DECORATING THE WORLD          WITH INKJET                   Dr Tim Phillips            Xennia Technology Ltd
Background  Xennia is a leading industrial inkjet solutions provider  16 year history of technology development  World cla...
The continuing industrial inkjet story
Why inkjet?                Non-contact Deposit directly on to fragile or 3D surfaces    Build composites and 3D structures...
Inkjet adoption              Labels                        Textiles (apparel) Ceramics (tiles)                            ...
Adoption of industrial inkjet       Digital graphics is a mature industry       Ceramic tile printing approaching mainstre...
Market sizes    Excluding WF graphics at $6.3B currently
Ceramic printing        Mainstream application with many competing suppliers
Crossing the chasm Why are some industries slower than others in adopting digital?    Market pull – how compelling are the...
Solution requirements Industrial inkjet solutions must have the following:     Excellent image quality     Good durability...
Design - leveraging the inkjet advantage
Design – a key driver Consumers (and their suppliers) don‟t buy technology     They buy designs!     The end result is key...
Adoption of digital Requires a paradigm shift in design-led thinking Part of the “chasm” Manufacturers have many years of ...
Inkjet vs. Analogue  Achievable colour palette generally wider using inkjet  Colour toning is achieved on the substrate us...
New developments in inkjet technology
Printhead technology Advanced print head design is allowing inkjet to become mainstream     Major manufacturers Xaar, Kyoc...
Printheads                                                                                              Xaar 1001 GS12    ...
Software A digitally defined image gives limitless possibilities – software is key Product detection     Detects position ...
Ink            Ceramic applications                  Wider colour gamut                         New colour possibilities  ...
Key applications for inkjet
What can be printed on? Established:     Paper/Cardboard     Vinyl Moving to the mainstream:     Industrial plastics     C...
Ceramic tile market Worldwide ceramic tile output > 9,500M sq m (2010) Production focussed in Asia and EU (2009 numbers)  ...
Ceramics market drivers Shorter product lifecycles and print runs Natural randomisation Desire for greater product differe...
Ceramics market need Market requirement for ceramic tile printing Printing system    High productivity (>900 m2/hr)    Hig...
Textiles market RTR digital textile market 2010    Hardware $137m (6% growth)    Ink $454m (15% growth)    Printed output ...
Textile market drivers  Drivers towards digital printing       Reduced time to introduce new designs (few hours versus sev...
Textile market requirement Market requirement for RTR textiles Printing system    High productivity (>300 m2/hr)    High r...
Decorative laminate market US decorative laminate sales $6.4Bn in 2009 Forecast to rise 3.3% p.a. to 14 Bn ft2, $8.9 Bn in...
Furnishing laminate decoration Requirement for high throughput printing Flexible laminates – papers and films Also direct ...
Decoration market drivers Currently dominated by screen and flexo Drivers towards inkjet    Move beyond commodity designs ...
Wall covering market Overall wall coverings market forecast to reach $26 Bn by 2015    Boosted by recovering world market ...
Wall coverings Requirement for high throughput printing    High quality    Economic    Flexible Paper substrates    Solven...
Wall covering market drivers Currently dominated by flexo and gravure Drivers towards inkjet    Faster introduction of new...
Glass decoration market Worldwide fabricated glass market $66Bn in 2010    Standard flat glass plus value-added - laminate...
Glass decoration Fixed array production system for high volume Flatbed scanning system for small batches Print onto:     G...
Glass decoration drivers Drive to value-added products    Environmental, safety including earthquake, hurricane    Design ...
Decoration and functionality combined- Digital Fabrication
DigiNova – EU project Key objective: Determine the current status and assess and promote the expected potential of Digital...
Architectural glass Digital decoration and functionality = powerful combination Architectural glass                       ...
Ceramic tiles Ceramic tile flooring                         Natural effects                          Self cleaning        ...
Sun awnings Sun Awnings    Digital decoration and digital finishing                                                 Vibran...
Apparel fabrics Apparel fabrics    Multi functionality        Single sided application possible        Two sides can have ...
Summary     Demand for high quality, flexible designs favour digital     Paradigm shift needed in design led thinking     ...
