Play decide: Malaria (english)

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PlayDecide is a dialogue game to talk in a simple and effective way about controversial issues. It is very easy to set up a session of PlayDecide. It's a conversation game that requires a small group of people (4 to 8, although it works best with 5-6 people) around a table. Decide takes about 80 minutes to play. This game looks at investments to control malaria.

Malaria is a common parasitic disease, caused by a parasite transmitted from human to human via mosquito. Three billion people are at risk of malaria. It was responsible for nearly 800,000 deaths worldwide in 2010. The WHO estimates that around €4 billion is necessary in order to tackle malaria in 2015. But how should the spending be distributed if only €3.5 billion of the necessary €4 billion is raised? Would you cut funding for prevention, treatment and diagnosis? Or would you cut funding for research? Should some countries be given priority to get funding?

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Play decide: Malaria (english)

  1. 1. PlayDecide: MalariaThank you for downloading this Decide kit!Every kit contains all the necessary elements for a group of up to 8 people playing Decide. If you havemore participants, provide each group with a kit.The kit can be printed on A4 paper or cardboard. For best results, use 160g/m2 paper.The first 9 pages have borders of different colours, indicating the colour of the paper on which theyshould be printed. There are 3 or 4 green, 3 or 4 blue, 1 yellow and 2 orange sheets.The other pages should be printed on white paper or cardboard.The last 4 pages contain the placemat and the instructions for each participant.It is important that each participant has a placemat in A3 format.The instruction card should be printed preferably in colour, although it will work also in black and white.Make sure that there are as many placemats and instructions cards as there are participants.Enjoy Decide!For any question or information on how to play the game, please email: info@playdecide.org
  2. 2. Instructions1.Preparation.Print out the PDFs on coloured paper or light cardboard according to the files’ names.You need the following A4 sheets: yellow (1), orange (2), green (3 or 4), blue (3 or 4) and white (7).Cut out the cards.Print or copy as many placemats and instructions as there are players. Decide works best whenplayed by 4 to 8 people.2.Getting started.From start to finish, Decide will take 80 minutes to play.All players have a ‘placemat’ in front of them. There are different types of cards that will gradually fillup the placemats.The facilitator talks the players through the flow of decide using the visual instructions. He or shepoints out the aims of the game.During the first part of Decide, information is gathered and shared. Then the discussion phase follows.In the third part the players try to formulate a shared group response. Decide ends when the resultsare uploaded to www.playdecide.eu and to the Xplore Health blog.Before the first phase starts, the facilitator reminds all players about the conversation guidelines(bottom left) and hands out the yellow cards.Anyone can raise a yellow card to pause the discussion in case they feel someone is not respectingthe guidelines. When the issue is solved, the discussion resumes.On the top right there is a space for notes and ‘initial thoughts’.
  3. 3. 3.Phase 1. InformationThis part of the game will take approximately 30 minutes. All players read the introduction (top-left).All players read a few storycards, choose one, which is significant for them and put it on the placemat.Each player briefly summarizes their storycard.All players exchange and read infocards, choose two, which are significant for them and put them onthe placemat. Each player briefly summarizes their infocards.All players read issuecards, choose two, which are significant for them and put them on the placemat.Each player briefly summarizes their issuecards.Players can use the white cards at any time to add information and issues if needed. (Not all steps areshown, the same procedure is repeated for story-, info- and issuecards. At the end of this phase alltypes of cards are on the placemats as shown in the last image)4.Phase 2. DiscussionThis part of the game takes approximately another 30 minutes.There are different ways to discuss. You can choose one that fits the character of the group.There is the ‘Free form’. No restrictions, the discussion flows among the players. Everyone tries torespect the guidelines (if not the yellow cards can be used).A more structured way to discuss is to ‘talk in rounds’.If the discussion is difficult or it slows down, ‘challengecards’ might loosen things up. The facilitatorhands them out, face down. Players read them and take action.During this phase, players use the cards to sustain their arguments.They put on the table the cards that back up their contributions, group them and record the discussionby making clusters around the themes that reflect the group’s vision.All types of cards can be used to make a cluster. At the end of this phase there should be at least onecluster.
