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How to Engage with the Talanoa Dialogue and Step Up Climate Action in 2018

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The first global stocktaking exercise of the Paris Agreement has officially begun with the opening of a new online portal for the 2018 Talanoa Dialogue. Here's how you can engage with the Talanoa Dialogue and jumpstart climate action in 2018.

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How to Engage with the Talanoa Dialogue and Step Up Climate Action in 2018

  1. 1. WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE David Waskow Director, International Climate Action Initiative Paula Caballero Global Director, Climate Program
  2. 2. Q&A • Use the question box on the GoTo webinar toolbar to enter your question at anytime • Note who the question is for and please be brief • Main Q&A portion of webinar will begin after panelist presentations
  3. 3. AMBASSADOR KHAN JOINS FROM FIJI For further information: talanoa@unfccc.int
  4. 4. 2018 TALANOA DIALOGUE
  5. 5. WHAT IS TALANOA?
  6. 6. TALANOA DIALOGUE ONLINE PLATFORM
  7. 7. TALANOA DIALOGUE ONLINE PLATFORM
  8. 8. TALANOA DIALOGUE ONLINE PLATFORM
  9. 9. TALANOA DIALOGUE METHODOLOGY
  10. 10. TALANOA DIALOGUE TIMELINE 1) Online Platform Launches and Submissions Open: 26 January 2018 2) Summative Report based on submissions till 02 Apr to inform and guide TD in May 3) May Inter- Sessional TD 30 April – 11 May 2018 4) IPCC report released (first week of October) and Submissions to TD Close – 29 Oct 5) Potential Extra session 6) Synthesis report 7) Pre-COP:23 – 24 October 8) COP24: 3 to 14 December Preparatory Phase Political Phase
  11. 11. Talanoadialogue.com
  12. 12. VINAKA THANK YOU #TALANOA4AMBITION
  13. 13. NEXT WEBINAR: MARCH 6TH 2:30 GMT/ 8:30AM EDT For further information: talanoa@unfccc.int
  14. 14. UNITED NATIONS CLIMATE CHANGE Dr. Martin Frick Senior Director, Policy and Program Coordination
  15. 15. 3 CORE QUESTIONS
  16. 16. WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE Eliza Northrop Associate, Climate Program
  17. 17. OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGAGEMENT
  18. 18. KEY SECTORS AND CONSTITUENCIES
  19. 19. HOLDING EVENTS “IN SUPPORT OF THE TALANOA DIALOGUE”
  20. 20. UTILIZE SOCIAL MEDIA TO BUILD AWARENESS AND MOMENTUM
  21. 21. CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK INTERNATIONAL Elise Buckle Special Projects Director
  22. 22. A DIALOGUE WITH PURPOSE: 2018, THE TRIGGER YEAR TO STEP UP CLIMATE AMBITION
  23. 23. THREE WAYS WE WILL ENGAGE TO RAISE AMBITION AND ENHANCE NDCS
  24. 24. CLIMATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Alexa Kleysteuber Deputy Secretary for Border and Intergovernmental Relations
  25. 25. GLOBAL CLIMATE ACTION SUMMIT
  26. 26. ICLEI-LOCAL GOVERNMENTS FOR SUSTAINABILITY Yunus Arikan Global Policy and Advocacy Lead
  27. 27. #Cities4Talanoa #Regions4Talanoa citiesandregions.org/talanoa
  28. 28. THE ROLE OF CITIES AND OTHER SUBNATIONAL AUTHORITIES IN IMPLEMENTING NDCS • Urban communities contribute up to 70% of energy-related global greenhouse gas emissions and they are among the most vulnerable hotspots for climate change impacts. • Current commitments by local and regional governments have the potential to reduce emissions by 5-15 gigatons by 2020 to 2030. • However, only around 60% countries have some sort of urban perspective in their national plans, according to UN Habitat figures.
  29. 29. CITIES AND REGIONS TALANOA DIALOGUES • Climate governance context in 2018: critical year for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and the Paris Agreement • The official decision adopted at COP23 encouraged national dialogues, beyond a one-off event at COP24, to take place at the local, national, regional level, involving key stakeholder groups such as local and regional governments as well as civil society – a successful outcome of COP23 Bonn- Fiji Commitment and LGMA Constituency advocacy • Leadership: local and other subnational leaders to invite national governments, including ministries climate and urbanization
  30. 30. KEY OBJECTIVES AND DELIVERABLES • Accelerate engagement of the urban community in climate action, building on the synergy of sustainable urbanization and low-emission, resilient development. • Multilevel governance: Cities and regions invite national governments to year- long dialogue bridging the New Urban Agenda and the Paris Agreement.
  31. 31. INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK • Facilitator: ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, as LGMA Focal Point and on behalf of Global Task Force of Local and Regional Governments • Special partners: Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy and UN-Habitat • In collaboration with: UNFCCC Secretariat and COP 23 Presidency • Implementing Partners: Members, Partners and initiatives of LGMA Constituency in around 40 countries worldwide - representing half of the world’s population. • Official launch: The Cities and Regions Talanoa Dialogues initiative was presented on 9 February 2018 at the 9th World Urban Forum, which took place in Kuala Lumpur.
  32. 32. WE MEAN BUSINESS COALITION Jennifer Austin Policy Director
  33. 33. •The Talanoa Dialogue is the key process for engaging in the international process this year, providing an opportunity to showcase progress to date and discuss ways business and government can work together to increase ambition. •We will focus on “How do we get there?” by demonstrating results from business commitments to climate action, new commitments by business, and specific policies needed for more ambition.
  34. 34. •We will use convenings of businesses and policymakers as an opportunity to generate inputs for the Talanoa Dialogue. These include We Mean Business partner conferences, international government meetings, and the Global Climate Action Summit. •We look forward to strong engagement with the preparatory phase of the Talanoa Dialogue in May.

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