses, bacteria, parasites and insects.• Generally, the darker the fruit or vegetable the higher the phytonutrient content. Exceptionis white vegetables like onion and cauliflower.• Over 5,000 phytochemicals identified. Some plants contain a wide variety of phytonutrients(kale, acai, berries); others contain a smaller number at concentrated levels (e.g., tomato).• Preparation of phytonutrient-rich foods affects their nutritional value:– The nutritional content of some foods increases when steamed, boiled or heatedExamples: tomatoes, broccoli, peppers, potatoes, carrots and spinach– Peeling certain fruits & vegetables decreases their nutritional content as phytonutrientsare concentrated in brightly colored skin e.g., grape skins
    6. 6. Interesting Things about PhytonutrientsWhere do Autumn leaves gettheir color from?• Chlorophyll — green color• Carotenoids — yellow,orange, and brown colors• Anthocyanins — red andpurple colors
    7. 7. CAROTENOIDS(CVD & CancerProtection)PHENOLICS ALKALOIDSNITROGEN-CONTAININGCOMPOUNDSORGANOSULFURCOMPOUNDSIsothiocyanatesIndolesGlucosinolatesAllylic sulfides(broccoli, garlic, onions)Alpha-caroteneBeta-caroteneCryptoxanthinLuteinZeaxanthinAstaxanthinLycopenePhenolic acids Flavonoids Stilbenoids(resveratrol)Coumarins(cinnamon, clover)TanninsHydroxybenzoic acidsHydroxycinnamic acids(green tea, coffee,whole grains)Flavonols(onions, apples)Flavones(sweet red pepper)Flavanols(dark fruits, nutskins, tea, cocoa)Flavanones(citrus fruits)Anthocyanidins(dark fruits, redwine)Isoflavonoids(soy beans)Chlorogenic acidCinnamic acidEllagic acidGallic acidRosmarinic acidSalicylic acidFerulic acidCaffeic acidRutinQuercetinKaempferolMyricetinApigeninLuteolinTangeritinCatechinEpicatechinEpigallocatechinEpicatechinGallateEpigallocatechinHesperitinNaringeninCyanidinMalvidinGenisteinDaidzeinPHYTONUTRIENTSPolyphenols = flavonoids and non-flavonoids(Protect Cellular Damage)Flavan-3-ols/ Proanthocyanidins/OPCs
    8. 8. Vitamin A & Carotenoids
    9. 9. Health Benefits of Phytonutrients• Unlike vitamins & minerals, phytonutrients are not essential to life butboost overall health and prevent chronic disease– May reduce risk for diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease• Boost brain’s function, support immune system and promoteheart, eye, skin and bone health• Different phytonutrients work in different parts of the body:– Lutein is deposited in the eye and helps prevent against ARMD– Lycopene is deposited in heart tissue– Soy isoflavones are incorporated into breast tissue
    10. 10. Health Benefits of Phytonutrients• Phytonutrients exert a wide range of beneficial effects. When consumed, thesehealth benefits are conferred to us:– Serve as antioxidants– Enhance immune response– Enhance cell-to-cell communication– Alter estrogen metabolism– Convert to vitamin A (e.g., beta-carotene)– Cause cancer cells to die (apoptosis)– Repair DNA damage caused by smoking and other toxic exposures– Detoxify carcinogens through activation of the cytochrome P450 and Phase IIenzyme systems• Phytonutrients are most known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatorybenefits
    11. 11. Antioxidants, Free-Radicals & Aging• Free-radicals are unstable oxygen molecules• Free-radicals associated with diseases such as cancer, heartdisease and stroke• Free-radical theory of aging (program vs. damage)• Innate mechanisms for eliminating free-radicals and protectthe body from oxidative damage– antioxidant compounds (vitamin C, vitamin E) and phytonutrients– enzymes (glutathione peroxidase)
    12. 12. ORAC Scores
    13. 13. Anti-Inflammatory Benefits• Chronic or “silent” inflammation goes largely unnoticed but levels ofinflammatory chemicals become elevated• A chemical marker in the blood, C-reactive protein, is a good indicator ofthe body’s level of chronic inflammation• Silent inflammation is an underlying cause of many diseases and chronicconditions e.g., cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer• Consuming anti-inflammatory foods inhibits the production ofinflammatory compounds– Phytonutrient-rich foods including fruits, vegetables, nuts, wholegrains & spices
