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1
Post June 2013 flood considerations
AECOM Background
3
AECOM is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range
of markets, includ...
Overview
6
With advance information, costly mistakes can
be
avoided, destruction averted, and the way
to lasting
victory made clear...
7
• Population growth
• Climate change
Why are natural disasters striking with greater
impact and more frequently in every...
8
Alberta is projected to grow from 4
to 6 million people by 2041
9
FEMA / AECOM
National Climate Change Report
Example Change: Q100
Released
by Whitehouse
June 2013
Significant Technical ...
10
IDENTIFY the risk
ASSESS the risk
COMMUNICATE the risk
MITIGATE the risk
Changing how we fundamentally deal with
risk r...
11
Risk identification and assessment
provides basis of decisions
12
Risk communication needs to be
relevant
13
Risk mitigation to change in
behavior
14
Proactive Planning
• Estimated cost $1
Reactive Emergency
Response
• Estimated cost $5-7
COST: What is the bottom line?
15
The ill-logical hydrologic cycle
Flood
Panic
Plan
Delay
Funding is the
typical reason why
action is not
taken.
Funding ...
16
“Oh don’t worry, we have a plan…”
17
What level
of
protection
(critical
facilities)
Should it
include
future
conditions
Should
freeboard
be
expanded
Should ...
Clarifying Confusing Standards for Public
19
We have confused the public with
different definitions
Bridge Standard
AN ABSOLUTE
Flood Plain Elevation
AN AVERAGE
20
All structures
operate
correctly and will
not fail
Structures will
not be
obstructed with
debris
Only existing
conditio...
21
Assumption: Structures will operate
properly and will not fail
22
Assumption: Structures will not be
blocked with debris
23
Assumption: Only existing
conditions are reflected on the maps
24
Assumption: The average flood
will occur
Regression Estimate
Upper & Lower
Prediction Limits
Water Surface
Average 1% F...
25
Statistics are used to predict the
future
26
Statistics use confidence limits to
show range of likely results
27
People generally do not associate
mud and debris with flooding
28
How effective are we today in
communicating flood?
29
Can products be improved to help guide
behavior?
Path for success
31
Planning a path forward
Top Success Factors
Source: PwC Mori Survey 1997
% of Companies Responding
Ensuring top sponso...
32
Simultaneously working on three
fronts to drive business benefit
33
Resist Reinforce Restrict Retreat
Protect with
gates, levees
and hard
structures
Protect what
we must
Upgrade
building ...
34
The Road Map to Recovery
• Define the Need / Create
the Vision
• Assess the Extent of
Damage and Scoping the
Works
• Re...
Mitigation planning
36
Property Protection
• Acquisition
• Relocation
• Building elevation
• Critical facilities
protection
• Structural Retro...
37
Natural Resource Protection
• Floodplain protection
• Watershed management
• Riparian buffers
• Forest and vegetative
m...
38
Structural / Engineered Projects
• Reservoirs
• Dams, levees, dikes
• Seawalls, revetments,
gabions
• Flood / tide gate...
39
Correcting Mistakes of the Past
40
• Risk Communication (i.e.
hazard map information)
• Outreach projects
• Speaker series/
demonstration events
• Real es...
41
Emergency Services
• Warning systems
• Emergency response
equipment
• Shelter operations
• Evacuation planning and
mana...
42
What makes a good mitigation plan?
• Process vs. Product
– “Plans are worthless. Planning is essential.”
–Dwight D. Eis...
43
Planning Process
44
• Involve the public – not as easy as it sounds!
• Develop strategy for multiple methods of engagement
– Meetings / Ope...
45
Continuous outreach and public relations yields
actions at the community
NEW
FLOOD MAPS
46
Planning Process
47
Planning Process
48
• Involve local media
– Press releases, interviews, etc.
• Establish more formal roles for those
interested in particip...
49
• Relies heavily on historical data,
GIS technology, and probabilistic
risk modeling
• Better local data = better risk
...
50
HAZUS quantifies the disaster
Short
Term
Shelter
Substantial
Damage
Essential
Facility Loss
of Use
Debris
Generated
Tru...
51
Predicting the risk of flood in
financial terms
52
HAZUS: Based on best data
53
Risk Assessment: Assessing Vulnerability
54
Risk Assessment: Assessing Vulnerability
Estimated Potential Losses to Flood Hazards
Return
Interval
Capital Stock Loss...
