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SINO-U.S. TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION—“BUYING” AN AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM: A PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION STUDY<br />Jerr...
Intro to the Study<br />Higher Education<br />Increasingly commercialized<br />No longer a ”public good”<br />Sold and bou...
Transnational Education (TNE)‏<br />Increasing worldwide demand for education<br />Expected to exceed 2000 demand by a fac...
TNE Emerges in China<br />China joins WTO in 2002<br />Becomes full trading partner in 2007<br />WTO classifies education ...
Environment for TNE in China<br />Corruption is rampant<br />Educational corruption is widespread<br />Knowledge for econo...
Primary Purpose of the Study<br />Identify & Explain Sociocultural Dimensions and their impact on:<br />Quality<br />Cost<...
Secondary Purpose of Study<br />Develop a model of TNE<br />As it is practiced in China<br />Guanxi, quality connections m...
Preliminary Model<br />How do these interact?<br />How do these fit together?<br />Where does Guanxi fit?<br />Where are q...
Six Research Questions<br />What are the organizational dynamics of the TNE Program?<br />How do social, political, econom...
Six Research Questions<br />Does the program reflect standards outlined by professional associations that monitor TNE prog...
Methodology<br />Case study as a strategy<br />Participant observation as a method<br />Taught 11 career management course...
Sino-U.S. Transnational Education “Buying” Tertiary Education<br />U.S. College<br />Profit and administrative services<br...
Quotes from Student Interviews<br />Ms Zhang:<br />”Our professor was 20, 23, and 30 minutes late for class the first week...
Quotes from Instructor Interviews<br />Colleague to the Northeast team, doing an accreditation review:<br />”If my student...
Four Findings: I<br />Chinese government policies appear to foster “academic capitalism” and to encourage “buying” higher ...
Four Findings: II<br />The TNE program lacks transparency and accountability measures that characterize the vast majority ...
Four Findings: III<br />The primary goal for this TNE program is profit ($10 million gross in 2008),—at best, student lear...
Four Findings: IV<br />The Director of NCPI relied on the Chinese cultural concepts of guanxi...<br /><ul><li>Complex netw...
Favors or service for others are reciprocated</li></ul>...and “face”...<br /><ul><li>sense of worth
perceived status</li></ul>...to market the program to students and their parents to establish the program.<br />
Nine Recomendations (1-5)‏<br />Undertake Further Research<br />Improve Information to Consumers<br />Utilize existing Qua...
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Sino-U.S. Transnational Education (TNE)

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Dissertation defense.
The model was really nifty with the original animations. A Flash is available for the TNE Model slide here http://tne.nixhome.com/TNE_Model/TNE_Model.htm

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Sino-U.S. Transnational Education (TNE)