    14. 14. Phytonutrient Color Groups
    15. 15. Phytonutrient Gap• Population studies consistently show thatregular consumption of fruits andvegetables is associated with:– Reduced risk of cardiovasculardisease including heart attack &stroke– May be protective against certaintypes of cancer• Fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nutsand teas are rich sources of fiber,vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients• With 80% of Americans not eatingadequate amount & variety of fruits &vegetables, results in a “phytonutrientgap”America’s Phytonutrient Report, Nutrilite, 2009
    16. 16. PhytonutrientsPhytonutrient Fruits & Veggies Color Group Health BenefitsAnthocyanidinsProanthocyanidinsBlueberries, blackberries, plums,cranberries, raspberries, redonions, red potatoes, redradishes, strawberries- Potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory- Improve integrity of supportstructures in veins & vascularsystem- Enhance effects of vitamin C- Improve capillary integrity- Stabilize collagen matrix- Inhibit mechanisms of cancer celldevelopmentResveratrol Red & purple grapes, darkberries, acai berry, goji berry,peanuts (with skin), red wine,cocoa powder- Potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory- Accounts for “French Paradox”- Life extension in animal studies- Promotes heart & eye health- Metabolic syndrome benefitsEllagic Acid Raspberries, strawberries,pomegranates, cranberries,walnuts- Potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory- May reduce the risk of certaincancersLycopene Tomatoes and cooked tomatoproducts, watermelon, pinkgrapefruit, guava, papaya, redpeppers- Potent antioxidant- Associated with reduced risk ofcancers- Protection against heart attack
    17. 17. PhytonutrientsPhytonutrient Fruits & Veggies Color Group Health BenefitsAlpha-caroteneBeta-caroteneBeta-cryptoxanthinPumpkin, sweet potato, carrots,winter squash, cantaloupe,apricots, spinach, collard greens,kale, broccoli- Antioxidant- Pre-cursors to Vitamin A- Vision, immune function, skin andbone healthLuteinZeaxanthinCollard greens, kale, spinach,broccoli, Brussels sprouts,lettuces, artichoke, corn- Antioxidant- May prevent and slow ARMD- Protect the skin from UV light- Reduces risk of heart disease &some cancersIndolesIsothiocyanatesBroccoli, Brussels sprouts,cabbage, kale, cauliflower- Anti-cancer properties- Boosts DNA repair in cells; blockscancer cell growthSulforaphane Broccoli, Brussels sprouts,cabbage, kale, cauliflower- Chemoprotection- Lowers blood cholesterol levelsAllicinAlliinDithiinsGarlic, onions, shallots, chives,leeks- Cardiovascular benefit in loweringLDL cholesterol & reducing plateletaggregation- Anti-viral, antibacterial and anti-fungal properties- Protection against cancer
    18. 18. Skin Health & Phytonutrients• Maintenance of healthy-looking skin:– Improvement in skin structure– Improvement in microcirculation• Protection against aging:– Enhanced skin photoprotection to prevent photo-oxidative damage tocellular lipids, proteins and DNA– Improvement in skin hydration, skin lipid content, skin elasticity– Reduction in skin wrinkling
    19. 19. Studies: Skin Pigment & Perceived Health• A diet rich in carotenoidsincreases skin yellowness, whichis perceived to be more healthfulthan tanned or lighter coloredskin• Individuals with higher dietaryintakes of carotenoids and fruitand vegetables have increasedskin yellowness valuesCarotenoid and melanin pigment coloration affect perceived human health, Evolution and Human Behavior, Dec 2010
    20. 20. Studies: Food Intake & Skin Wrinkling• 453 men & women, age 70+ years, Caucasianwith different ethnic origins(Greek, Australian, Swedish)• Food & nutrient intakes assessed for previousyear using Food Frequency Questionnaire• Less actinic skin damage (back of hand) wasassociated with higher intake ofvegetables, legumes, fish, fermented milkproducts, olive oil• Combination of olive oil may assist in theabsorption of fat-soluble antioxidant vitamins &phytochemicals e.g., vitaminE, lycopene, isoflavones• Full-fat milk, red meat, potatoes, soft drinks/cordials, cakes/pastries were associated withextensive skin wrinklingSkin Wrinkling: Can Food Make a Difference? Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 20:1, 71-80, Feb 2001; Food Habits inLater Life Study