55
Risk Assessment: Assessing Vulnerability
56
Risk Assessment: Summary Conclusions
Table 6.21
Summary of Results
Hazard
Category/Degree of Risk
Probability Impact Sp...
57
Risk Assessment: Summary Conclusions
58
Risk Assessment: Summary Conclusions
Table 5.22
Conclusions on Hazard Risk
HIGH RISK
Nor’easter
Flood
ExtremeWind
Hurri...
59
Mitigation Strategy: Mitigation Action Plan
Action
Category
Hazard
Objective(s) Addressed
Priority
Funding Sources
Resp...
60
Mitigation Strategy: Mitigation Action Plan
• Actions should:
– be realistically achievable;
– be measureable (include
...
61
Assign and enforce responsibility/accountability
Transparent and uniform method
of comparing projects
63
• Uniform Cost Estimate
– Pre-construction costs
– Construction costs
– Ancillary costs (permits, A&E fees …)
– Annual ...
Transparency in Decisions
Triple Bottom Line Tool
65
The Triple Bottom Line (TBL)
66
Financial (LCA)
Capital Costs
Operations
and Other* Costs
Environmental
Climate
Habitat
Water Use
Water Quality
Air Qua...
67
Operations and
maintenance
Replacement and
renewal
Decommissioning
Sale of bio-fuel
energy
Avoided water
treatment
Avoi...
68
TBL Model
Summary Sheet
Doesn‟t produce a recommendation or overall score
69
TBL Model Components
Project Alternatives Comparison
Project Management
71
Program management lowers risk
Leadership Skills
Capacity
Latest
Enabling
Technology
Schedule
Quality
Cost
72
PM plan key processes developed
real program experience
 Financial Management
 Schedule Management
 Requirements Man...
73
• Risks – Adequate reporting and Timely information to client
PMI Life Cycle Processes
Monitoring & Controlling Tracks
...
74
Plan
Do
Check
Act
The QMP Defines the Levels of QA/QC
 Checklists
 Peer Reviews
 Independent Reviews
 Senior Techni...
75
Plan
Do
Check
Act
The QMP Provides a Means for Learning and
Improving
 Lessons Learned
 Process Improvement
 Project...
Flood simulation can teach actions
77
• Serious computer game and simulator
– Developed by PlayGen, Ltd. under direction from ASFPM Foundation
– PlayGen, Ltd...
78
Initial Town Layout
79
Build Menu
80
Storm Animation
81
News Flash
82
End of Year Summary
Preparing for the next flood disaster
84
Winnipeg Digital Flood Manual
• Allows effective management for flooding
• Easy transition plan as staff retire
85
Simulated flood scenarios
• View the Flood Procedure Database component
• Select desired flood scenario
• Specify query...
86
All flood defense activities tracked
• Print task lists for field
crews
• Enter activity activation
/ deactivation data
87
All documentation digital
Flood Warning
89
Simple
Complicated Complex
Forecasting
Mapping
Difficulty of flood prediction
90
Stage 1: Planning Stage 2: Design & Implementation Stage 3: Operations
Proposed Implementation Process
Determine Needs ...
Potential next steps
92
92
• Flood recovery data
• Policy development
• Mitigation planning
• Mitigation implementation
• Knowledge sharing
Maj...
93
Many citizens look for leadership from the
government
94
Policies established today will establish future
resiliency of the Province
Risk communication to the public is essenti...
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Mitigation Symposium - Scott Edelman

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Slideshow presentation for Flood Mitigation Symposium, October 4, 2013.

Scott Edelman - Senior Vice President, AECOM Water Resources and past president of the Association of State Flood Plain Managers (ASFPM) Foundation

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Mitigation Symposium - Scott Edelman

  1. 1. 1 Post June 2013 flood considerations
  2. 2. AECOM Background
  3. 3. 3 AECOM is a global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, including transportation, facilities, environmental and energy. AECOM is a leader in all of the key markets that it serves. 125Serving 125 countries 45K45,000 dedicated professionals working globally $7+bnUS$7.3 billion of revenue during the 12 months ended March 31, 2011 No.1Top 500 Design Firm 353Ranked No.353 in Fortune 500 AECOM Disaster – The Way Forward Introducing AECOM Page 3
  4. 4. Overview
  5. 5. 6 With advance information, costly mistakes can
be avoided, destruction averted, and the way
to lasting victory made clear. Sun Tzu:
  6. 6. 7 • Population growth • Climate change Why are natural disasters striking with greater impact and more frequently in every corner of the world?