  4. 4. 5.Phase 3. A shared group responseThis last part of decide will take approximately 20 minutes. Everybody reads the 4 policy positions.Based on the conclusions of the cluster(s), all players vote individually in turn on all 4 policies.Try to look for common ground. Is there a policy position you can all live with? If not, try as a group toformulate your own ‘fifth policy’.6.Upload resultsThe facilitator transfers the results on the voting form using the ‘Share your results’ function onwww.playdecide.eu. Your results will be added to the results of all other Decide sessions played inEurope.The facilitator publishes a post on the Xplore Health blog to share the experience with otheraudiences, and links to the Play Decide website where the results are published.Decide game developed by Michael Creek, in collaboration with Barcelona Science Park, in thecontext of the Xplore Health project.With the kind collaboration of Caterina Guinovart,researcher at the Barcelona Institute for Global Health,ISGlobal.Thanks also to Paola Rodari at SISSA Medialab and Andrea Bandelli for their invaluable feedback.The PlayDecide game format was developed by the projects DECIDE and FUND: seewww.playdecide.eu
  5. 5. Info Card 1 Info Card 2 Info Card 3Genetic protection against Acquired immunity to malaria Malaria and pregnancymalaria In areas where malaria is endemic, During pregnancy, women are moreOne third of the population in people develop a natural acquired at risk of severe diseases likesub-Saharan Africa possess a form immunity to malaria. If children malaria. Malaria infection can alsoof genetic protection against malaria. survive the first years of life after cross the placenta and affect theThey are born with one copy of the repeated exposure to the malaria foetus.gene for Sickle Cell Anaemia or parasite, they become semi-immune,Thalassaemia, which confers certain which means malaria infection willprotection against severe malaria. show no symptoms or only mild symptoms.Info Card 4 Info Card 5 Info Card 6Development of a malaria Insecticides and malaria Preventing malaria invaccine prevention pregnant women (IPTp)A new vaccine, called RTS,S and To prevent malaria, one very A strategy called Intermittentproduced by GlaxoSmithKline, has successful method is to spray the Preventive Treatment for pregnantshown to be partially effective against walls of houses with insecticidal women (IPTp), which means takinginfection and clinical malaria in sprays, and to distribute nets treated an antimalarial drug 2 or 3 timesbabies and children up to 5. A clinical with insecticides, to sleep under. during pregnancy, is nowtrial is ongoing with thousands of Insecticide-treated nets require recommended in endemic areas. It ischildren in Africa. If successful, it will regular re-treatment. recommended that pregnant womenbecome the first malaria vaccine to sleep under insecticide-treated nets.be licensed. However, it will only beeffective in about 50% of children.Info Card 7 Info Card 8 Info Card 9Intermittent preventive Eliminating malaria Malaria and the economytreatment in infants (IPTi) Malaria has been successfully In Africa, malaria is thought to beThe WHO recommends IPTi for eliminated from several parts of the responsible for 12 billion US dollarsinfants in endemic areas. This is a full world, through a combination of every year in public and privatecourse of antimalarial drugs given to medical and environmental spending, resulting in a loss of 1.3%infants at the same time as routine strategies, including drainage of of gross domestic product per year.vaccinations - usually at 3, 4 and 9 habitats where mosquitos breed, usemonths of age. It is also of antimalarial drugs and use ofrecommended that infants and young insecticides.children sleep underinsecticide-treated nets.
  6. 6. Info Card 10 Info Card 11 Info Card 12Who gets malaria? Where is most affected by The scale of insecticide use malaria?Around 90% of the cases in Africa In Africa, 75 million people (aroundoccur in children under 5 and Around 91% of all malaria cases 10% of those at risk of malaria) werepregnant women. Older children and occurred in the African region during protected by having their householdnon-pregnant adults are 2010, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. walls sprayed with insecticide insemi-immune and protected from Asia, Latin America, and to a lesser 2009.severe disease. extent the Middle East and parts of Europe are also affected.Info Card 13 Info Card 14 Info Card 15Treatment for malaria RDT: A new method of How widespread is preventive diagnosis treatment in pregnancy?Malaria can be treated and cured.Nowadays artemisinin-combination The Rapid Diagnostic Test is a new 33 out of the 43 countries in Africatreatments (ACTs) are device that detects the presence of where malaria is endemic adoptedrecommended, which combine the parasite in the blood without the intermittent preventive treatment forseveral antimalarial drugs. ACTs are need of a microscope. This technique pregnant women as national policypart of the national policy for is ideal for remote areas where there by the end of 2009.treatment in 90% of countries where is no microscope, microscopist ormalaria is endemic. electricity. About 30 million RDTs were delivered by ministries of health in 2009.Info Card 16 Info Card 17 Info Card 18Aiming to eradicate malaria Coverage of What do we mean by insecticide-treated nets “endemic”?In 2008, the Roll Back Malariainitiative, after a call from the Bill and Between 2008 and 2010, around 289 An infection is said to be endemic inMelinda Gates Foundation, declared million insecticide-treated nets were a population when, if nothingthat eradication was a moral distributed around the world, covering changes, the number of peopleobligation for the international around 76% of people at risk. This infected will neither increase norcommunity and suggested that it was still below the 80% target set by decrease, but remain at a steadyshould be the final goal. The Global the Roll Back Malaria partnership. state. Malaria is endemic in 106Malaria Action Plan was launched, countries.and is ongoing.
