Geography: Coastal Systems

1,099 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,099
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Geography: Coastal Systems

  1. 1. Coastal Systems Input: Agents of coastal changes Effects of wave erosion on the coast Effects of wave transportation and deposition on the coast Coastal management Coastal management The coast is the area where the land meets the sea. It includes the beach and the cliff behind the beach. there are two categories of coasts. a. Primary coasts, which are created by non­marine processes. The processes include erosion, deposition, and tectonic activity. River deltas are an important example. b. Secondary coasts, which are formed by marine action. The processes include deposition of sand by waves and currents, and growth of reefs by corals. Barrier islands are an important example. The coastline marks the seaward limit of the land which is permanently exposed. It is the highest point reached by storm waves. The shore is the area of land which lies between the highest tide level and the lowest tide level. It is covered by the sea at high tide but exposed at low tide. The shore is divided into three parts: backshore, foreshore and inshore. The shoreline is the line demarcating the sea and the shore. The position of the shoreline fluctuates with the tide. Waves and Wave Action Waves are undulations of water when wind blows over the surface of the sea. They form as a result of the transfer of energy. As the wind blows over the surface of the sea, friction is created ­ producing a swell in the water. The energy of the wind causes water particles to move in a circular wave orbit inside the swell. This moves the wave forward. In the open sea, the motion of the waves is transmitted by the circular movement of the individual water molecule as the lack of frictional drag with the ocean floor in the deep water allows each water particle to move in a circular wave orbit. As the waves approach the land, and the depth of the water decreases to half the wavelength, the size of the circular wave orbit decreases and the orbital motion of the water, retarded by friction with the sea floor, forms an elliptical motion. The speed of the wave transmission decreases, the wavelength decreases and the wave height increases. Eventually the wave height reaches a point of instability and the wave breaks. The wave either a. collapses, at some distance off the shore, to produce a spilling breaker, if the water offshore is relatively shallow, or
  2. 2. b. topples forward and is forced to break against the land forming a plunging breaker, if the water remains relatively deep right up to the shore. In both cases, the water steepens, loses form and become a breaker. The water rushes up the slope of the shore as the swash. Then the water runs back down the slope of the shore as the backwash. Energy of Waves The size and energy of a wave is influenced by: ● the length of time that the wind has been blowing (duration) ● the strength of the wind (velocity) ● distance of open water over which the wind blows (fetch) 1. The energy of destructive power of the waves increases with increasing duration, increasing wind velocity and increasing distance of fetch. 2. The longer the wind blows, the stronger the wind and greater the fetch, the more powerful the waves. Coasts facing open sea are more susceptible to wave erosion while coasts in sheltered locations with weak wind and short fetch, are more prone to wave deposition. Type of waves Constructive Waves Destructive Waves Frequency Long, low waves Long wavelengths, up to 100m. Low frequency, a wave period of 6 ­ 9 waves per minute Associated with calm conditions Short, high wave Short wavelength, up to 20m. High wave frequency, a wave period of 11 ­ 15 minute Associated with stormy conditions. Breaker Waves slide forward in shallow water due to gentle offshore slope Also known as spill waves Waves curve downward in deep water due to steep offshore slope Also known as plunge waves Swash and Backwash Swash is more powerful than backwash, so materials are carried up the beach Backwash is more powerful than swahs, so materials are carried down the beach Process Deposition Erosion
  3. 3. Factors Governing the Work of Waves and the Character of Coastal Landforms ● Types of wave action → waves that break against the land are associated with wave erosion. → waves which break before reaching the shore are associated with wave deposition → constructive and destructive waves ● Geology of Coastal Rocks → type of rocks → resistance of rocks to weathering and erosion → direction of dipping of the rock strata → presence, absence and arrangement of lines of weakness (e.g. joints, fissures, faults) ● Relief of coastal slope → steep coastal slope is associated with wave erosion because waves, especially those driven by strong winds over long fetch, reach the coast in deep water and break against the land or cliff side → Gentle coastal slope is associated with wave deposition as waves are retarded by friction with the bottom of the slope in shallow waters. The waves tend to break before reaching the coast ● Orientation of the coast → The position of the coast in contrast to open sea or ocean determines whether the coast is exposed to on­coming winds that have blown