  7. 7. 8 Alberta is projected to grow from 4 to 6 million people by 2041
  8. 8. 9 FEMA / AECOM National Climate Change Report Example Change: Q100 Released by Whitehouse June 2013 Significant Technical Findings: • By Year 2100 riverine floodplains will double in size, • Coastal areas will double in size Significant Financial Findings In today‟s dollars: • Average loss cost per policy will increase by approximately 90% • Individual premiums will increase 10% to 40%
  9. 9. 10 IDENTIFY the risk ASSESS the risk COMMUNICATE the risk MITIGATE the risk Changing how we fundamentally deal with risk related to disasters
  10. 10. 11 Risk identification and assessment provides basis of decisions
  11. 11. 12 Risk communication needs to be relevant
  12. 12. 13 Risk mitigation to change in behavior
  13. 13. 14 Proactive Planning • Estimated cost $1 Reactive Emergency Response • Estimated cost $5-7 COST: What is the bottom line?
  14. 14. 15 The ill-logical hydrologic cycle Flood Panic Plan Delay Funding is the typical reason why action is not taken. Funding needs to take advantage of political good will
  15. 15. 16 “Oh don’t worry, we have a plan…”
  16. 16. 17 What level of protection (critical facilities) Should it include future conditions Should freeboard be expanded Should set- backs / floodway be established How should re-building take place? 17
  17. 17. Clarifying Confusing Standards for Public
  18. 18. 19 We have confused the public with different definitions Bridge Standard AN ABSOLUTE Flood Plain Elevation AN AVERAGE
  19. 19. 20 All structures operate correctly and will not fail Structures will not be obstructed with debris Only existing conditions are considered Degree of uncertainty of the science We need to inform the public on the underlying assumptions
  20. 20. 21 Assumption: Structures will operate properly and will not fail
  21. 21. 22 Assumption: Structures will not be blocked with debris
  22. 22. 23 Assumption: Only existing conditions are reflected on the maps
  23. 23. 24 Assumption: The average flood will occur Regression Estimate Upper & Lower Prediction Limits Water Surface Average 1% Flood
  24. 24. 25 Statistics are used to predict the future
  25. 25. 26 Statistics use confidence limits to show range of likely results
  26. 26. 27 People generally do not associate mud and debris with flooding
  27. 27. 28 How effective are we today in communicating flood?
  28. 28. 29 Can products be improved to help guide behavior?
  29. 29. Path for success
  30. 30. 31 Planning a path forward Top Success Factors Source: PwC Mori Survey 1997 % of Companies Responding Ensuring top sponsorship 82% Treating people fairly 82% Involving employees 75% Giving quality communications 70% Providing sufficient training 68% Using clear performance measures 65% Building teams after change 62% Focusing on culture/skill changes 62% Rewarding success 60% Using internal champions 60% Reasons for Failure Source: 1995 Harvard Business Review One Way Communications Under communicating the vision by a factor of 10 Lack of Commitment Among Workforce Not removing obstacles to achieve the new vision Poor Change Management Not planning for change response from stake holders and not communicating benefits to them Small Scale Success Declaring Victory too soon and stopping Culture Resistance or Rejections Not anchoring change in the organization culture
  31. 31. 32 Simultaneously working on three fronts to drive business benefit
  32. 32. 33 Resist Reinforce Restrict Retreat Protect with gates, levees and hard structures Protect what we must Upgrade building codes/ ordinances Where it’s too difficult or impossible to protect Investigate + Study Likely Scenarios
  33. 33. 34 The Road Map to Recovery • Define the Need / Create the Vision • Assess the Extent of Damage and Scoping the Works • Reviewi the Options and assertain the priorities • Accelerate the „Early Wins‟ • Develop the Infrastructure Response Plan • Agree the Strategy for Recovery • Create the Infrastructure Master Plan • Develop the Master Schedule and Budget • Set up the Management Controls and Reporting Structure • Establish the Key Performance Indicators / Deliverables • Mobilise the Program Team • Develop the Master Infrastructure Recovery Plan • Produce the Execution Strategy and Implementation Plan • Procure the Design Consultants • Accelerate the Enabling Works Packages • Monitor and Control the Program • Launch the „Investor Confidence Initiative‟ • Communicate the „Good News‟ stories globally • Produce the Procurement Strategy for Implementation • Appoint the Program Management Consultant for Delivery • Launch the Recovery Program Stage 1 – (30-120 Days) Stage 2 – (60 -180 Days) Stage 3 – (60+ Days) STRATEGIC PLANNING PHASE RESPOND RECOVER– Short Term RECOVER – Long Term Page 34