  7. 7. Info Card 19 Info Card 20 Info Card 21Malaria and conflict Malaria and education Malaria and childrenIn many low-income countries, civil In areas where malaria is endemic, One in five of all childhood deaths inwar and international conflicts have 20% to 50% of African schoolchildren Africa are due to malaria. It isled to the breakdown of malaria suffer from malaria each year. estimated that an African child has oncontrol programmes. Incidence of Malaria is a leading cause of illness average between 1.6 and 5.4malaria has increased since these and absenteeism among students episodes of malaria fever each year.conflicts. Money is needed to rebuild and teachers and impairs attendance Every 30 seconds a child dies fromthe national programmes. and learning. malaria in Africa.Info Card 22 Info Card 23 Info Card 24Malaria and childbirth Cost to households Cost to governmentsPregnant women are at high risk not The average African household In some countries, malaria accountsonly of dying from the complications spends 10% of its yearly income on for up to 40% of public healthof severe malaria, but also of prevention and treatment of malaria. expenditures; 30% to 50% ofspontaneous abortion, premature inpatient hospital admissions; and updelivery or stillbirth. Malaria is also a to 60% of outpatient health cliniccause of severe maternal anaemia visits.and is responsible for about one thirdof preventable low birth weightbabies.Info Card 25 Info Card 26 Info Card 27Capacity building Resistance to antimalarial Where has malaria been drugs eliminated?Countries affected by malaria oftendo not have strong enough The parasite that infects people with The Maldives, Tunisia, and mosthealthcare programmes to cope. Part malaria can become resistant to recently Morocco, Syria and theof the global fund to fight malaria is antimalarial drugs over time, United Arab Emirates are some ofspent on improving these systems, depending on the drug and the the countries which have eliminatedtraining staff, communicating to the location. A parasite can be resistant malaria from within their borders. Inpublic and monitoring implementation to a drug in one country and not in the past, many countries in Europe,of malaria programmes. another, for example. Antimalarial North America and Australasia also drugs are not suitable for continuous had malaria transmission. use in endemic areas, as the parasite can soon become resistant and potentially interfere with acquired natural immunity.
  8. 8. Issue Card 1 Issue Card 2 Issue Card 3Economic effects of malaria Malaria and social justice Vaccine cost and availabilityMalaria affects mainly pregnant Malaria usually affects the poorest, To have a real impact, a vaccinewomen and children, which has most vulnerable and least powerful must be cheap (it can be expensivesignificant impacts not only on people in society. Care must but subsidised) and available to thefamilies, but on economic therefore be taken to ensure that most needed. If a vaccine isdevelopment. Resources are diverted malaria programmes really reach produced, funding must be put infrom productive economic activity to those in the most need. place to ensure countries make itnursing sick children. Malaria is an available. Otherwise, it would remainimportant cause of school a luxury for rich people.absenteeism, because children suffermalaria or because they have to taketime off school or work to look afterrelatives with malaria.Issue Card 4 Issue Card 5 Issue Card 6Are nets the solution? Getting the message across Spraying insecticides: for and againstNets treated with insecticide are It is not always easy for citizens incheap and relatively easily malaria-hit countries to find out about Spraying houses may be as effectivedistributed. In an area where nets are malaria prevention and treatment. as nets in limiting malaria. But it usesused, even people without nets may Programmes to educate them have more insecticide, which can be toxicbe less likely to become infected. But to be funded. to humans when breathed in ornets rarely eliminate the possibility of swallowed. More insecticide meansinfection altogether, as mosquitos do more cost and a greater chance thatnot only bite while people are mosquitoes develop resistance.sleeping. Over time, mosquitoes canalso acquire resistance to theinsecticides in the nets.Issue Card 7 Issue Card 8 Issue Card 9Difficulties of prevention Old and new antimalarial Treatment strategyusing drugs drugs In a population where funding isTravellers to endemic countries can In some regions, the parasite that limited, how do you decide who totake antimalarial drugs as prevention transmits malaria has become treat? Those most in need? Theagainst contracting malaria. But resistant to older types of antimalarial poorest? Those with the most acutecontinuous use of drugs to prevent drugs. Developing newer treatments conditions? Those who have theinfection is not feasible for most can be expensive. least access to hospitals?people who live in malaria endemicareas – mainly due to problems ofcost, availability and drug resistance.
