SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 29
Download to read offline
WOLFF OLINS
ON CULTURE




              Page 1
AMBITIOUS
FOR CLIENTS
OPTIMISTIC
FOR THE WORLD
WE SPECIALIZE IN CAPTURING THE
PUBLIC IMAGINATION, CREATING AND
TRANSFORMING SOME OF THE WORLD’S
MOST DISTINCTIVE MUSEUM, CULTURAL
AND DESTINATION BRANDS.
BEYOND MARKETING, BEYOND IDENTITY WE
HELP INSTITUTIONS IDENTIFY AND THEN
DRIVE A CLEAR SENSE OF PURPOSE
THROUGH EVERYTHING THAT THEY DO.
OUR PROPOSITION IS ARTICULATED
AROUND ONE PRINCIPLE:
IN A WORLD WHERE WHAT YOU DO IS
MORE IMPORTANT THAN WHAT YOU SAY,
WE AIM TO CREATE BETTER REALITIES,
NOT JUST A NICER IMAGE.




                                     © Wolff Olins
                                           Page 4
SOME OF THE WAYS IN WHICH WE’VE HELPED OUR CLIENTS




Brand idea-inspired                                                                                                            Since launching the new
85 new “Imagination                                                                                                            brand in 2007, NYC tourism
Breakthroughs,” creating        In the first four months after the launch, the museum                                          has increased by 5% and
$25 billion in additional       attracted a 600% surge in visitors and 400% boom in                                            tourism spending by
revenues.                       new members.                                                                                   13.31%.
                                                                                                                                                               Every Unilever business,
                                                                                                                                                               from China to Argentina,
                                                                                                                                                               embraced the brand idea of
                                                                                                                                                               adding vitality to life. The
                                                                                                                                                               idea continues to be used
                                                                                                                                                               to determine which
                                                                                                                                                               businesses to invest in,
                                                                                                 Helping Target deliver more                                   which to exit from, and
                                                                                                 Targetness through                                            where to innovate (almost
                                                                                                 a simpler architecture                                        €1 billion a year is spent on
                                                                                                 and new product brands.                                       vitality-driven innovation).
                                                                                                                                                               The new vitality-inspired
                                Created new business offer                                                                                                     Knorr Vie drink has sold
                                that helped Mercedes                                                                                                           over 60 million bottles.
                                extend its brand beyond                                                                                                        By June 2008 Unilever was
                                automotive and into                                                                                                            achieving an underlying
                                services.                                                                                                                      sales growth close to 8%.


From the day it opened,
London’s Tate Modern was                                       In its first five years, Orange
a huge success, attracting                                     attracted a huge and                                            Within the UK, brand
double its target visitor                                      unusually loyal customer                                        recognition has already
numbers and becoming the                                       base of 7 million people.                                       reached 85% and globally,
most popular art gallery in                                    Year after year, Orange                                         recognition is over 50%.
the world. After a year,                                       scored highest of the                                           Sponsorship exceeded
Tate’s overall annual visitor                                  mobile networks on                                              expectations with partners
numbers had risen 87% to                                       customer satisfaction, and        Created a new business        spending more than €400
7.5 million. As the wrote in                                   lowest (less than 15%) on         model and raised $100         million in the first year and
May 2005, Tate “has                                            churn. By the time France         million to combat AIDS in     the 2012 Olympic games          Created a new online social
changed the way that            Sony Ericsson increased its    Telecom bought the                Africa, Inspi(RED) is the     are setting records for         commerce experience to
Britain sees art, and the       income by 139% to €362         business, it was worth an         biggest-selling t-shirt in    generating more money           transform the UK’s largest
way the world sees Britain.”    million.                       astonishing €25 billion.          Gap history.                  than any previous games.        home shopping retailer.
SOME OF OUR CLIENTS




                      Page 6
NEW MUSEUM:
NEW ART ENERGY
NEW FOR A NEW MUSEUM
The New Museum of Contemporary Art is New York City’s only
museum dedicated exclusively to showcasing contemporary art.
It’s an adventurous, progressive institution with an internationally
renowned program.

In a city over-saturated with cultural institutions, we faced an
exciting challenge: to create a brand that would drive the museum’s
vision and ambition to become a world player in contemporary art
and a first-choice 21st century cultural destination.