  34. 34. Mitigation planning
  35. 35. 36 Property Protection • Acquisition • Relocation • Building elevation • Critical facilities protection • Structural Retrofitting • Safe rooms, shutters, shatter-resistant glass • Insurance
  36. 36. 37 Natural Resource Protection • Floodplain protection • Watershed management • Riparian buffers • Forest and vegetative management • Erosion and sediment control • Wetland preservation and restoration • Habitat preservation • Coastal management
  37. 37. 38 Structural / Engineered Projects • Reservoirs • Dams, levees, dikes • Seawalls, revetments, gabions • Flood / tide gates, hurricane barriers • Stormwater diversions, detention/retention basins, channel modification • Reservoirs • Beach nourishment, dune restoration • Slope stabilization
  38. 38. 39 Correcting Mistakes of the Past
  39. 39. 40 • Risk Communication (i.e. hazard map information) • Outreach projects • Speaker series/ demonstration events • Real estate disclosure • Library materials • School children educational programs • Hazard expositions • Technical assistance Public Education & Awareness
  40. 40. 41 Emergency Services • Warning systems • Emergency response equipment • Shelter operations • Evacuation planning and management • Emergency response training and exercises • Sandbagging for flood protection • Installing temporary shutters
  41. 41. 42 What makes a good mitigation plan? • Process vs. Product – “Plans are worthless. Planning is essential.” –Dwight D. Eisenhower • Holistic mitigation strategy – Includes projects + policies + programs + recurring activities • Specific, practical and measurable actions – Linked to sound assessments of risk and capability • Straightforward implementation mechanisms – Routine monitoring, evaluating and updating – Integration with other community processes/initiatives – Effectively applied following disaster events
  42. 42. 43 Planning Process
  43. 43. 44 • Involve the public – not as easy as it sounds! • Develop strategy for multiple methods of engagement – Meetings / Open Houses – Public Opinion Surveys – hard copy and web-deployed – Combine efforts with other public outreach initiatives – Be creative in getting the word out Planning Process
  44. 44. 45 Continuous outreach and public relations yields actions at the community NEW FLOOD MAPS
  45. 45. 46 Planning Process
  46. 46. 47 Planning Process
  47. 47. 48 • Involve local media – Press releases, interviews, etc. • Establish more formal roles for those interested in participating in the process – Citizen Advisory Committee – Stakeholder Interest Groups Planning Process
  48. 48. 49 • Relies heavily on historical data, GIS technology, and probabilistic risk modeling • Better local data = better risk assessments • Better risk assessments do not necessarily lead to higher quality mitigation plans – Have often been the most overemphasized phase of the planning process Risk Assessment
  49. 49. 50 HAZUS quantifies the disaster Short Term Shelter Substantial Damage Essential Facility Loss of Use Debris Generated Truckloads Required to Remove Economic Loss Ottawa 2,695 104 0 46,514 1,861 180.0M Rogers 5,194 310 0 64,385 2,575 256.2M Muskogee 2,023 69 4 26,456 1,058 111.8M Pittsburg 825 113 0 30,235 1,209 117.6M Carter 949 23 0 14.939 597 71.5M Logan 857 79 2 21,461 858 102.2M
  50. 50. 51 Predicting the risk of flood in financial terms
  51. 51. 52 HAZUS: Based on best data
  52. 52. 53 Risk Assessment: Assessing Vulnerability
  53. 53. 54 Risk Assessment: Assessing Vulnerability Estimated Potential Losses to Flood Hazards Return Interval Capital Stock Losses Business Interruption Losses Total LossTotal Building Damage Total Contents Damage Inventory Loss Relocation Loss Capital Related Loss Wage Losses Rental Income Loss 10-Year $35,002,000 $44,332,000 $1,969,000 $226,000 $228,000 $1,148,000 $65,000 $82,970,000 50-Year $47,887,000 $60,430,000 $2,430,000 $316,000 $321,000 $1,255,000 $100,000 $112,739,000 100-Year $56,112,000 $73,797,000 $3,309,000 $390,000 $542,000 $1,501,000 $147,000 $135,798,000 500-Year $66,630,000 $88,974,000 $3,956,000 $445,000 $606,000 $1,861,000 $174,000 $162,646,000 Additional Impacts Caused by Flood Hazards Return Interval Debris Generated (tons) Displaced Households Temporary Shelter Needs 10-Year 10,821 2,407 5,124 50-Year 14,446 3,066 6,860 100-Year 15,368 3,164 7,194 500-Year 17,539 3,534 8,200
