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Introduction to Bluetooth

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Introduction to Bluetooth

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Introduction to Bluetooth

  1. 1. Introduction to Bluetooth Yong Heui Cho @ Mokwon University Most of slides are referred to and all credits should go to: [1] Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare, 2011. [2] Erin Yueh, Android Bluetooth Introduction, slideshare, 2009.
  2. 2. 2 Smart Device Structure 8. Introduction to IoT 9. Smart Device RF & Antennas 10. Introduction to RTOS 11. Introduction to Bluetooth
  3. 3. 3 Why Bluetooth? • Aims at so-called ad hoc piconets which are local area networks with a very limited coverage and without the need for an infrastructure. • Designed to be used to connect both mobile devices and peripherals that currently require a wire □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  4. 4. 4 Spec. (I) • “USB without wires” • Short range wireless radio technology – Operation range of 10 meters – RF is centered at 2.45 GHz. (RF Channels: 2420+k MHz, k = 0~78) – Frequency hopping is used to combat interference in wireless environment. – TDD for full duplex communications □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  5. 5. 5 Spec. (II) • Power levels – Sleeping power - 30 uA – Transmission power - 800 uA – Standby mode - 300 uA • Price is less. • Operates on circuit and packet switching modes • Provides both asynchronous and synchronous data services. □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  6. 6. 6 Spec. (III) • Compared to wired and wireless LAN(10 Mbps), Bluetooth is slower. • Bluetooth can – Recognize Bluetooth device in radio range. – Permit easy connection of devices. – Be aware of device types. – Support service discovery. □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  7. 7. 7 Possible Devices • Bluetooth will soon be enabled in everything from: – Smartphones – Headsets – Computers – Cameras – Smart devices – Cars – etc. □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  8. 8. 8 Radio Coverage • Class 3 radios – have a range of up to 1 meter or 3 feet • Class 2 radios – most commonly found in mobile devices – have a range of 10 meters or 30 feet • Class 1 radios – used primarily in industrial use cases – have a range of 100 meters or 300 feet □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  9. 9. 9 Overview • Capacity – 1 Mbps per channel – Theoretical capacity of 79 Mbps cannot be reached due to non-orthogonal hopping sequences • Link types – Synchronous connection-oriented link (SCO) – Asynchronous connectionless link (ACL) • Topology and medium access control – Master-slave architecture □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  10. 10. 10 Link Types • SCO (Synchronous Connection-Oriented) – The SCO link is point-to-point between master and slave. The master maintains the link by using reserved timeslots at regular intervals. Packet retransmissions are not allowed. • ACL (Asynchronous Connection-Less) – ACL provides packet-switched connections between the master and all active slaves. Packet retransmissions are usually applied to assure data integrity. □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  11. 11. 11 Power States □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare. low power mode
  12. 12. 12 Power Management • Stand-by (SB) or idle – Devices not connected in a piconet – Extremely low duty cycle (less than one percent): scan for 10 ms every 1.28-3.84 seconds • Park (P) – Devices are part of a piconet, but not active, low power mode – Assigned an 8-bit parked member address (PMA) and loses active member address (AMA). • Hold (H) – Similar to parked mode, but devices keep AMA address – Resume sending at once after transition out of HOLD state • Sniff (Sn) – Used only by slave devices for power conservation – Device is active, but listens to channel at a reduced rate. Not on every slot □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  13. 13. 13 Piconet □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  14. 14. 14 Scatternet □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare.
  15. 15. 15 Protocol Stack □ Courtesy to Victer Paul, Bluetooth, slideshare. • OBEX: Object Exchange • RFCOMM: RF Communication • SDP: Service Discovery Protocol • TCS: Telephony Control Protocol • WAP: Wireless Application Protocol
  16. 16. 16 Android Bluetooth □ Courtesy to Erin Yueh, Android Bluetooth Introduction, slideshare.
  17. 17. 17 Bluetooth Architecture □ Courtesy to Erin Yueh, Android Bluetooth Introduction, slideshare.

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