    21. 21. Studies: Carotenoids, Vitamin E & UV Light• 20 healthy subjects, aged 20-57 yearsexposed to different levels of UV light at fiveintervals• Assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Carotenoids orcarotenoids plus vitamin E given for 12weeks:– 25 mg carotenoids (Betatene®)– 500 IUs of vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol)• Elevated concentrations of carotenoids andvitamin E detected in serum and skin after 12weeks of supplementation• Combination of carotenoids plus vitamin Ehelped protect skin against UV inducederythema (redness) from 1.25 to 1.95 MEDCarotenoids and carotenoids plus vitamin E protect against ultraviolet light-induced erythema in humans, American Journal ofClinical Nutrition, 2000; 71:795-798
    22. 22. Studies: Lutein & Skin Health• 40 female healthy subjects, aged 20-50 yearsof varying skin types, with signs of prematureaging• Assigned to 1 of 4 groups: Topical luteinwith oral lutein/zeaxanthin; oral lutein/zeaxanthin; topical lutein only; placebo• Evaluated at 2-week intervals over 12 weeks• In all three lutein groups, the following wasobserved:– Skin hydration improved– Skin elasticity improved– Lipid peroxidation in skin suppressed– Superficial skin lipid levels improvedBeneficial long-term effects of combined oral/topical antioxidant treatment with carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin on humanskin, J Skin Pharmacology and Physiology 20: 199-210, 2007.
    23. 23. Studies: Phytonutrients & Skin Structure• 39 adults, average age 42 years, with normalskin• Two treatment groups:– Lycopene, lutein, beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, selenium– Lycopene, beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, selenium• Serum levels of carotenoids increased in bothtreatment groups after 12 weeks ofsupplementation• Improvement in skin structure: Skin density andthickness increased significantly in bothtreatment groups (7% and 15%, respectively)• Improvement in skin texture: Roughness andscaling were improved by the supplementationof antioxidantsAntioxidant Supplements Improve Parameters Related to Skin Structure in Humans, Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2006;19:224-231
    24. 24. Studies: Fruit/Veggie Concentrate & Skin Microcirculation• 52, healthy women, with normal to dryskin, aged 40-65 years adults• Treatment group received 4 capsules daily ofvegetable/fruit blend in capsules for 12 weeks• Improvement in microcirculation: blood flowincreased by 39% in treatment group after 12weeks compared with baseline; placebo grouphad significant decrease (-31%)• Increase in skin structure: Skin thicknessincreased by 16% after 12 weeks in treatmentgroup vs. 7% in placebo group• Improvement in hydration: Skin hydrationincreased by 9% after 12 weeks in treatmentgroup vs. no change in placebo groupAn encapsulated fruit and vegetable juice concentrate increases skin microcirculation in healthy women, Skin Pharmacologyand Physiology, 2012; 25:2-8
    25. 25. Contact InformationDavid H. Rahm, M.D.President and Medical DirectorCell Phone: 310-683-3444; Toll Free: 888-367-8605 ext 101Email: david@vitamedica.comYvette La-GardeDirector of EducationCell Phone: 310-849-1038; Toll Free: 888-367-8605 ext 102Email: yvette@vitamedica.com
    26. 26. Phytonutrients 101Part 2Presented by:Yvette La-Garde, Director of Education
    27. 27. Phytonutrients 101Part 1:• Basics of phytonutrients• Phytonutrient families• Benefits of taking phytonutrients• Studies supporting phytonutrients for skin healthPart 2:• How to select a phytonutrient supplement• Phyto-5 features & benefits
    28. 28. Phytonutrient Products
    29. 29. Phytonutrient Considerations• Product health objective• Single vs. multi ingredient formulation and amounts used• Formulated with additional vitamins & minerals• Inclusion of branded ingredients (e.g., LycoMato, FloraGLO, Betatene,Cinnulin)• Product delivery system (juice, powder, tablet, capsule)• Price