  54. 54. 55 Risk Assessment: Assessing Vulnerability
  55. 55. 56 Risk Assessment: Summary Conclusions Table 6.21 Summary of Results Hazard Category/Degree of Risk Probability Impact Spatial Extent Warning Time Duration PRI Score Atmospheric Hazards Extreme Temperatures Highly Likely Minor Small More than 24 hours Less than one week 2.3 Extreme Wind Highly Likely Critical Large More than 24 hours Less than 24 hours 3.2 Hurricane & Tropical Storm Likely Catastrophic Large More than 24 hours Less than 24 hours 3.2 Lightning Highly Likely Minor Negligible Less than 6 hours Less than 6 hours 2.2 Nor’easter Highly Likely Catastrophic Large More than 24 hours Less than one week 3.6 Tornado Likely Limited Small Less than 6 hours Less than 6 hours 2.4 Winter Storm Highly Likely Limited Large More than 24 hours Less than one week 3.0 Hydrologic Hazards Coastal Erosion Highly Likely Limited Moderate More than 24 hours More than one week 2.9 Dam Failure Unlikely Critical Small Less than 6 hours Less than 6 hours 2.1 Drought Possible Limited Moderate More than 24 hours More than one week 2.3 Flood Highly Likely Critical Moderate 6 to 12 hours More than one week 3.4 Storm Surge Possible Critical Moderate More than 24 hours Less than 24 hours 2.4 Wave Action Highly Likely Limited Moderate More than 24 hours More than one week 2.9 Geologic Hazards Earthquake Unlikely Minor Small Less than 6 hours Less than 6 hours 1.5 Landslide Likely Critical Small Less than 6 hours Less than 6 hours 2.7 Other Natural Hazards Wildfire Highly Likely Minor Moderate Less than 6 hours Less than one week 2.8
  56. 56. 57 Risk Assessment: Summary Conclusions
  57. 57. 58 Risk Assessment: Summary Conclusions Table 5.22 Conclusions on Hazard Risk HIGH RISK Nor’easter Flood ExtremeWind Hurricaneand TropicalStorm WinterStorm MODERATE RISK CoastalErosion WaveAction Wildfire Landslide StormSurge Tornado LOW RISK Drought ExtremeTemperatures Lightning DamFailure Earthquake
  58. 58. 59 Mitigation Strategy: Mitigation Action Plan Action Category Hazard Objective(s) Addressed Priority Funding Sources Responsibility Completion Date Background
  59. 59. 60 Mitigation Strategy: Mitigation Action Plan • Actions should: – be realistically achievable; – be measureable (include performance-based outcomes); – be tied to specific assignments of responsibility; – include a mix of mitigation techniques: • Prevention • Property Protection • Natural Resource Protection • Structural Projects • Public Education & Awareness
  60. 60. 61 Assign and enforce responsibility/accountability
  61. 61. Transparent and uniform method of comparing projects
  62. 62. 63 • Uniform Cost Estimate – Pre-construction costs – Construction costs – Ancillary costs (permits, A&E fees …) – Annual maintenance costs – Time value of money • Benefits – Avoided damages and losses – Avoided causalities – Avoided emergency management costs Transparent uniform method to rank projects
  63. 63. Transparency in Decisions Triple Bottom Line Tool
  64. 64. 65 The Triple Bottom Line (TBL)
  65. 65. 66 Financial (LCA) Capital Costs Operations and Other* Costs Environmental Climate Habitat Water Use Water Quality Air Quality Natural Resource Inputs Social System Resilience Ratepayer Affordability Bicycle and Pedestrian Environment Odor Noise Recreation / Open Space Employment Cultural Resources Construction Impacts TBL Evaluation Criteria * Includes Operations & Maintenance, Replacement & Renewal, Decommissioning, and Avoided Costs
  66. 66. 67 Operations and maintenance Replacement and renewal Decommissioning Sale of bio-fuel energy Avoided water treatment Avoided combined sewer discharge Design and planning Capital equipment Installation and construction Operating cost Avoided cost Capital cost LCA Components
  67. 67. 68 TBL Model Summary Sheet Doesn‟t produce a recommendation or overall score
  68. 68. 69 TBL Model Components Project Alternatives Comparison
  69. 69. Project Management
  70. 70. 71 Program management lowers risk Leadership Skills Capacity Latest Enabling Technology Schedule Quality Cost