  9. 9. Issue Card 10 Issue Card 11 Issue Card 12Malaria and poverty What is needed for Getting consent from elimination? participants for researchMalaria is more likely to affect poorpeople as they have poor living Elimination of malaria from an area Researchers need participants fromconditions, poor general health and requires significant investment and countries with malaria in order to testlittle access to malaria prevention coordination. If eradication efforts are new treatments, for example. It istools. Malaria also makes people not carried through systematically, difficult to ensure these participantspoorer – they have to pay for then there is a risk that the parasite are informed and really agree to thetreatment and lose money from time transmitting malaria can become tests, for reasons to do withoff work. Wiping out poverty is part of resistant to the insecticides, or to the language, cultural diversity, orthe battle against malaria. drugs used to prevent infection. relative lack of knowledge of medical practice and scientific research.Issue Card 13 Issue Card 14 Issue Card 15Why do participants sign up How much is spent on malaria Where should research befor research? compared to public health focused? issues elsewhere?People in malaria-hit countries may Not all research money is spenttake part in clinical trials to get the €4 billion was spent on malaria in directly on developing newbenefit of new drugs which they could 2009, a disease which can potentially treatments and methods ofnot otherwise afford to pay for. affect 3 billion of the poorest people prevention. Some is also spent to in the world. Governments spent €59 better understand the biology of the billion tackling obesity in 2006 in the parasite and how immunity is EU alone. acquired, for example.Issue Card 16 Issue Card 17 Issue Card 18Prevention or treatment? Individual treatment getting Eradication: mission cheaper impossible?It is more cost-effective to spendmoney on preventing malaria Treating malaria patients can only Scientists generally agree that withtransmission, rather than treating become cheaper. As funding currently available tools, malaria canexisting cases of malaria. But from an programmes increase, there is be better controlled and eliminated inethical perspective, we cannot leave greater demand and so drug some areas, but not eradicatedpeople untreated, when there is a companies have to make their prices worldwide, unless new tools aretreatment available. more competitive. developed.
  10. 10. Issue Card 19 Issue Card 20 Issue Card 21Should we rely on DDT? Patent protection The social impact of eliminationDDT is an insecticide used in some The most effective malaria treatmentsAfrican and South-East Asian are relatively expensive since they Eliminating malaria often meanscountries against mosquitoes. It is rely on patented medications – draining wetlands to preventbanned in most of the world for its treatments that have been mosquitoes breeding. But this canharmful effects on health and the “copyrighted” by drug companies, to lead to loss of jobs or homes forenvironment. As DDT accumulates in prevent generic versions of a new those who live and work in wetlands.the soil, health impacts begin to drug being copied and circulatedappear in fish, other marine animals, more cheaply. But if governmentsbirds, and even humans and other drop this patent protection, drugmammals. companies will not invest in anti-malarial drugs because the research is so expensive.Issue Card 22 Issue Card 23 Issue Card 24Resistance to combination How much should be spent on Preferred channels fortherapy malaria? educationThere is already evidence of Countries where malaria is endemic People in Tanzania with low accessparasites becoming resistant to the often have other serious public health to information on malaria werenew ACT combination therapy used and development problems such as surveyed to find out how they wouldto treat malaria in some countries of poverty, hunger and HIV. How can like to be informed. 74% said radio,South East Asia. This can be partly we determine where to spend aid 41% by their doctor, 38% by friendsbecause the individual drugs in the money? and family and 29% by TV.combination therapy were commonlydistributed, before the combinationtherapy became the recommendedtreatment.