ACTION
Based on the idea of “New Art and New Ideas,” our first step was to
simplify the name to loosen up the museum’s institutional feel. More
importantly, this broadened their scope from the narrow definitions
of an art museum to becoming recognized as a cultural hub.

 In an exciting collaboration with the museum, we created a visual
expression that features a spectrum of color and language, and a logo
that literally moves and flexes to welcome new artists and audiences,
and announce new art and the new museum. The mantra “open,
fearless and alive” quickly became an invaluable tool for internal
decision-making.

IMPACT
The award-winning identity system captured the immediate
attention, hearts and minds of onlookers and museum lovers. In the
first four months after the launch, the museum attracted a 600%
surge in visitors and 400% boom in new members. The New Museum
– the place and the brand – continues to self-renew, opening the
doors to future creative collaborations and inviting in new art and
new ideas.




© Wolff Olins
Page 8
TATE:
DEMOCRATIZING ART
AMBITION
In the 1990s, the Tate Gallery at Millbank had opened new sites
in Liverpool and St. Ives and formed a breathtaking new ambition:
to create a huge new modern art gallery at Bankside power station
in London. Tate wanted to make all four sites into something new:
not traditional institutions, but exciting destinations.

ACTION
With help from Wolff Olins, Tate reinvented the idea of a gallery
from a single, institutional museum, with a single, institutional view,
to a branded collection of experiences, sharing an attitude but
offering many different ways of seeing. The new Tate would become
a part of everyday national life, democratizing without dumbing
down. Wolff Olins created the Tate brand under the idea “look again,
think again”: both an invitation and a challenge to visitors. Instead of
the confusing “Millbank” and “Bankside,” we named the London sites
Tate Britain and Tate Modern to signal what kind of art people would
find inside. We designed a range of logos that move in and out of
focus, suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate –always changing but
always recognizable. And we shaped Tate’s visual style, influencing
its posters, website, publications and shops. Seven years after the
initial launch, we helped Tate refresh its vision for
the decade ahead.

IMPACT
From the day it opened, Tate Modern was a huge success, attracting
double its target visitor numbers, and becoming the most popular
modern art gallery in the world. After a year, Tate’s overall annual
visitor numbers had risen 87% to 7.5 million. As the wrote in May
2005, Tate “has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way
the world sees Britain.”




© Wolff Olins
Page 10
FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF
SAN FRANCISCO (FAMSF):
CONNECTING PEOPLE
TO ART
AMBITION
The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF) is the San
Francisco organization that manages its two public museums,
the MH de Young Memorial Museum and the Palace of the Legion
of Honor. The de Young museum was a major site for significant art
exhibitions on the west coast of the United States until it was
severely damaged by an earthquake in 1989. This led to the design
of a new museum by architects Herzog & de Meuron. In the spring
of 2001, Wolff Olins was approached about developing a brand for
the museum, due to open in 2005.

ACTION
After considering the initial request, Wolff Olins realized that it would
be equally important to clearly identify and articulate the brands for
the Palace of the Legion of Honor and the Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco. We concluded that the core mission of the Fine Arts
Museums of San Francisco is to represent the city’s world art
collection and to reach out to the widest possible range of people
to experience it. Put simply: FAMSF exists to connect people to art.
To convey a less intimidating image, Wolff Olins suggested that the
museums simplify their names to “de Young” and “Legion of Honor.”

IMPACT
The result of the Wolff Olins program is a clear understanding of
what each of the three entities, FAMSF, the de Young and the Legion
of Honor stand for and how they are linked. Wolff Olins has provided
clear and evocative brands for the two museums, which encourage
participation, understanding and enthusiasm. Wolff Olins were
engaged in implementing the brand throughout the FAMSF
community, and discussing further ways to bring the brand to life
in these 21st century museums.


© Wolff Olins
Page 12
V&A: 2003 EUROPEAN
MUSEUM OF THE YEAR
AMBITION
The V&A’s strengths are the diversity and breadth of its permanent
collections, the world-class expertise of its curators and conservators
and its record-breaking programme of temporary exhibitions. Yet the
museum’s very size and diversity have resulted in organisational
fragmentation. Curatorial expertise was seen as ‘deep but narrow’,
making the Museum appear introverted. Wolff Olins was asked to
provide the fragmented ‘family’ of V&A museums with a new,
overarching ‘parent’ brand.