  71. 71. 72 PM plan key processes developed real program experience  Financial Management  Schedule Management  Requirements Management  Deliverable Management  Data Management  Communications Management  Change Management  Risk Management  Action Item Management  Subcontract Management  Quality Management
  72. 72. 73 • Risks – Adequate reporting and Timely information to client PMI Life Cycle Processes Monitoring & Controlling Tracks 73 Key performance metrics Balanced scorecard Shared metrics Earned value management EVM portal
  73. 73. 74 Plan Do Check Act The QMP Defines the Levels of QA/QC  Checklists  Peer Reviews  Independent Reviews  Senior Technical Reviews  QASP
  74. 74. 75 Plan Do Check Act The QMP Provides a Means for Learning and Improving  Lessons Learned  Process Improvement  Project Closeout Lessons Learned Library identifies opportunities for Process Improvement
  75. 75. Flood simulation can teach actions
  76. 76. 77 • Serious computer game and simulator – Developed by PlayGen, Ltd. under direction from ASFPM Foundation – PlayGen, Ltd developed “FloodSim” game for public awareness in the UK • Purpose: – Simulation & learning environment for decision-makers – Teach disaster-resilient & NAI principles for community development – Show community health and smart floodplain management link • Sponsorship opportunities available “FloodManager” Interactive Professional Game
  77. 77. 78 Initial Town Layout
  78. 78. 79 Build Menu
  79. 79. 80 Storm Animation
  80. 80. 81 News Flash
  81. 81. 82 End of Year Summary
  82. 82. Preparing for the next flood disaster
  83. 83. 84 Winnipeg Digital Flood Manual • Allows effective management for flooding • Easy transition plan as staff retire
  84. 84. 85 Simulated flood scenarios • View the Flood Procedure Database component • Select desired flood scenario • Specify query criteria • Display query results with resource quantities in tabular or map display
  85. 85. 86 All flood defense activities tracked • Print task lists for field crews • Enter activity activation / deactivation data
  86. 86. 87 All documentation digital
  87. 87. Flood Warning
  88. 88. 89 Simple Complicated Complex Forecasting Mapping Difficulty of flood prediction
  89. 89. 90 Stage 1: Planning Stage 2: Design & Implementation Stage 3: Operations Proposed Implementation Process Determine Needs & Capabilities Develop Systems & Procedures Effective & Sustainable Operations Flood Warning System Page 90 • Identify Areas to Receive Flood Warning Protection • Identify Flood Hazards in the Defined Areas • Research Historical Floods (known hazards) • Prepare Engineering Models to Simulate Flood Scenarios (potentially unknown hazards) • Identify Populations and Infrastructure at Risk in the Flood Hazard Areas • Assess Response Capabilities • Identify Organizations which Participate in Flood Response in the Defined Areas • Estimate Response Capabilities and Timelines • Identify Responsible Agency • Develop a Funding Plan • Meteorological Forecasting • Local Agency and/or 3rd Party • Precipitation Monitoring • Satellite, Radar and Gauges • Discharge Monitoring • Gauges on Dams and Streams • Data Collection • Need Reliable Communications • Flood Forecasting • Engineering Models with Flood Mapping (static or dynamic) • Develop Response Plans • Flood Emergency Action Plan • Internal Communications Plan • Operations & Maintenance Plan • Public Education Plan • Public Communications Plan • System Implementation Ongoing Activities: • Operator Training • Public Education • Daily Operations • Staff Operations Schedule • Maintenance Schedule • Monitor Meteorological Forecasts (long & short range) • Monitor Flood Forecast Models • Follow EAP Guidance for Flood Operation Triggers • Flood Operations • Mobilize, Monitor & Forecast • EAP Response Guidance for Warnings & Evacuations • Update Forecasts • After-action Debriefs • Revise Plans as Appropriate
  90. 90. Potential next steps
  91. 91. 92 92 • Flood recovery data • Policy development • Mitigation planning • Mitigation implementation • Knowledge sharing Major steps forward
  92. 92. 93 Many citizens look for leadership from the government
  93. 93. 94 Policies established today will establish future resiliency of the Province Risk communication to the public is essential for proper individual actions Transparency on projects is crucial for public support Monitor, Measure, Report, Repeat Summary

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