Decorating The World With Inkjet - IMI European Inkjet Conference November 2012 annual inkjet conf tjp nov 2012
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Decorating The World With Inkjet - IMI European Inkjet Conference November 2012 annual inkjet conf tjp nov 2012

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A talk outlining the issues behind technology adoption in inkjet end-user markets, and assessing the technology being developed to overcome this.

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Decorating The World With Inkjet - IMI European Inkjet Conference November 2012 annual inkjet conf tjp nov 2012

  1. 1. DECORATING THE WORLD WITH INKJET Dr Tim Phillips Xennia Technology Ltd
  2. 2. Background Xennia is a leading industrial inkjet solutions provider 16 year history of technology development World class reputation underpinned by a strong IP portfolio Unique combination of inkjet chemistry and engineering expertise Headquarters and manufacturing facility in UK Sales offices in India, China and Brazil Awarded Queen‟s Award for Enterprise in 2010 Offering reliable inkjet process solutions: Inkjet modules and inks for OEM partners Printing systems and inks for end users through distributors
  3. 3. The continuing industrial inkjet story
  4. 4. Why inkjet? Non-contact Deposit directly on to fragile or 3D surfaces Build composites and 3D structures Digital control Alter deposition patterns at will Equally suited to short or long runs Deposit only where needed Functional materials Organic, inorganic and biomaterials Solutions, colloids and emulsions Deposit what you want, where you want, when you want!
  5. 5. Inkjet adoption Labels Textiles (apparel) Ceramics (tiles) Graphics Textiles (interiors)Furnishing “Crossing the Chasm” – Geoffrey Moore
  6. 6. Adoption of industrial inkjet Digital graphics is a mature industry Ceramic tile printing approaching mainstream Digital equipment sales now exceed analogue sales Total 10,000 printing lines installed worldwide By end of 2012, 17% of this total will have converted to digital By end of 2015, expect more than half to have converted to digital Other markets at an earlier stage What are the reasons for this? What is the „chasm‟?Source: Ceramics World
  7. 7. Market sizes Excluding WF graphics at $6.3B currently
  8. 8. Ceramic printing Mainstream application with many competing suppliers
  9. 9. Crossing the chasm Why are some industries slower than others in adopting digital? Market pull – how compelling are the digital advantages? Economics – cost, availability of investment, etc Technology – how well are the market needs met? Communication – does the market understand the benefits?
  10. 10. Solution requirements Industrial inkjet solutions must have the following: Excellent image quality Good durability of the printed image Required productivity Production reliability User friendly and powerful software
  11. 11. Design - leveraging the inkjet advantage
  12. 12. Design – a key driver Consumers (and their suppliers) don‟t buy technology They buy designs! The end result is key – technology is a means The key market pull is demand for Image variation/randomisation Natural effects Colour gradients High quality/detail Other new possibilities New developments in printing technology enables new designs
  13. 13. Adoption of digital Requires a paradigm shift in design-led thinking Part of the “chasm” Manufacturers have many years of experience with existing printing Design to the strengths (and weaknesses) of existing technology Attempting to reproduce existing designs is missing the point And the opportunity
  14. 14. Inkjet vs. Analogue Achievable colour palette generally wider using inkjet Colour toning is achieved on the substrate using inkjet Colour separation is carried out in software Screen printing colour separation: 8 different colours = 8 different screens Inkjet adds value to the end product Software enables to produce a wide range of designs Software randomly selects designs from one very large image Natural looking end product = increased value New printing technology leads more interesting designs If used properly
  15. 15. New developments in inkjet technology
  16. 16. Printhead technology Advanced print head design is allowing inkjet to become mainstream Major manufacturers Xaar, Kyocera, ToshibaTEC and Spectra Dimatix Fulfilling the demand for High quality High productivity Increased reliability Advanced technology to support complex ink and fluid chemistries
