Why Children and Youth Go to School, and Why they          Don’t   Being Proactive Conference,  Toronto District School Bo...
High Well-beingLow “Disorder”                     High “Disorder”                 Low Well-being
-.03                                  -.21*                      .53*                   .18*                       -.14   ...
Service UseExperience              .33*                     Resilience              .37*FunctionalOutcomes
Evolution of Resilience Theory   Intrinsic quality: The “invulnerable child” and   studies of children in contexts of war ...
Psychological Resilience is…  In the context of exposure to significant  adversity  resilience is the capacity of individu...
Five things we knowabout Resilience:   Nurture trumps nature   Differential impact of strengths under   stress   Resilienc...
Changing Social Ecologies CanCreate Resilience                              Entire Population            70%             2...
Seven Resources                          cultural                         adherence                                       ...
Better toSubstitute than  Suppress
Thank you!    Michael Ungar, Ph.D.        Killam Professor, Co-Director         Resilience Research Centre School of Socia...
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Dr. Michael Ungar - Why Children and Youth Go to School and Why they Don't

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Dr. Michael Ungar - Why Children and Youth Go to School and Why they Don't

  1. 1. Why Children and Youth Go to School, and Why they Don’t Being Proactive Conference, Toronto District School Board, March 22, 2013 Michael Ungar, Ph.D. School of Social Work, Dalhousie UniversityTwitter @MichaelUngarPhD www.michaelungar.comwww.resilienceresearch.org
  2. 2. High Well-beingLow “Disorder” High “Disorder” Low Well-being
  3. 3. -.03 -.21* .53* .18* -.14 .13 Service UseContextual Risk Individual Risk Experience Life time Service Use Accumulation -.17* -.38* .33* .07 -.30* Resilience .37* Functional Outcomes
  4. 4. Service UseExperience .33* Resilience .37*FunctionalOutcomes
  5. 5. Evolution of Resilience Theory Intrinsic quality: The “invulnerable child” and studies of children in contexts of war Protective processes Promoting self-esteem and self-efficacy, reduction of risk impact, reducing negative chain reactions, opening opportunities Ecological, temporal interpretations across cultures Biopsychosocial, neuroplasticity, epigenetics
  6. 6. Psychological Resilience is… In the context of exposure to significant adversity resilience is the capacity of individuals to navigate their way to the psychological, social, cultural, and physical resources that sustain their well being, and… their capacity individually and in groups to negotiate for these resources to be provided… in culturally meaningful ways.
  7. 7. Five things we knowabout Resilience: Nurture trumps nature Differential impact of strengths under stress Resilience is cumulative Context and culture influence what matters most Long-term, not all adaptations are advantageous
  8. 8. Changing Social Ecologies CanCreate Resilience Entire Population 70% 20% 10% Percentage of Sub- Population Exposed to Significant Risk
  9. 9. Seven Resources cultural adherence cohesion relationships access toidentity material resources power & social justice control
  10. 10. Better toSubstitute than Suppress
  11. 11. Thank you! Michael Ungar, Ph.D. Killam Professor, Co-Director Resilience Research Centre School of Social Work, Dalhousie University www.michaelungar.comwww.resilienceresearch.org

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