    30. 30. Our Approach
    31. 31. Phytonutrient Branded IngredientsBetatene®• Natural mixed carotenoid blend• Contains beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin• Cultivated from microscopic alga Dunaliella salina off the coast of AustraliaFloraGLO Lutein ®• Sourced from marigold flowers and purified from marigold flower oleoresinCinnulin®• Active constituent found in cinnamon, extracted using a proprietary processthat filters out the toxins found in cinnamon bark
    32. 32. • Formulated with fruits, vegetables, spices & teafrom the 5 major color groups.• Features acai, cranberry, pomegranate, papaya,kale, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, Cinnulin®,turmeric, ginger and Rooibos tea.• Ingredients are an excellent source of a widevariety of phytonutrients:– Carotenoids: beta-carotene, cryptoxanthin, lutein,zeaxanthin, lycopene– Phenolic Acids: ellagic acid– Flavonols: quercetin, myricetin– Anthocyanidins: cyanidin, malvidin– Organosulfur Compounds: isothiocyanates, indoles,glucosinolates, allylic sulfides• SRP: $26.00Phyto-5: Superfruit & Superveggie Blend
    33. 33. Phyto-5Blue-PurpleYellow-OrangeGreenRed-PinkWhite
    34. 34. • Curcuma is a compound extracted from theCurcuma longa root• Member of the ginger family• Active constituent in the spice turmeric• Extract is tasteless, odorless and is 18 timesstronger than the essential ingredients in curry• Potent anti-inflammatory compound that may bebeneficial to those suffering from arthritis• Research has shown that curcuma may help withcognitive deficits and Alzheimer’s diseasePhyto-5: Curcuma Longa
    35. 35. • Brand name for the active constituent found incinnamon, extracted using a proprietary processthat filters out the toxins found in cinnamon bark• Cinnamon extract contains anti-inflammatory,antimicrobial, antioxidant and immune-stimulatingproperties.• Widely known that cinnamon plays a role inhelping to maintain healthy blood sugar levels• Cinnulin PF® may provide additional benefitsrelated to metabolic syndrome by helping toregulate glucose levels, body composition, bloodpressure and providing antioxidant propertiesPhyto-5: Cinnulin PF®
    36. 36. • Gingerol is the active constituent that gives theginger root its distinctive flavor• Due to its powerful anti-inflammatory properties,ginger plays an integral role in treatingosteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis• Boasting anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, gingerol is also effectivein treating nausea and protecting the liver andheart• Gingerol has been shown to be especially effectivein inhibiting the growth of human colorectal andbreast cancer cellsPhyto-5: Ginger Root
    37. 37. • Rooibus tea is made from the fermented and driedleaves and twigs of the Rooibus, or red bush, aflowering shrub native to South Africa• Rooibus tea is traditionally used to alleviateinfantile colic, stomach cramps, allergies, asthmaand skin conditions and irritations• Due to its high level of polyphenolic antioxidants,rooibus tea has been shown to haveantispasmodic, anti-mutagenic and anti-cancerproperties as well as cardioprotective benefits• Rooibus tea is commonly used to treat respiratorydisorders, which may be attributed to anti-inflammatory propertiesPhyto-5: Rooibus Tea
    38. 38. Phyto-5 Phytonutrient ComplexPart of Age Management Regimen• Covers gaps in the diet when 5-9 servingsof fruits & veggies are not eaten daily• Source of wide range of phytonutrients tosupport skin health and prevent againstaging• Used on conjunction with ourMulti-Vitamin & Mineral and Omega-3supplements• Easy-to-swallow capsule• Excellent value with low daily cost (lessthan $1 a day)
    39. 39. Contact InformationDavid H. Rahm, M.D.President and Medical DirectorCell Phone: 310-683-3444; Toll Free: 888-367-8605 ext 101Email: david@vitamedica.comYvette La-GardeDirector of EducationCell Phone: 310-849-1038; Toll Free: 888-367-8605 ext 102Email: yvette@vitamedica.comwww.vitamedica.com

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