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Webinar: Powering Vehicles With Waste

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Leading policy, industry and technical experts to discuss the production of renewable natural gas for vehicle fuel and its role as a climate change strategy in the United States.

Learn more at https://www.wri.org/events/2018/04/webinar-powering-vehicles-waste-renewable-natural-gas

Join the conversation: #RenewableNaturalGas or #Biomethane

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Webinar: Powering Vehicles With Waste

  1. 1. Webinar | Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Powering Vehicles With Waste: Renewable Natural Gas as a Climate Strategy
  2. 2. World Resources Institute Providing support for achieving emission reductions and analysis on how leaders can achieve a stronger, cleaner economy.
  3. 3. What is Renewable Natural Gas (RNG)? ● Biogas that has been processed into essentially pure methane, which can be used interchangeably with conventional natural gas in all its end uses. ● Other terms: upgraded biogas, biomethane, green gas. ● RNG is primarily made from anaerobic digestion of wet organic wastes.
  4. 4. Outline Anelia Milbrandt, Senior Analyst, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ● Wet waste-to-energy resource potential in the United States. ● Example of ongoing work estimating feedstock cost. Rebecca Gasper, Research Associate, World Resources Institute. ● New research on RNG as a climate strategy. ● Most promising RNG sources. Patrick Browne, Director of Global Sustainability, UPS. ● Case study of RNG use in UPS’ vehicle fleets. ● How RNG fits into UPS greenhouse gas and sustainability goals. Speakers will answer participants’ questions following the presentation.
  5. 5. Q&A at the end Feel free to submit your questions in the webinar submission “questions” box or email them to yelena.akopian@wri.org during the presentation.
  6. 6. Anelia Milbrandt Senior Analyst, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Natural Gas Potential in the United States: Resource Distribution, Quantity and Prices
  7. 7. Renewable Natural Gas Sources • RNG sources (wet Waste-to-Energy [WTE] resources) include: • Animal manure • Fats, oils, and greases (FOG) • Sewage sludge • Food waste • These materials are used to produce biogas (RNG), combusted, and are also of interest to advanced WTE applications such as hydrothermal liquefaction.
  8. 8. Geographic Distribution of RNG Sources Milbrandt, A., Seiple, T., Heimiller, D., Coleman, A., Skaggs, R. “Wet Waste-to-Energy Resources in the United States”. Submitted to Resources, Conservation & Recycling.; Seiple, T. et al. “Municipal wastewater sludge as a sustainable bioresource in the United States”. Journal of Environmental Management. Volume 197, July 2017, Pages 673-680. DO NOT CITE OR DISTRIBUTE
  9. 9. RNG Potential Wet WTE resources have the equivalent energy content of about one quad or 7 billion diesel gallon equivalent (DGE) per year. 18% of 2016 US On-Highway Diesel Consumption U.S. RNG production for transportation under the RFS Source: EPA Milbrandt, A., Seiple, T., Heimiller, D., Coleman, A., Skaggs, R. “Wet Waste-to-Energy; Resource Assessment in the United States”. Submitted to Resources, Conservation & Recycling. Less than 2% of the estimated resource potential is currently utilized for RNG production.
  10. 10. RNG Feedstock Prices Methodology: model-derived estimates considering the following inputs: • Resource quantity. • Collection cost (if applicable). • Processing cost (e.g. dewatering, storage, de-packaging). • Disposal method/cost (e.g. tipping fee). Highlights: • Wet WTE feedstocks exhibit different prices across geographic areas. • Feedstocks can be treated as commodities or wastes depending on location and markets. • If treated as a waste, feedstock price is controlled by the cost of its disposal. • If the waste has been commoditized, its price is determined by market demand.
  11. 11. RNG Feedstock Prices (Example) Badgett, A., Newes, E., Milbrandt, A. 2018. “Economic Analysis of Wet Waste-to-Energy Resources in the United States”. Bioresource Technology. In preparation. DO NOT CITE OR DISTRIBUTE • Price of food waste is variable across the US as a function of regional economics and policy. • Non-residential food waste: states with organic waste bans exhibit the lowest (negative) feedstock cost. • Residential food waste: prices depend on collection radius and landfill tipping fees.
  12. 12. Acknowledgements DOE’s Bioenergy Technologies Office: Brandon Hoffman and David Babson Allegheny Science & Technology: Mark Philbrick NREL Team PNNL Team Alex Badgett Richard Skaggs Donna Heimiller Timothy Seiple Emily Newes Andre Coleman
