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Accelerated Ambition: WRI Resources for Apparel Companies

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In this webinar, experts shared tools and research relevant to fashion companies seeking to address their environmental impacts.

Learn more: https://www.wri.org/events/2019/07/accelerated-ambition-wri-resources-apparel-companies

Published in: Environment
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Accelerated Ambition: WRI Resources for Apparel Companies

  1. 1. WEBINAR ACCELERATED AMBITION WRI RESOURCES FOR APPAREL COMPANIES Photo credit: Flickr/Marco Verch HOSTED BY Liz Cook Vice President for Institutional Strategy and Development
  2. 2. WRI is a global research organization that makes big ideas happen. Programs: Climate, Energy, Food, Forests, Water, Sustainable Cities, Sustainable Ocean Centers: Business, Economics, Finance, Governance
  3. 3. Global Perspective, Global Influence WRI’s network of over 900 experts and staff work throughout Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia.
  4. 4. What We Do ✓ Research ✓ Tools ✓ Standards ✓ Convenings ✓ Services OUR APPROACH Count It Change It Scale It
  5. 5. Our Tools for Companies
  6. 6. Why Apparel? Big Impacts Rising Consumption
  7. 7. Today’s Speakers MODERATOR Liz Cook Vice President for Institutional Strategy and Development Eliot Metzger Director, Sustainable Business and Innovation Cynthia Cummis Director of Private Sector Climate Mitigation Paul Reig Director, Aqueduct and Corporate Engagement Alex Perera Deputy Director, Energy Emily Neagle Manager, Corporate Consultative Group, Corporate Relations and Communications
  8. 8. We help apparel companies: • Set emissions targets that are in line with global goals Featured initiative: Cynthia Cummis Director of Private Sector Climate Mitigation Climate Program
  9. 9. The Science Based Targets initiative champions science-based target setting to boost companies’ competitive advantage in the transition to the low-carbon economy.
  10. 10. The Foundation for Science-Based Targets (SBTs) Paris Agreement • Set the global objective of limiting global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels • Pursue efforts to limit global temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C • Global CO2 emissions must fall 45% from 2010 levels by 2030, reaching “net zero” around 2050 • “Rapid and far-reaching” transitions in land, energy, industry, buildings, transport and cities are needed Link: https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15
  11. 11. What Are SBTs? • Consistent with the long-term goal of reaching net-zero emissions in 2nd half of century • Timeframe drives short-term action and enables accountability (5-15 years)
  12. 12. New Guidance for Apparel and Footwear Guidance Objectives Support apparel and footwear companies - brands, retailers, suppliers, etc. - to set ambitious, science-based GHG reduction targets: • Provide clarity on credible approaches to setting SBTs • Increase consistency across company targets • Identify barriers for setting SBTs and provide solutions • Provide examples of best practices • Highlight collaboration opportunities for reducing emissions Link: https://sciencebasedtargets.org/sector- development/apparel/
  13. 13. Addressing Emissions in Purchased Goods and Services Is Challenging • Influence and visibility into primary data and practices decline • Suppliers have multiple customers within AP/FW and other sectors • Suppliers may not have influence over their inputs (brand directed)
  14. 14. Collaboration Across the Value Chain Is Critical
  15. 15. Opportunities for Collaboration Abound
  16. 16. 12 Approved Targets, 17 More Companies Committed • Reduce absolute scope 1 and 2 emissions 95% by 2022 from a 2016 base year • Reduce absolute scope 3 emissions 30% by 2030 from a 2016 base year • Reduce absolute scope 1 and 2 emissions 35% by 2030 from a 2017 base year • Reduce absolute scope 3 emissions from purchased goods and services 60% per million euro sales by 2030 from a 2017 base year Approved Targets • ASICS Corporation, Burberry, H&M, Kering, Levi Strauss & Co., Marks & Spencer, MARUI Group Co., PUMA, Skunkfunk, Target Corporation, Tesco, Walmart Inc. Committed • ALDO, Bestseller A/S, C&A, CHANEL, Eileen Fisher, Fast Retailing Co., Gap Inc., Guess, inditex, J. Front Retailing, Nike, One Jeanswear Group, PVH, The Warehouse Group, VF Corporation, Woolworths Holdings Limited, Yunus Textile Mills
  17. 17. • With the guidance finalized, we turn to identifying the largest emissions sources and opportunities for reductions • Understanding where the reductions will come from will help companies set and deliver SBTs Mapping the Needed GHG Reductions
  18. 18. Learn More www.sciencebasedtargets.org Contact Us info@sciencebasedtargets.org Ccummis@wri.org
  19. 19. Energy Program We help apparel companies: • Tackle scope 3 emissions by engaging suppliers and their energy markets Featured initiative: Alex Perera Deputy Director, Energy
  20. 20. The CEIA is built on 3 pillars for mobilizing clean energy investment at scale: purchasers, policy & pipeline
  21. 21. • Work with large retailer (75+ centers) • SBTs of 80% renewable electricity by 2025 and 100% by 2030 • Developed Request for Proposal (RFP) and invited 21 companies • Support Mexico’s Industrial Park Association (AMPIP) • Pilot project that handles 5 industrial park groups (9 industrial parks and their tenants) In Mexico, we are helping industrial parks and retailers procure clean energy to meet their SBTs
