Workforce Development – what next?                                       Presented by Wendy Perry,                        ...
Outline  • Why?  • What? Definitions  • How? 5 step model  • What next?  - Case studies and examples  - Common workforce d...
Why? = Business case  • Significant employer or small employer?  • Dynamic and complex economic, legislative and      cont...
What is workforce planning?Workforce planning relates to analysing workforceprofile data and trends; forecasting demand;an...
What is workforce development?Workforce development bridges the gap betweenthe current workforce and the desired workforce...
WORKFORCE PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT MODEL                     STEP 1: CONTEXT & ENVIRONMENT                   •Why?          ...
What next?  • Workforce plan is an ‘essential’  • Agriculture – implementing growth strategy, regional    workforce, threa...
Threat or opportunity?  •   The Mining and Construction industries predominantly employ      machinery operators, drivers,...
JOB SPECIFIC SKILLS                                  Service                                  Customer                    ...
Balanced Scorecard                     10
Farm to Plate via the NBN                            11
Sarah and Anthony Crabb –Small Business Owners                            12
Development Options                             • Idea Mapping/Mind  •   Action Learning                                 M...
Common Workforce DevelopmentGaps and Strategies • Critical job roles and workforce participation • Ageing particularly out...
Workforce Measurement is the key Workforce Capability x Capacity + Contribution =     Workforce Productivity and Engagemen...
Links and info • YOUR ACTION PLAN • Develop a Workforce Plan in 5 easy steps • Workforce Plan Tools – Workforce Architect ...
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Workforce development what next v0.1 wp 17.9.12

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Keynote Address at the Agrifood Skills Australia National Conference on Thursday September 20th, four Points Sheraton, Darling Harbour, Sydney

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  • Leading workforce development and planning solutions highlight that national and state/territory policy directions are moving from VET into workforce development.  They demonstrate what employers, enterprises, industry sectors and regions want, with case studies and examples. The objectives of this session are to: build participants’ understanding of workforce development and planning, underpinning theories and a simple 5 step model to use with clients; link policy with practice and market driven services, where RTOs lead with workforce planning and development for themselves, and as a basis for funding proposals and submissions; and show the breadth of organisations interested in workforce development and planning services and what they want assistance with. Participants will gain an insight into leading edge workforce development and planning practices plus emerging business trends and impacts, including the roll out of the NBN; identifying industry sectors to watch for increasing demand; and gaining hints on how to position themselves (as individuals and service providers) in this market.
  • Move from VET to Workforce Development Before you ask What Next you need to ask Why?
  • Why undertake workforce planning? Refer to Strategic, Business and/or HR plan
  • The right people in the right places with the right skills doing the right jobs
  • Workforce development strategies to close the gaps identified may include: Attraction, Capabilities, Capacity, Change Management, Communication, Competency Frameworks, Leadership Development, Knowledge Management, Learning and Development, Mission Critical Job roles, Organisational Development/Learning, Professional Development, Recruitment, Retention, Reward and Recognition, Skills, Staff Development, Succession Planning, Team Development, Training and Development, Transition, Values and Behaviours, Work Life Balance.
  • How?
  • Mining and Resources Growth Growth in mining is expected to be 4.9% per annum over the next 5 years. Replacement in the industry is expected to be around 10% for the same period. The majority of increased activity will be in the Eyre Peninsula. It is estimated that between 10 – 20% of the positions will be available to people without experience (however, RESA notes there is not shortage of inexperience applicants for semi-skilled roles, the issues are with shortages of experienced, skilled applicants) Source Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Eyre and Northern region 5.1% of the population is unemployed There were 117,427 people employed in the Eyre and Northern region in Dec 2011 – a 2.3% increase from the previous year. Of those employed 12.9% are trades people, 5.7% Operator Drivers and 16.5% Labourers. Strategies to balance workforce age distribution – strategies to recruit and attract employees under 30 years Addressing the gender diversity - targeting more women into the industry Broaden retention strategies for all workforce, but in particular 25 – 44 age group Grain Ops 60+ groups – Employee intentions, phased retirement, knowledge management and succession planning Validate Work Life Balance data, obtain feedback re policies, realities and strategies - Promotion of lifestyle opportunities as point of difference Employer Branding - Promotion of attractiveness of careers in the agriculture sector (especially critical with change of name) Utilise local unemployed/underemployed Upskilling and retraining - Leadership courses for managers to retain staff. Developing close relationships with external parties, particularly Regional Boards, partnering with the Workforce Development and Migration Programs Turnover check and analysis of exit data to help inform strategies Next steps: Validate data and trends with each regional Business Centre Structured workshops with key stakeholders- current state and future state, business strategy, roles, people, turnover, trends, current losses to mining/construction sector, likely losses, critical roles, career paths, current future supply issues, strategies to address gaps/issues Analysis of Harvest Casual population Consolidate all data and formalise and prioritise strategies
  • For a region – assess individuals, businesses, community against the framework – identify strengths and development needs.