  17. 17. Printheads Xaar 1001 GS12 Kyocera – high speed UV/aqueous Double colour intensity Double colour head Double speed Source: http://global.kyocera.com/news/2012/0801_aoik.html Source: http://www.xaar.com/uploads/xaar_datasheet_1001_issue3_lo[1].pdf Spectra Dimatix Starfire SG-1024M-C Binary and greyscale TTEC CF1L Recirculating Double colour intensity 20-30 picolitre drop size, 400 dpi Double speed Ceramic and other decorative applicationsSource :http://www.fujifilmusa.com/press/news/display_news?newsID=880302http://www.fujifilmusa.com/shared/bin/PDS00078%20Rev00.pdf
  18. 18. Software A digitally defined image gives limitless possibilities – software is key Product detection Detects position and orientation of product, aligns image Product recognition Prints image specific to the product – e.g. tile relief Integration with rest of production line Images, product codes etc can be defined in real time Direct to print from the internet Cutting supply chains Reduced labour costs Local production
  19. 19. Ink Ceramic applications Wider colour gamut New colour possibilities Combination of ink and glaze Special effects Textile applications High colour gamut dye inks Ink specific to substrates of interest Other applications Reduced irritability UV curable inkjet ink Lower temperature conductive inksSource: http://www.ricoh.com/release/2012/0906_1.html,http://www.novacentrix.com/about_us/news_events_3_0_2.pdf
  20. 20. Key applications for inkjet
  21. 21. What can be printed on? Established: Paper/Cardboard Vinyl Moving to the mainstream: Industrial plastics Ceramics Natural and synthetic textiles Growing demand: Architectural glass Appliance and automotive glass Metals Printed electronics etc
  22. 22. Ceramic tile market Worldwide ceramic tile output > 9,500M sq m (2010) Production focussed in Asia and EU (2009 numbers) Asia 65.1% (+7.1% from 2008) EU 12.6% (-24.8%) Central/South America 10.5% (-0.8%) Other Europe (incl. Turkey) 4.6% (-10.4%) Equipment sales in 2008 > $800M Source: Ceramic World Review 2010
  23. 23. Ceramics market drivers Shorter product lifecycles and print runs Natural randomisation Desire for greater product differentiation Bevelled edges Textured surfaces Customisation and personalisation Wider range of tile types Different firing regimes for different materials Thinner tiles use less material (inkjet is non-contact) Cost reduction – reduced inventory Higher yield Better quality
  24. 24. Ceramics market need Market requirement for ceramic tile printing Printing system High productivity (>900 m2/hr) High reliability (>98% up time) Cost effective High quality (300+dpi, greyscale,) Good colour performance (4+ colours) Inks Excellent colour performance when fired Good reliability in system Lower operating costs
  25. 25. Textiles market RTR digital textile market 2010 Hardware $137m (6% growth) Ink $454m (15% growth) Printed output value $1.3Bn (13% growth) DTG digital textile market 2010 Hardware $184m (23% growth „opportunity for ~10,000 high end units‟) Ink $145m (32% growth) Printed output $2.45Bn (35% growth) Systems from Mimaki, Roland, Mutoh (low end) Robustelli, Reggiani, Konica Minolta, Osiris (high end) Inks from Huntsman, Dupont, Xennia, Dystar, BASF, Kiian, Sensient etc Source: IT Strategies Spring 2009
  26. 26. Textile market drivers Drivers towards digital printing Reduced time to introduce new designs (few hours versus several days) Lower energy consumption Lower water and materials consumption Reduced cost to introduce new designs (no requirement to make screens) Competitive for shorter runs Example: lower cost below 1,200m for 8 colour screen versus typical digital Current typical digital cost €3-5/m2 Average run length decreasing Now below 2,000m, was 3,500m in 1994 Promise of even lower digital costs, lower at all run lengths Huge potential for digital textile printingSource: Gherzi
  27. 27. Textile market requirement Market requirement for RTR textiles Printing system High productivity (>300 m2/hr) High reliability (>98% up time) Cost effective High quality (600+dpi, greyscale, 6+ colours) Inks Excellent colour performance (competitive with analogue) Excellent fastness performance (competitive with analogue) Ink costs that give printed cost < analogue for required run length
  28. 28. Decorative laminate market US decorative laminate sales $6.4Bn in 2009 Forecast to rise 3.3% p.a. to 14 Bn ft2, $8.9 Bn in 2013 Global market > $21.2 Bn in 2009, Europe ~ 28.5% Asia Pacific sales projected to exceed US sales by 2012 US demand breakdown (2008) 29% low basis weight papers 13% decorative foils 22% saturated papers 16% vinyl films 18% high pressure laminates 2% edge banding Source: Pira Industrial Inkjet 2009, Freedonia Group