over long fetch or not → the aspect of the coast in relation to strong prevailing winds determines whether the coast is exposed to high energy waves → exposed coasts are more susceptible to wave erosion → sheltered casts are more favourable to wave deposition ● Relative changes in Sea level → may result either a. from a rise of the mean sea level or submergence/sinking of the coastal land or b. from a fall of the mean sea level or emergence/uplift of the coastal land → Effect of glaciation in coastal areas ­ the drowning of glaciated valleys when sea level rises → Effects of Volcanic activity in Coastal Areas ­ occurrence of tsunamis, in relation to volcanic activity, increases rate of coastal erosion → Effects of coastal growth in coastal waters ­ coral growth offshore tends to dissipate energy before waves reach the coast, thus helping to protect the coastline. → human impact ­ modifies the natural coastal landscape by activities like reclamation, construction works, dredging, building typhoon shelters and groynes The Work of Waves and Resulting Coastal Landforms ● Wave refraction is the bending of wave fronts as they approach a shore so as to break almost parallel with the shore. In deep water, wave fronts are essentially parallel to one another. As they approach the shallow waters of the shore, the retarding influence of shallow water or frictional drag with the sea floor, causes the waves to slow down and the wave fronts to bend. Wave refraction occurs when: → along an irregular coast ­ the retarding influence of shallow waters off the headlands before
  4. 4. the shallow waters of the bay causes wave refraction. Wave energy is directed and concentrated more towards headlands rather than bays. Thus, erosion is more intensive at the headlands and deposition more common in bays. This combined effect tends to reduce shoreline irregularity. → along a straight line with approaching waves from oblique direction ● Wave erosion wave erosion is accelerated by the following conditions: → exposure to strong prevailing winds → great wind velocity → long fetch → large wave size → steep coastal slope/deep waters right up to the coast → rapid rate of weathering of coastal rocks → weak coastal rocks which are less resistant to wave attack → presence of lines of weakness (e.g. cracks, fissures, joints, and faults, non­resistant dykes and bedding planes) → large quantity of rock materials carried by waves The 4 main types of wave action are: 1. hydraulic action ­wearing away of coastal rocks when waves striking the cliff face compresses air in cracks on cliff face. this puts tremendous pressure on the surrounding rock. the air then expands explosively when the waves retreat resulting in a sudden release of pressure. This process shatters the rocks, opens up and enlarges the cracks 2. Attrition ­ the mutual wearing down of the materials (e.g. sand, pebbles and boulders) which are transported by waves. These particles become smoother, rounder in shape and smaller in size. 3. Corrasion (abrasion) ­ the wearing of the coastal rocks or cliff faces by materials (e.g. sand, pebbles and boulders) carried and hurled against the coast by waves 4. Corrosion or solution ­ the dissolving of soluble minerals in coastal rocks by sea water or waves. the dissolved minerals may crystallize from evaporating sea water spray, and this helps detach mineral grains from coastal rocks. the dissolved minerals may also be removed by sea water in solution. The remaining rocks become weakened and are more susceptible to wave erosion by abrasion and hydraulic action. Wave Erosional Features a. Headlands and Bays When waves armed with rock debris lash against the shores or along coast that have alternate bands of resistant (harder) rocks and less resistant (softer) rocks, the process of continued erosion of rocks of different resistance causes the hard, resistant rocks like limestone and chalk
  5. 5. to resist erosion and persist and the soft, less resistant rocks like clay, sand and gravel to be worn down easily.This eventually gives rise to an irregular coastline of headlands and bays. As the headlands become more exposed to the full force of the wind and waves, it will become more vulnerable to erosion than the sheltered bays. b. Cliffs, wave­cut platforms and offshore terraces When high energy waves reach land with steep slopes, they erode the weaker arts of the steep slopes to produce a notch. Continued erosion and undercutting enlarges the notch to form a steep rock face called a cliff. Undercutting at the base of the cliff, together with the removal of eroded materials, causes the cliff to retreat landwards, exposing a flat terrace at the foot of the cliff called a wave­cut platform. After a period of time, the cliff becomes steeper and retreats further landwards while the wave­cut platform becomes wider. When the wave­cut platform is buried by deposits, causing a belt of shallow water which decreases the wave­energy, erosion of the wave­cut platform ceases. The eroded materials which are transported away are deposited in the offshore zone to form an offshore terrace. c. Caves, arches, stacks and stumps Along an irregular coast of headlands and bays, waves converging on headlands, due to wave refraction, often attack and widen lines of weakness into hollows