  • Balanced Scorecard could be a starting point to assess the business overall (especially if an SME) and identify strengths and development needs.
  • “ We started with a YouTube channel with a market wrap on what was in season every Saturday. Previously, without the NBN, it would take hours to load using our ADSL internet connection.” Connecting consumers and farmers minus the middleman The Willunga Farmers Market is one of thousands of similar markets around the country that connect shoppers with the people who grow and produce their food. Every Saturday, Ms Billy Doecke, Assistant Manager of the market’s not-for-profit organising committee, opens the gates at dawn and makes sure everything runs to plan. According to Doecke, the markets not only provide somewhere for families to stock up on fruit and vegetables but provide a place for people to learn about their food and ask questions about its production and provenance. In theory anyway… “ Our farmers are farmers,” Doecke said. “They’re not retailers, and they’re not necessarily ‘people-people’, which can make it hard when customers want to ask a question. Sometimes people feel like they can’t ask ‘is this really organic?’ or don’t want to waste the farmer’s time. “ Equally from the farmer’s perspective, some people just want to grow their produce and sell it. They aren’t retail specialists or marketers – that’s where we step in.” “ We set up a YouTube channel, a Facebook page, a weekly email newsletter and we’re developing an app that will allow people to find out the information that they need,” Doecke said. The NBN – the best thing since organic sourdough The farmers market upgraded to an NBN fi bre connection from ADSL2 in October last year, and Doecke said it had made her work a lot more effi cient and easier to concentrate on both promotions and logistics. The committee is now looking at developing a smartphone app that will allow people to log on in the morning and check out the markets before they leave home. “ We’re also developing a virtual tour of the market. It’s in the early stages of development, but it would allow people to walk around and see who is there and where they are positioned on the day and what they’re selling. “ You’ll also be able to search for produce and see farmers’ farming practices and if they are organic or not. We could also host virtual farm tours, where shoppers could see how everything is made, or meet the cows and chickens.”
  • The National Broadband Network is already boosting the productivity of small businesses. Sarah and Anthony Crabb run a growing business called Organic and Raw, which sells a fermented health drink, Mojo Kombucha.  The drink is produced locally in Willunga where they live and sold throughout Australia. Sarah and Anthony’s business has benefitted since connecting to the National Broadband Network. “ Our business wouldn’t be the same without the NBN,” says Sarah. “Before our Internet was quite slow and there were drop outs.  Now, for a price on par with our previous service, we’re getting a faster, more reliable connection.” The Crabb’s can do more in less time, thanks to the NBN.  “Now we can manage and market our business online in a more cost-effective, competitive way,” says Anthony “It’s going to open up a whole range of opportunities for us in the future.” The Crabb’s balance their hectic work-life with raising two small children, and a more efficient business means they can devote more time to family, and community. “ It’s a good balance,” says Anthony.
