Food Security and Sustainable Resource Use: Comments

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Presentation by Sara Scherr (President, EcoAgriculture Partners) at the May 15, 2013 event "Natural Resource Management and Food Security for a Growing Population". For more information visit: http://www.wri.org/event/2013/05/natural-resource-management-and-food-security-growing-population

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Food Security and Sustainable Resource Use: Comments

  1. 1. Food Security and Sustainable Resource Use: Comments Sara J. Scherr, President, EcoAgriculture Partners Natural Resource Management and Food Security for a Growing Population World Resources Institute,Washington, DC – May 15, 2013
  2. 2. Securing Food Supply in the 21st Century: Beyond Field-Scale Productivity
  3. 3. More than Food: Societal Demands from Agricultural Landscapes
  4. 4. Beyond Resource Use Efficiency: Negotiating Whole Landscape System Efficiency
  5. 5. Whole Landscapes for Food, Fiber, Energy, Health, Water,Livelihoods,Biodiversity,Ecosystem,Climate
  6. 6. Integrated Landscapes: Key Features 1) Agreed management objectives encompass multiple landscape benefits 2) Collaborative, community-engaged processes are in place for dialogue, planning, negotiating and monitoring decisions 3) Production practices contribute to multiple objectives at farm and landscape scales 4) Interactions among different parts of the landscape realize positive socio- ecological synergies or mitigate negative trade-offs 5) Market, tenure and policy frameworks are shaped to achieve the diverse set of landscape objectives
  7. 7. LandscapeTransformation in Ethiopia ● Operating as MERET since 2002, 400,000 has degraded land rehabiliated in 451 sub- watersheds, 125,000 direct beneficiaries, 40% female ● Menu of 48 activities in AE/E and Livelihoods and Local Level Participatory Planning Approach (LLPPA) ● Impacts inTigray: ● Investment in re-vegetation, terracing, community and farm-scale water harvesting restored water (ground, farm, streams) ● Irrigation & improved soil organic matter increased crop production 200-400% ● Dependence on food aid during droughts reduced from 90 to 10% households ● Transformation within 5-10 years ● Climate mitigation at landscape scale ● Institutionalization of approach in Ethiopia
  8. 8. LandscapeTransformation in Ecuador ● Community Consortium of River JubonesWatershed--socio-ecological interactions for food & water security ● Since 2000; now 37 municipal govts ● ‘Territorial facilitators’ for action  Income diversification  Increased farm production, using agro-ecological methods  New markets incl. eco-markets  Improved well-being of women, children  Protection of water sources through community-based water users associations  Restoration of riparian habitat  Coordinated legal and policy action
  9. 9. An Explosion of Innovation on the Ground
  10. 10. Ongoing Integrated Landscape Initiatives Latin America & Caribbean Sub-Saharan Africa # Integrated Landscape Initiatives Identified 104 87 # Countries Represented 21 33 Most Common Motivations for Stakeholder Collaboration Biodiversity Conservation, Reducing Natural Resource Degradation Biodiversity and Natural Resource Conservation Average # Stakeholders Involved in Initiative (primary stakeholders) 11 (farmers, local government, NGOs) 9+ (local/district government, NGOs, producer groups) Core Investment Domains Institutional planning & coordination, Agricultural production, Conservation & Livelihoods Institutional planning & coordination; Conservation; Agricultural production Milder, et al. Unpublished Data
  11. 11. Leaders Overcoming Institutional Silos and Fragmentation of Effort
  12. 12. Agroecological Practices that Generate Both HigherYields and Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Service Conservation Agriculture Holistic Grazing Organic Agriculture Precision Agriculture System of Rice Intensification Number of studies that indicate positive, neutral or negative outcomes for select system & service combinations. + = - + = - + = - + = - + = - Pest Control 1 2 4 7 6 Soil Fertility & Structure 14 2 4 4 3 3 55 8 1 1 12 2 1 Nutrient Cycling 6 1 2 2 1 1 23 39 5 12 2 Wild Biodiversity 3 11 23 1 2 Erosion Control 10 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H20 qual. & quant. 16 2 2 1 1 9 52 2 Garbach, et al. 2012. ‘An Assessment of the Multi-Functionality of Agroecological Intensification.’ EcoAgriculture Partners: Washington, DC.total # of studies reviewed = 219
  13. 13. Farmers Mobilizing for Land Stewardship Jointly with Production and Market Access
  14. 14. Prgrams to Restore Ecosystem Function in Ag Landscapes
  15. 15. www.landscapes.ecoagriculture.org
  16. 16. 1) Promote Adoption of Known Best Practices
  17. 17. 2) Support Initiatives Advancing Multi-Objective Farms and Landscapes
  18. 18. 3) Focus Advanced Science on Multi- Functional Systems
  19. 19. Thank you www.ecoagriculture.org landscapes.ecoagriculture.org

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