  22. 22. • CEIA, with USAID’s Vietnam Low Emission Energy Program, is working to support a new pilot program • Program size is 300-400 MW • Working group meeting will be held in August • Companies interested in participating must sign up by the end of the year • To join our working group or learn more about our work, contact: norma.hutchinson@wri.org In Vietnam, we are leading a Direct Power Purchase Agreement pilot program and have a working group of 100+ members
  23. 23. We help apparel companies: • Measure and quantify water-related risks and opportunities across consumer markets, operations and supply chains • Develop water stewardship strategies and targets that deliver long-term value Featured initiative: Paul Reig Director, Aqueduct and Corporate Engagement Water Program
  24. 24. THIRD PARTY TOOLS API DATA DOWNLOAD AQUEDUCT TOOLS AQUEDUCT 3.0: Tools for Assessing Water Risk
  25. 25. What’s New Two main things have changed in the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas: • The indicators in the Aqueduct Water Risk Framework • The hydrological model underpinning the indicators
  26. 26. Water Risk Indicators
  27. 27. Water Risk Indicators
  28. 28. Hydrological Model • Water supply estimates include both surface and groundwater resources • Water supply and demand are calculated together • The underlying model has much higher spatial resolution. From a 1x1 degree grid (roughly 110x110 km at the equator), to a 5x5 arc minute grid (roughly to 10x10 km at the equator) • It has a more recent and higher temporal resolution. Historic daily data from January 1960 until December 2014, aggregated to monthly scores • Different hydrological sub-basin delineation
  29. 29. Why Does This Matter to You? • The results of your water risk assessment using Aqueduct 3.0 may or may not change • Any one or combination of the changes described could be driving the differences in results • Determining what is driving the change will require in-depth analysis of the local context in the area(s) of interest and close evaluation of the changes associated with the indicator values in question
  30. 30. Corporate Thought Leadership and Advisory Services Advancing sustainable water management in the private sector by driving innovation in water- related data, tools and strategies https://www.wri.org/our-work/project/corporate-water-stewardship Some of the companies we’ve worked with include: • Cargill, Inc. • Eileen Fisher • Nike, Inc. • VF Corporation
  31. 31. We help apparel companies: • Explore alternative business models that could decouple business growth from resource use Featured initiative: • Clothing Reuse Market Makers Eliot Metzger Director, Sustainable Business and Innovation Business Center
  32. 32. Source: Elephant in the Boardroom; Photo: Flickr/David Blackwell
  33. 33. Source: Quartz (qz.com); Data: American Apparel & Footwear Association
  34. 34. Source: True Cost
  35. 35. Consumer Demand Common Definitions and Ambitions Enabling Policies Clothing Reuse Market Makers
  36. 36. Significant Interest in New Clothing Reuse Business Models UK US India 39% 61% 27% 73% 10% 90% Disinterested Interested Percentage of all consumers interested in at least one of the business model propositions
  37. 37. Estimating Environmental and Social Impacts Review and road-testing beginning Summer 2019
  38. 38. Participate in Policy Inventory: http://bit.ly/CircularPolicy Policy: Shaping the External Environment for Reuse Barriers: • Tariff barriers vs. non-tariff barriers • End of life and waste classifications • Linear accounting principles and more Policies that enable circularity at scale Circular products & services Circular products & services Linear products & services Linear products & services Images adapted from Ecopreneur Enablers: • Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) • Shifting taxes from labor to resources • Wage subsidies for reuse business models • VAT reductions for reuse goods • Voluntary policy measures
  39. 39. Weave it all together with a Corporate Consultative Group (CCG) membership. Emily Neagle Manager, Corporate Consultative Group, Corporate Relations and Communications
  40. 40. Corporate Consultative Group (CCG) Benefits ✓ Guided access to cutting-edge research and data tools ✓ Focused support and advice from world-renowned experts ✓ Member-only monthly newsletter and event invitations ✓ Opportunities to contribute to research ✓ Admission to MindShare, an annual member-only conference
  41. 41. Current CCG Members YOU’LL LOOK GOOD HERE. Not pictured: Shell logo
  42. 42. Discussion MODERATOR Liz Cook Vice President for Institutional Strategy and Development Eliot Metzger Director, Sustainable Business and Innovation Cynthia Cummis Director of Private Sector Climate Mitigation Paul Reig Director, Aqueduct and Corporate Engagement Alex Perera Deputy Director, Energy Emily Neagle Manager, Corporate Consultative Group, Corporate Relations and Communications
  43. 43. Further Reading • Apparel and Footwear Sector Science-Based Targets Guidance • How Fashion Companies Can Collaborate to Tackle Their Biggest Source of Carbon Pollution • By the Numbers: The Economic, Social and Environmental Impacts of “Fast Fashion” • The Apparel Industry’s Environmental Impact in 6 Graphics • Water-Energy Nexus: Business Risks and Rewards • Vietnam: An Up-and-Coming Clean Energy Leader? • 5 Things Companies Can Do to Grow in a Water-Stressed World • Thirsty for Change? 4 Ways to Improve Corporate Water Targets
  44. 44. Thank You! Get in touch: Emily Neagle, Manager, Corporate Consultative Group, Corporate Relations and Communications Emily.Neagle@wri.org Join our Sustainable Business mailing list: https://www.wri.org/our-work/topics/business/sign-wri-business- center-news-and-updates

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