  • Touch on each one… re definitions Skill ecosystem is a concept adapted from biology that refers to a self-sustaining concentration of workforce skills and knowledge in an industry or a region, for example the South Australian wine industry or the super funds management industry in Sydney. The ecosystem metaphor comes from management literature to emphasise the interdependencies between organisations, individuals and institutions that generate innovation or growth. The term 'skill ecosystem' was coined by David Finegold to describe how knowledge and skills are formed in the cluster of computer and biomedical firms in Silicon Valley, California. https://www.training.nsw.gov.au/businesses/training_options/managing_workforce/skill_ecosystem.html Mutual Gains Bargaining (MGB) is an approach to collective bargaining intended to reach win-win outcomes for the negotiating parties. Instead of the traditional adversarial ( win-lose ) approach (aka positional bargaining), the mutual gains approach is quite similar to Principled Negotiation (first described by Roger Fisher in his book Getting to YES ), where the goal is to reach a sustainable (i.e., lasting) agreement that both parties (or all parties in a multi-party negotiation) can live with and support. Mutual gains bargaining has been used successfully in such areas as labor-management relations and environmental negotiations. Problem-based learning  (PBL) is a student-centered pedagogy in which students learn about a subject in the context of complex, multifaceted, and realistic problems. Working in groups, students identify what they already know, what they need to know, and how and where to access new information that may lead to resolution of the problem. The role of the instructor is that of facilitator of learning who provides appropriate scaffolding of that process by (for example), asking probing questions, providing appropriate resources, and leading class discussions, as well as designing student assessments. PBL was pioneered in the health sciences at McMaster University in the late 1960's and subsequently it has been adopted by other medical school programs (Barrows, 1996) and also been adapted for undergraduate instruction (Boud and Feletti, 1997; Duch et al., 2001; Amador et al., 2006). The use of PBL, like other student-centered pedagogies, has been motivated by recognition of the failures of traditional instruction (Wingspread, 1994; Boyer, 1998) and the emergence of deeper understandings of how people learn (National Research Council, 2000). Unlike traditional instruction, PBL actively engages the student in constructing knowledge in their own mind by themselves, and thus addresses many of deficits of traditional classroom where knowledge is expounded by an instructor. Characteristics of PBL are: Learning is driven by challenging, open-ended, ill-defined and ill-structured problems. Students generally work in collaborative groups. Teachers take on the role as "facilitators" of learning. In PBL, students are encouraged to take responsibility for their group and organize and direct the learning process with support from a tutor or instructor. Advocates of PBL claim it can be used to enhance content knowledge while simultaneously fostering the development of communication, problem-solving, and self-directed learning skills. PBL may position students in a simulated real world working and professional context which involves policy, process, and ethical problems that will need to be understood and resolved to some outcome. By working through a combination of learning strategies to discover the nature of a problem, understanding the constraints and options to its resolution, defining the input variables, and understanding the viewpoints involved, students learn to negotiate the complex sociological nature of the problem and how competing resolutions may inform decision-making.
  • Appendix A Q. What do you think would be your organisation’s priorities or action areas? Succession planning – processes that ensure that preferred staff will stay with the organisation Check on bullying
  • The equation… Unlock latent potential
  • Workforce development what next v0.1 wp 17.9.12

    1. 1. Workforce Development – what next? Presented by Wendy Perry, Head Workforce Planner, Workforce BluePrint© Workforce BluePrint
    2. 2. Outline • Why? • What? Definitions • How? 5 step model • What next? - Case studies and examples - Common workforce development gaps and strategies • Workforce Productivity • Links and info 2
    3. 3. Why? = Business case • Significant employer or small employer? • Dynamic and complex economic, legislative and contractual environment, growth • Challenges with shift in demographics and age profile • Industry and policy directions (national, state, local) • Strategic and business plan, new project, site, facility • Problems attracting, recruiting and retaining staff • Increase workforce productivity, quality, skills shortages, workplace health and safety, risk • Example of good practice and increasing skill levels for service contracts/client expectations • Evidence based approach for capability, tenders 3 and proposals