called caves. When two caves, on opposite sides of the headland, join to form a complete opening, the cave top remains as an arch. With further erosion, the arch collapses, leaving behind the seaward pillar of the rock. In time, it is completely removed by wave erosion. d. Caves, Blow Holes and Geos A blowhole is a near­vertical cleft or cylindrical tunnel leading from the rear top of a sea cave upward to the land surface above. Due to the presence of near vertical lines of weakness above the sea cave, waves surging in during high tides tend to force and compress the air into the lines of weakness. When the waves retreat suddenly, resulting in the opening and widening of the lines of weakness along the cave. Ultimately, part of the roof of the cave collapses, producing a blow hole. Continued wave erosion may widen the blow hole till the entire roof of the sea cave collapses to form a long, narrow, steep­sided inlet, called a geo. A geo may also develop when erosion extends a sea cave landwards, causing the cliff to be undercut by waves. The top portion of the
  6. 6. cave may collapse, resulting in a geo. Wave Transport Wave transport is the movement of load (e.g. silt, clay, mud, sand, pebbles, etc.) along the shore and the seabed. Waves operate as an agent of transport in two ways: 1. Beach drift. When waves break obliquely at the shore, the swash moves obliquely up the shore/beach but the backwash runs back at right angles to the shore/beach. Eroded materials are thus gradually carried along the shore/beach by the combined zig­zag movement of the swash and backwash called beach drift. 2. Longshore drift Eroded materials moving in a zig­zag manner on and off the shore create a net lateral movement parallel to the coast, called longshore drift. Wave Deposition Features Produced by Wave Deposition ● Bay delta ● Bay ● Cuspate bar ● Tombolo ● Bay mouth bar ● bayhead bar ● lagoon ● hook ● complex recurved spit Beach A gently sloping platform formed by the accumulation of material (e.g. mud, sand, pebbles. cobbles) deposited by constructive waves on/along the shore, between the highest and lowest water levels Beaches are classified according to position: ● Bay­head beach. → formed at head of a bay between two headlands. The waves which reach the head of a bay are relatively low­energy waves and carry finer particles to the shore. ● Bay­side beach → formed at the sides of a bay. It is usually composed of coarser sand particles, or a mixture of sand, gravel and pebbles. ● Bay­mouth beach (or headland beach) → formed at the tip of a headland. It consists of coarser particles, gravel and boulders Beaches are also classified according to type of deposits, for example, sandy beach, shingle
  7. 7. beach and boulder beach. Spit, Recurved spit and Tombolo A spit is a narrow ridge of sand or shingle deposited by longshore drift at a sharp or abrupt turn of the coastline or across the mouth of a river. the occurrence of longshore drift, running parallel to a relatively straight coast, causes beach materials to be laterally transferred even at the turn of the coastline. As slack water occurs at the turn, the waves lose energy and deposit the sand or shingle in the form of a ridge, called a spit. One end of the spit is attached to the mainland while the other end is free and projects into the sea. As a spit grows and extends into deeper water, wave action causes the free end to be curved towards the land, enclosing a water body called the lagoon. Such a spit is called a hook, or recurved spit. When the spit extends seawards and joins up an offshore island to another island or the mainland, a tombolo is formed. Other features associated with a spit: i. bay­mouth bar when two spits extend from opposite sides of the bay (as they longshore drift follows different directions at different times of the year), and eventually meet and join. ii. cuspate bar, where two spits develop on the two sides of a headland and they eventually meet and join each other iii. cuspate foreland ­ when the water body, enclosed by a cuspate bar, is gradually silted to form a piece of land. Bars They are narrow ridges of sand and/or gravel deposited by waves across a bay, usually in a direction parallel to the shore. It may be continuous or semi­continuous with breaks in between. When a bar is first formed, both ends are free (i.e. not attached to the land). Subsequent and continued deposition may cause its end(s) to extend to join the land. Like beaches, bars are classified according to position: ● Bay­head bar ­ when wave refraction on bay shores sweeps materials towards the head of a bay to form a ridge of accumulated material rising from the sea floor, above the low tide level. ● Bay­mouth bar ­ When a spit grows form the headland and joins with the headland on the opposite end, the feature formed is a bar­mouth bar. The enclosed body of water in the bar, by the bar, is called a lagoon. ● Offshore bar ­ may develop where waves break offshore, due to gentle slopes under water, and deposit the material. It is free at both and and runs parallel to the shore.
  8. 8. Mudflats Silty or muddy platforms deposited by waves and/or by rivers along gently sloping shores. They may be encroached by salt­loving and salt­tolerant vegetation (e.g. mangrove), to form a swamp or marsh.

×