  13. 13. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Thank You
  14. 14. Rebecca Gasper Research Associate, World Resources Institute New Research on the Potential for Renewable Natural Gas as a Climate Strategy
  15. 15. RNG Production is on the Rise 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 millionethanol-equivalentgallons Renewable Natural Gas Other Cellulosic Biofuel Required Cellulosic Volume Source: U.S. EPA, 2018
  16. 16. RNG as a Climate Strategy • How can RNG reduce greenhouse gas emissions? • Which project types achieve the largest GHG reductions? • Is RNG economically feasible? Access the publication at: www.WRI.org/RNG
  17. 17. Key Findings 1. RNG can reduce GHGs when: • It is made from waste; • Its production captures methane. 2. RNG from food/yard waste and manure projects can deliver the largest GHG reductions. 3. These projects are economically feasible with incentives, but barriers remain. Photo: Flickr; California Energy Commission; “CleanWorld Sacramento Bioigester”
  18. 18. How Can RNG Production & Use Reduce Emissions? Source: U.S. EPA, 2017
  19. 19. How Can RNG Production and Use Reduce GHG Emissions? Source: WRI, 2018 Waste Managed in its Usual Way
  20. 20. Source: WRI, 2018 How Can RNG Production and Use Reduce GHG Emissions? Waste Used to Make RNG Instead
  21. 21. RNG is Most Likely to Achieve Large GHG Reductions When: It is made from waste Its production captures methane CH4
  22. 22. Source: WRI, 2018 When RNG Meets These Two Conditions, Avoided Emissions Can Entirely Outweigh Emissions from its Production and Use
  23. 23. Which RNG Project Types Can Meet These Criteria? Food scraps, yard trimmings. Sludge where methane is uncontrolled. Manure where methane is uncontrolled. Landfills where methane is uncontrolled or methane capture increases.
  24. 24. Diverted Food Waste and Manure Projects are Especially Promising Source: CARB, 2018
  25. 25. • Columbus, Ohio • Fair Oaks Dairy, Indiana Photo Credit: Fair Oaks Farms Adventure Center; Flickr Successful Projects are Up and Running in...
  26. 26. But Challenges Remain Source: WRI, 2018 Value of Incentives: RFS: $20/MMBtu LCFS: $4-45/MMBtu
  27. 27. Photo: Nicholas Tonelli, Flickr • RNG could play a role in climate change strategies. • RNG can reduce GHG emissions and meet other environmental, social goals. • To ensure large GHG reductions, RNG must be made from waste that would otherwise emit methane. • Impacts should be assessed on a case-by-case basis. Conclusions
  28. 28. Patrick Browne Director of Global Sustainability, UPS How RNG Fits Into a Business’ Greenhouse Gas and Sustainability Goals.
  29. 29. Proprietary and Confidential: This presentation may not be used or disclosed to others unless expressly authorized by UPS, NREL, and WRI.
  30. 30. Environmental Goals Proprietary and Confidential: This presentation may not be used or disclosed to others unless expressly authorized by UPS, NREL, and WRI.
  31. 31. The UPS Rolling Lab Tests New Tech in Real Time Proprietary and Confidential: This presentation may not be used or disclosed to others unless expressly authorized by UPS, NREL, and WRI.
  32. 32. UPS Investments Drive Alternative Fuel Market 37 CNG sites 15 LNG sites 55 Propane sites combined gallons (DGE) of natural gas 191M since 2014 62M gallons of Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) 19.8M since 2014 15M 11M gallons of Renewable Diesel (RD) 32M since 2014 >$750 million global investment in natural gas vehicles and fueling stations Since 2009 Proprietary and Confidential: This presentation may not be used or disclosed to others unless expressly authorized by UPS, NREL, and WRI.
  33. 33. Alternative Fuel Station Footprint - U.S. Domestic Vancouver, BC Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - 15 total Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) - 37 total Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) - 55 total Electric Vehicles (EV) – 31 total Renewable Natural Gas Renewable Diesel Natural Gas Tractors: >7M miles/week Diesel Tractors: >15M miles/week Updated as of 03/22/2018 Proprietary and Confidential: This presentation may not be used or disclosed to others unless expressly authorized by UPS, NREL, and WRI.
  34. 34. Q&A Please submit your questions in the webinar submission “questions” box or email them to yelena.akopian@wri.org
  35. 35. For any further questions and if you would like to get in touch with the speakers, please contact: andrew.pickens@wri.org New WRI research on Renewable Natural Gas as a climate strategy: www.WRI.org/RNG Thank you for joining!

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