  29. 29. Furnishing laminate decoration Requirement for high throughput printing Flexible laminates – papers and films Also direct printing onto wood, MDF etc Laminates Solvent or aqueous inks (aqueous preferred) Compatibility with existing lamination process vital Direct printing UV (or solvent) inks Edge banding UV inks Requirement for colour matching/metamerism
  30. 30. Decoration market drivers Currently dominated by screen and flexo Drivers towards inkjet Move beyond commodity designs Experimental fashions Customised surfaces – logos & murals Customisation and short runs Market requirements Flatbed digital printing of rigid furnishings up to 1.5 x 1.0 m UV ink Continuous printing of flexible laminate films/decor paper (~2m wide) Solvent/aqueous ink Source: Pira Industrial Inkjet 2009
  31. 31. Wall covering market Overall wall coverings market forecast to reach $26 Bn by 2015 Boosted by recovering world market and expansion in residential construction UK: wall covering expenditure £315m, compared with £440m on ceramic tiles (2009) Down 6.5% on previous year Source: Durability and Design, 2011
  32. 32. Wall coverings Requirement for high throughput printing High quality Economic Flexible Paper substrates Solvent inks Aqueous inks (preferred) UV inks(?) Flexibility to print various designs/patterns Customised wall murals
  33. 33. Wall covering market drivers Currently dominated by flexo and gravure Drivers towards inkjet Faster introduction of new designs Experimental fashions Customised printing – murals etc Shorter run lengths Market requirements Continuous printing of paper & vinyl wall coverings Solvent/aqueous ink Source: Freedonia
  34. 34. Glass decoration market Worldwide fabricated glass market $66Bn in 2010 Standard flat glass plus value-added - laminated, insulating etc Growth 5% Applications Construction/architectural (65%) Automotive (25%) Speciality (furniture, mirror) (10%) Printed glass market $1.3Bn Mainly architectural and appliance (plus automotive) Mainly screen at present Source: Pilkington Glass Report 2009
  35. 35. Glass decoration Fixed array production system for high volume Flatbed scanning system for small batches Print onto: Glass during manufacture PVB film prior to lamination Glass after manufacture All need specific inks Firing ink PVB compatible ink UV inks
  36. 36. Glass decoration drivers Drive to value-added products Environmental, safety including earthquake, hurricane Design Dominated by screen printing at present Market requirements Flatbed digital printing of single sheets up to 2m x 4m (or larger) UV ink Continuous printing of glass during production Ceramic ink
  37. 37. Decoration and functionality combined- Digital Fabrication
  38. 38. DigiNova – EU project Key objective: Determine the current status and assess and promote the expected potential of Digital Fabrication for the future of materials research and manufacturing in Europe Identify most attractive innovative product categories for applications of new materials and processes in 20 years time Digital Fabrication can be defined as a new kind of industry that uses computer-controlled tools and processes to transform digital designs and materials directly into useful products.
  39. 39. Architectural glass Digital decoration and functionality = powerful combination Architectural glass Etch effect printed glass Self cleaning IR blocking on glass to regulate temperature
  40. 40. Ceramic tiles Ceramic tile flooring Natural effects Self cleaning Printed relief
  41. 41. Sun awnings Sun Awnings Digital decoration and digital finishing Vibrant designs Antimicrobial coating Dirt repellent
  42. 42. Apparel fabrics Apparel fabrics Multi functionality Single sided application possible Two sides can have different functions Patterning – place function where you want it Vibrant designs Hydrophobic coating Functional devices
  43. 43. Summary Demand for high quality, flexible designs favour digital Paradigm shift needed in design led thinking Advances in technology open doors to new industrial applications Digital decoration combined with digital functionality will transform the industry Digital printing to account for 18% of all industrial print by 2016Source: Pira Industrial 2011

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