  1. 1. SINO-U.S. TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION—“BUYING” AN AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM: A PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION STUDY<br />Jerry Vincent Nix<br />October 16th, 2009<br />Washington State University, Pullman<br />
  2. 2. Intro to the Study<br />Higher Education<br />Increasingly commercialized<br />No longer a ”public good”<br />Sold and bought, like any other commodity<br />Increasing demand<br />Seen as a ”ticket” to the world economy<br />Increase in the number of frauds, forgeries, cheats<br />Accreditation mills<br />Degree mills<br />
  3. 3. Transnational Education (TNE)‏<br />Increasing worldwide demand for education<br />Expected to exceed 2000 demand by a factor of four<br />TNE occurs when learners are located in a different country than the awarding institution<br />Developing countries want more access for their young (and increasing) populations<br />
  4. 4. TNE Emerges in China<br />China joins WTO in 2002<br />Becomes full trading partner in 2007<br />WTO classifies education as a ”tradable service”<br />Lists under GATS in 2005<br />
  5. 5. Environment for TNE in China<br />Corruption is rampant<br />Educational corruption is widespread<br />Knowledge for economic benefit<br />Quality connections (Guanxi) is an integral part of the equation<br />Guanxi is inherently corrupt<br />These conditions encourage alternative providers of education<br />Legitimate<br />Illegitimate<br />
  6. 6. Primary Purpose of the Study<br />Identify & Explain Sociocultural Dimensions and their impact on:<br />Quality<br />Cost<br />Performance<br />Satisfaction of stakeholders<br />Governments<br />Academic Institutions<br />Academics<br />Students<br />
  7. 7. Secondary Purpose of Study<br />Develop a model of TNE<br />As it is practiced in China<br />Guanxi, quality connections milieu<br />As it originates from the U.S.<br />Expectations, in terms of <br />Quality<br />Accountability<br />Meeting needs of clients (students)‏<br />
  8. 8. Preliminary Model<br />How do these interact?<br />How do these fit together?<br />Where does Guanxi fit?<br />Where are quality and accountability?<br />Satisfaction?<br />
  9. 9. Six Research Questions<br />What are the organizational dynamics of the TNE Program?<br />How do social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions influence program operation?<br />How do Chinese government policies influence program operation and quality?<br />
  10. 10. Six Research Questions<br />Does the program reflect standards outlined by professional associations that monitor TNE program quality?<br />What satisfactions and dissatisfactions do TNE students report?<br />What satisfactions and dissatisfactions do TNE instructors report?<br />
  11. 11. Methodology<br />Case study as a strategy<br />Participant observation as a method<br />Taught 11 career management courses<br />Six human resources courses<br />Four strategic planning courses<br />Interviewed Nine students (four male, five female) on two different campuses<br />Surveyed 268 students<br />Interviewed 14 Instructors<br />
  12. 12. Sino-U.S. Transnational Education “Buying” Tertiary Education<br />U.S. College<br />Profit and administrative services<br />Agent<br />Prestige, Curriculum, Ideas<br />Curriculum, Foreign Instructors<br />Ministry of Education<br />Approval<br />Profit<br />Curriculum, Chinese Instructors<br />International Business School<br />State University<br />Transnational Education Program<br />Authority<br />License<br />Profit and administrative services<br />Degrees<br />Parents / Students<br />Money<br />Students<br />Guanxi<br />(Potential) <br />
  13. 13. Quotes from Student Interviews<br />Ms Zhang:<br />”Our professor was 20, 23, and 30 minutes late for class the first week; we don’t need much, but we need professors to be in our classes.”<br />Student team presentation:<br />”We are not the best Chinese students...”<br />Ms Fei:<br />”We have experienced such an irresponsible professor.”<br />Mr. Li:<br />”...but, you know...some people think this program is a lie.”<br />
  14. 14. Quotes from Instructor Interviews<br />Colleague to the Northeast team, doing an accreditation review:<br />”If my students cannot speak English, they fail. Simple.”<br />Interviewed colleague:<br />”I call it ’meatball teaching... I give’em [students] the same ingredients every time...at least I’m consistent.”<br />Interviewed colleague:<br />”They [NCPI administrators] have tried to get me to teach over the contracted hours, pretty much everywhere I’ve been.”<br />Interviewed colleague:<br />”...really, so very sad, that such untrained individuals are put in charge of such an enormous responsibility.”<br />
  15. 15. Four Findings: I<br />Chinese government policies appear to foster “academic capitalism” and to encourage “buying” higher education programs from developed countries; in turn institutions such as Northeast College appear willing to “sell” their educational program <br />
  16. 16. Four Findings: II<br />The TNE program lacks transparency and accountability measures that characterize the vast majority of U.S. colleges and universities<br />
  17. 17. Four Findings: III<br />The primary goal for this TNE program is profit ($10 million gross in 2008),—at best, student learning is a secondary goal<br />
  18. 18. Four Findings: IV<br />The Director of NCPI relied on the Chinese cultural concepts of guanxi...<br /><ul><li>Complex network of interpersonal connections
  19. 19. Favors or service for others are reciprocated</li></ul>...and “face”...<br /><ul><li>sense of worth
  20. 20. perceived status</li></ul>...to market the program to students and their parents to establish the program.<br />
  21. 21. Nine Recomendations (1-5)‏<br />Undertake Further Research<br />Improve Information to Consumers<br />Utilize existing Quality Assurance Organizations<br />Require Human Resources Training and Certification for TNE Agents<br />Annual Evaluation of Instructors<br />
  22. 22. Nine Recommendations (6-9)‏<br />Provide Benefits and Services to TNE Instructors<br />Culture and Language Training<br />Reduction of English Requirements for TNE courses<br />Maintain a List of Approved Exporting Institutions<br />
  23. 23. Final Thoughts<br />Summary<br />Comments?<br />Questions?<br />

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