    4. 4. What is workforce planning?Workforce planning relates to analysing workforceprofile data and trends; forecasting demand;analysing supply; and undertaking a gap analysis.Data analysis, knowledge management, scenarioplanning and Imagineering are relevantapproaches.Workforce profiling and analysisshould reflect organisational structurenow and into the future… 4
    5. 5. What is workforce development?Workforce development bridges the gap betweenthe current workforce and the desired workforce.Workforce development is underpinned bycompetency profiling, prioritisation and hot spotanalysis. 5
    6. 6. WORKFORCE PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT MODEL STEP 1: CONTEXT & ENVIRONMENT •Why? •Strategic Objectives •Internal / external environment STEP 5: REVIEW & EVALUATION STEP 2: CURRENT WORKFORCE •Outcomes of the plan PROFILE •Implementation •Demographics •Monitoring •Skills and competencies •Issues / challenges STEP 4: GAP ANALYSIS & CLOSING STRATEGIES •Areas for action STEP 3: FUTURE WORKFORCE PROFILE •Priorities •Demand vs. supply •Resources and responsibilities •Skills and competencies •Scenarios 6
    7. 7. What next? • Workforce plan is an ‘essential’ • Agriculture – implementing growth strategy, regional workforce, threat of draw into mining and resources • Regional workforce plan - Industry + Demographics + Partners + Opportunities and Skills Profile • Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) – Small Business Health Check based upon Balanced Scorecard • NBN – enabled capability framework for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises • Major projects and infrastructure plans • Workforce diversity strategies • Development options 7
    8. 8. Threat or opportunity? • The Mining and Construction industries predominantly employ machinery operators, drivers, technicians and trades. (Approx. 60% have Cert III or IV qualifications) • In the year to Feb 2012, 93.9 per cent of the mining industry was employed full-time, compared to 66.7 per cent of the South Australian workforce. • The largest percentage of people employed in the mining and construction industries are aged between 25 – 44 years (with 35 – 44 years having the most frequency, suggesting the sector prefers to employ experience) Labour Demand in SA: • Jobs from economic growth = 69,000 new jobs between 2010 – 2015 • Replacement demand 94,000 net openings between 2010 – 2015 • Total job openings 163,000 between 2010- 2015 8
    9. 9. JOB SPECIFIC SKILLS Service Customer Office Business Services Business Ownership and Management Professionalism Training /WFBP – V1 24th January 2011 Assessment Public Sector and Safety Local Government Education and Training Financial Health Community Services Government Administration Food Accommodation Handling Asset Maintenance Agrifood Food Processing Wine Cleaning/ Housekeeping Literacy Agriculture (grain, sheep, wool) Forestry and Fishing Numeracy/ Conservation and Land Management Personal Services Regional Skills Profile Cookery Hospitality Events FOUNDATION SKILLS Hospitality people Tourism TRANSFERABLE SKILLS Dealing with Engineering Events Local Mining knowledge Retail Services Sales Retail/ OH&S Transport and Logistics Licences/ Compliance Construction Technology © Workforce BluePrint 2011
    10. 10. Balanced Scorecard 10
    11. 11. Farm to Plate via the NBN 11
    12. 12. Sarah and Anthony Crabb –Small Business Owners 12
    13. 13. Development Options • Idea Mapping/Mind • Action Learning Mapping • Action/Applied Research • K-cafes • Appreciative Inquiry • Knowledge Management • Buddying and work shadowing • Mutual gains bargaining • Coaching and mentoring • Networks • Communities of • Problem-based Practice (CoP) Learning • Competency • Project-based Learning Mapping • Scenario Planning • Creative Idea • Skills Recognition Generation • Speed Thinking • Ecosystem • Strategy Formulation 13 • Fun Factor • Work-based Learning
    14. 14. Common Workforce DevelopmentGaps and Strategies • Critical job roles and workforce participation • Ageing particularly outside workforce + WHS • Retention, succession planning, knowledge management, communication, career paths • Training needs analysis, learning and development plans, leadership development • Work Life Balance – packaging benefits of flexible working arrangements, phased retirement • Employer of Choice, reward and recognition • Barriers – not feeling valued and respected, attract a higher salary elsewhere, internal politics • Check on excessive hours, stress management • Competency or Capability Framework? 14 • Under or over supply for specific job roles
    15. 15. Workforce Measurement is the key Workforce Capability x Capacity + Contribution = Workforce Productivity and Engagement 15
    16. 16. Links and info • YOUR ACTION PLAN • Develop a Workforce Plan in 5 easy steps • Workforce Plan Tools – Workforce Architect partner package, training version available • wendy@workforceblueprint.com.au for a basic workforce plan template in word • @WorkforcePlan on Twitter • Workforce Planning Tools on Facebook • Workforce Planning Tools LinkedIn group • NBN Enabled Capability Development Network 16 • Australian VET Leaders LinkedIn group

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