  11. 11. Guidelines Yellow Card! Guidelines Yellow Card! Guidelines Yellow Card!Use the yellow card to help Use the yellow card to help Use the yellow card to helpthe group stick to the the group stick to the the group stick to theguidelines. Wave it if you guidelines. Wave it if you guidelines. Wave it if youfeel a guideline is being feel a guideline is being feel a guideline is beingbroken or if you do not broken or if you do not broken or if you do notunderstand what is going on. understand what is going on. understand what is going on.Guidelines Yellow Card! Guidelines Yellow Card! Guidelines Yellow Card!Use the yellow card to help Use the yellow card to help Use the yellow card to helpthe group stick to the the group stick to the the group stick to theguidelines. Wave it if you guidelines. Wave it if you guidelines. Wave it if youfeel a guideline is being feel a guideline is being feel a guideline is beingbroken or if you do not broken or if you do not broken or if you do notunderstand what is going on. understand what is going on. understand what is going on.Guidelines Yellow Card! Guidelines Yellow Card! Guidelines Yellow Card!Use the yellow card to help Use the yellow card to help Use the yellow card to helpthe group stick to the the group stick to the the group stick to theguidelines. Wave it if you guidelines. Wave it if you guidelines. Wave it if youfeel a guideline is being feel a guideline is being feel a guideline is beingbroken or if you do not broken or if you do not broken or if you do notunderstand what is going on. understand what is going on. understand what is going on.
  12. 12. Challenge Card Challenge Card Challenge CardExplain briefly to your fellow Is the group ‘being polite’ Express any feelings on theplayers what you think could and not talking about a subject that you have not yetbe the effect on future ‘taboo’ issue in relation to expressed to the group.generations. this subject? If so, say ‘We’re not talking about ...’ and start the conversation.Challenge Card Challenge Card Challenge CardPick a story card. As the “We should maximise Find out what the person oncharacter on your story card, human life and pursue all your right hand side feels onpresent to the group your avenues of research to help this subject. Find anviews on this topic. people who are ill.” Do you argument to support their agree with this statement? opinion.Challenge Card Challenge Card Challenge CardFind out what the person on Pick a Story Card character Pick a Story Card and selectyour left hand side feels on that is distant from your own one that is different fromthis subject. Play devil’s viewpoint. As that character, your own viewpoint. Tell theadvocate (disagree with their briefly tell the group your group how you think yourviewpoint). opinion on what you are own views are similar and discussing. different to the character.
  13. 13. Story Card 1 Story Card 2 Story Card 3Francis, Tanzania Emebet, Ethiopia Ruth, GhanaI’m a nurse in Tanzania. I think the I work for the Ministry of Health in I am a research physician from Ghana,main reason malaria is so widespread Ethiopia. Malaria is one of our top where malaria is the major cause ofhere is that most people just don’t health priorities here, along with HIV, death in children under five. I think weknow very much about how to prevent tuberculosis and maternal and child need a wide array of tools to fightmalaria. I see people who think any health. We have recently been able to malaria. No single tool will win thefever must be malaria, or who think train more than 30,000 health workers fight, even if antimalarial drugs,that if they show symptoms of malaria, on new guidelines to diagnose and insecticide-treated nets, and indoorthey can stay at home and take treat malaria. We have seen very spraying with insecticides are allparacetamol. Some arrive at hospital at encouraging results already. We also effective methods. But to me thethe late stages of the disease. Or they managed to distribute 20 million possibility of a vaccine against malariaget treatment, but don’t finish the insecticide-treated nets in three years. is the greatest opportunity we have ofdoses. Many go to witch doctors or use We couldn’t do this without the finally eradicating this disease. It givestraditional medicine like papaya support of global partnerships and me hope that I could see malarialeaves. I’d like to be able to educate financing. But we still have around 9 eliminated in Ghana in my lifetime,people better, but I have enough to do million new cases of malaria every although I am sure it will still need tojust working with my patients. year, in a population of 77 million be used together with the other control Ethiopians. measures, as it will not protect 100%.White Card White Card White Card
  14. 14. Story Card 4 Story Card 5 Story Card 6Milu, India Ketsholikei, Botswana Marta, NamibiaI’m a doctor in Labangi, a village in I’m 26, I’m a farmer and I have six I’m a young mum to five children, andthe east of India. Our hospital has a children. I’ve had malaria three times we live a long way from the nearestprogramme to treat all patients with in recent years. The symptoms are town. Getting to a hospital is reallyfever as if they had malaria until mainly headaches and fever. You get a difficult for us. My daughter Becri isconfirmed otherwise. This strategy is temperature. And you feel really tired, one year old, and I’m especiallynot recommended by the World Health with pains all over. With severe forms worried about her getting ill. I amOrganisation (WHO) any more. But I of it, my children run very high HIV+, which means that I am alsothink it’s been very effective. The temperatures. Every time I get ill, I more at risk from malaria. Once aWHO is concerned about malaria can’t work and I don’t have enough community health worker came to giveparasites becoming resistant to the money to feed my family. I often don’t advice on how to prevent malaria, anddrugs, but for us, this treatment is go for treatment because there is no gave us nets, to sleep under and spraysmuch cheaper. If we followed WHO money – if I can’t feed my family, I for free. But now the governmentguidelines and performed a rapid can’t afford medication. But if I am ill funding for indoor residual sprayingdiagnostic test to all patients with fever for a long period of time, who will was cut and residents in our area haveto treat only positive cases, we would provide for my family then? not received sprays, mosquito nets orspend three times the amount we window screens. There is always acurrently spend on malaria treatment. chance we can get ill, and with theWe just don’t have that kind of money. hospital so far away, I’m not sure how easily I could get treatment.White Card White Card White Card
  15. 15. Story Card 7 Story Card 8 Story Card 9Doreen, The Gambia Mamta, India Tilmann, GermanyMy son is six months old now. When I I’m a nurse in a hospital in a town in I work in drug development for agot pregnant I was really worried, the east of India. We only have limited pharmaceutical company. We offer ourbecause a few of my friends have got facilities, so normally pregnant women malaria treatments for adults andmalaria during their pregnancy. But or babies with symptoms of malaria children at the lowest cost possible. Asmy aunt gave me a mosquito net to might have to share beds or sleep on pharmaceutical companies are private,sleep under while I was pregnant, and the floor if they are with us longer than for profit organisations it is importantthe hospital gave me some pills to 48 hours. Babies born to mothers with to incentivise them by various meansprevent me from getting malaria. My malaria are often very underweight, so to invest in research and developmentson is healthy for now, but I’m always we try to keep them warm. for malaria. Public-private partnershipsworried, he could get severely ill at We used to use a drug called have worked very well to achieve this.any time. I noticed that the net we chloroquine to protect people from Governments can also help bysleep under is not keeping the malaria. But now it has been speeding up the reviews of new drugmosquitoes away like it used to, but I withdrawn because the parasite that applications, for example.can’t afford a new one. It’s certainly causes the disease became resistant to For our company, malaria treatmentsgoing to be difficult to afford any more chloroquine. So now nets treated with are part of a strategy for sustainabletreatment, if he does get ill. insecticides are our main method of growth and our corporate social preventing malaria infection. responsibility. Last year alone, our access to medicine programme reached 74 million patients and was valued at over €1 billion or 3% of our sales.White Card White Card White Card
  16. 16. Story Card 10Thocco, MalawiI’m a teacher in the Mangochi districtin Malawi. A few years ago, I hadtraining to treat malaria in school usinga Pupil Treatment Kit. I was trained torecognise symptoms and give thetreatment safely. I could then treatstudents that got ill, and if theircondition didn’t improve, I sent themto the hospital. The kits cost €50 forthe school every year, and we had toask parents and communities to covermost of the cost. Now the governmenthas withdrawn the kits, saying there isa new treatment which we cannotadminister. I have to admit I feel morecomfortable sending the children tohospital to be treated properly,although it’s true that they miss a lot ofschool because of malaria.White Card White Card White Card
  17. 17. Name of cluster:Which conclusions does this cluster lead you to?Cards in this cluster: Info Card Issue Card Story Card White Card
  18. 18. Name of cluster:Which conclusions does this cluster lead you to?Cards in this cluster: Info Card Issue Card Story Card White Card
  19. 19. Name of cluster:Which conclusions does this cluster lead you to?Cards in this cluster: Info Card Issue Card Story Card White Card
  20. 20. Policy positions for Malaria 1 2 3 4 5 Positions Support +++ 1 Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, treatment and diagnosis, programmes and research, split ++ proportionally according to the amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation. 2 + Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, programmes and research, split proportionally according to the Acceptable amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation, but safeguard the budget for treatment and diagnosis. - 3 Spend €0.5 billion less across treatment and diagnosis, -- programmes and research, split proportionally according to the amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation, but safeguard the budget for prevention. --- 4 Not acceptable Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, treatment and diagnosis and programmes, split proportionally according to the amounts suggested by the World Abstain Health Organisation, but safeguard the budget for research. 5 Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, treatment and diagnosis, programmes and research, but cut the budget by region according to the level of poverty in the region. Regions with lower levels of poverty will have their budget cut more.
  21. 21. Policy positions for Malaria 1 2 3 4 Positions Support +++ 1 ..................................................................................... ++ ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... + ..................................................................................... Acceptable 2 - ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... -- ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... --- Not acceptable 3 ..................................................................................... Abstain ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... 4 ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................... .....................................................................................
  22. 22. Story Card Info Card Info Card Initial ThoughtsMalaria Write down your initial thoughts, use White cards to add issuesMalaria is a common parasitic disease, caused by a parasite transmitted from human to human via amosquito. Three billion people are at risk of malaria. It was responsible for nearly 800,000 deaths .........................................................worldwide in 2010. The WHO estimates that around €4 billion is necessary in order to tackle malariaduring the year 2015. .........................................................• €2.7 billion must be raised for prevention (preventive treatment for pregnant women, andinsecticide-treated nets and insecticide for indoor residual spraying) .........................................................• €0.4 billion must be raised for treatment and diagnosis (anti-malarial drugs and severe casemanagement, and rapid diagnostic tests)• €0.6 billion must be raised for programmes (reinforcing healthcare systems, training and pay for .........................................................medical staff in countries affected and educating citizens)• €0.6 billion must be raised for research (developing a vaccine and new drugs, and improving .........................................................diagnostics, treatment and prevention)Policymakers and NGOs must make efforts to ensure all these targets are met. But if only €3.5 billion .........................................................of the necessary €4 billion is raised, how should the spending be distributed?Positions ......................................................... 1. Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, treatment and diagnosis, programmes and research, ......................................................... split proportionally according to the amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation. 2. Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, programmes and research, split proportionally ......................................................... according to the amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation, but safeguard the budget for treatment and diagnosis. 3. Spend €0.5 billion less across treatment and diagnosis, programmes and research, split proportionally according to the amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation, but safeguard the budget for prevention. Issue Card Issue Card Challenge Card 4. Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, treatment and diagnosis and programmes, split proportionally according to the amounts suggested by the World Health Organisation, but safeguard the budget for research. 5. Spend €0.5 billion less across prevention, treatment and diagnosis, programmes and research, but cut the budget by region according to the level of poverty in the region. Regions with lower levels of poverty will have their budget cut more.Aims of the game- Clarify what your opinions are- Work towards a shared group vision- Let your voice be heard in Europe- Enjoy discussing!Photo credits1 & 6: Gates Foundation, Flickr. 2: Babasteve, Flickr. 3: IITA Image Library, Flickr. 4: ReSurgeInternational, Flickr. 5: Yuen-Ping aka YP, Flickr. 7: Daltoris, Flickr. 8: zz77, Flickr. 9: C+H, Flickr. 10:Matt Floreen, Flickr.Guidelines Three stages . . . plus oneYou have a right to a voice: speak your truth.But not the whole truth: dont go on and on. 1. Information 2. Discussion 3. Shared group response 4. Action Clarify your personal view on the Together with the other players, start Reflect on the theme(s) that the group Go to www.playdecide.eu to:Value your life learning. subject, reading and selecting the discussing and identify one or more has identified and the cards that - Submit the results of your group to the Decide database; cards which you feel are most larger themes that you all feel relevant. sustain the arguments. As a group, can - See how other European countries think about this issue;Respect other people. important for you. Place your cards on Everyone gets a chance to speak. Put you reach a positive consensus on a - Read more about this subject;Allow them to finish before you speak. the placemat and then read them aloud your cards on the table to provide your policy position that reflects the groups - Download a game kit to play with your friends or colleagues; to the other players. arguments for each theme. view? - Learn how you can make a difference after playing Decide.Delight in diversity. You can formulate a new commonWelcome surprise or confusion as a sign that youve let in new thoughts or ± 30 MIN. ± 30 MIN. policy, if you wish. Dont forget to publish a post on the Xplore Health blog to share yourfeelings. experiences with other audiences! ± 20 MIN.Look for common ground.But emphasises difference; and emphasises similarity.

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