ACTION
Wolff Olins’ first task was to identify some values that would address
these weaknesses. To counteract the sense that the V&A’s people
 are more concerned with what they’ve got rather than what they can
give, the first value Wolff Olins identified was a generosity of spirit.
It would make the objects accessible, sharing ideas and knowledge,
internally as well as externally, and making visitors feel welcome.
As these values became integrated into the life of the Museum through
different initiatives, these values gradually became the drivers for
change in the culture of the V &A, which we called the CulturePlan.
The next element of CulturePlan was to clarify the relationships
between the different parts of the Museum. We provided a Corporate
or ‘Parent’ V&A world brand – one that over-arches all three museums.

IMPACT
The brand has continued to influence every aspect of the Museum’s
activities - catering, development, retail, and design. In 2003 the V&A
was announced as winner of the European Museum of the Year and
visitor numbers have increased by 113% since 2001.




© Wolff Olins
SCHAULAGER:
NOT ANOTHER MUSEUM
AMBITION
Schaulager is the ground breaking building by Herzog de Meuron,
home of the Emanuel Hoffmann collection in storage, based near
Basel. The idea to build Schaulager arose from a basic question:
what is the best way to store, maintain and use art when it is not
in display at a gallery? From the outset, Schaulager challenged
convention, and this spirit was to become an important part of the
brand itself. The brand needed to place Schaulager at the forefront
of thinking around contemporary art. Rather than an art showcase,
this was to be more of an art lab: serious, creative and active.
ACTION
By working closely with the curator, the benefactor and the
architects, Wolff Olins began to explore the ambition behind
Schaulager and find a way to express this. Wolff Olins brought all of
this together under the idea Art Works – a concept that immediately
focuses on the activity that happens around art. Art Works is about
thinking and doing: the spirit to explore the boundaries of
contemporary art. In turn, the visual style had to find a way of
communicating that was challenging and unique to Schaulager.
This wasn’t about creating a logo but rather a system that could
bring the idea of Art Works to life.
IMPACT
Schaulager opened in May 2003. The brand has helped define
its public face and can be seen across all its communications –
from advertising to web presence to publications. Perhaps more
importantly, however, the development of the brand helped to
crystallise Schaulager’s own understanding of what it was seeking
to do. Art Works is a belief that art should be always active, always
‘on’. It has placed Schaulager confidently on the world stage and is
as unique as Schaulager is itself.




© Wolff Olins
Page 15
SOUTHBANK CENTRE:
DESTINATION
AMBITION
Southbank Centre was built in 1951 to house the Festival of Britain,
and has a long tradition of connecting arts, in sometimes obscure
forms, to people. By 2007, however, it was fragmented, with great
expertise within each of its four venues—Royal Festival Hall, Purcell
Room, Queen Elizabeth Hall and Hayward Gallery—but little to
celebrate the greater whole. Its ambition was to unite these venues
under a new purpose.

ACTION
Wolff Olins helped create a new idea for the organization. “Arts new
chemistry” encapsulates the mission to create new types of
relationships across art forms, and new types of relationship—less
static, less one way—with audiences. It means a new kind of venue,
in which particular arts are not confined to particular buildings, nor
performances to a stage or audiences to seats. Instead the whole site
is fluid and ever-changing. Hence our visual identity, born from mixing
pure singular elements to create an ever new series of outcomes.

IMPACT
In partnership with the organization’s new artistic vision, the new
brand is having a transformative effect. Southbank Centre is now
the instigator and producer of events, not just the receiving house.
Visitors have a more integrated experience, which leads them across
the site and encourages return visits. Southbank Centre is becoming a
destination—a regular haunt for Londoners and an even more
desirable partner for performers and artists from all over the world.




© Wolff Olins
Page 17
2012
AMBITION
London’s bid for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games was like no
other. It promised to inspire the youth of the world. To engage, involve
and enthuse—to change lives. It promised to put the Olympic and
Paralympic Games at the heart of contemporary life. To achieve this,
London’s Organizing Committee needed a powerful brand, one that
could inspire and engage with a global audience of four billion
people. A brand that could make the Olympic and Paralympic Games
more relevant, accessible and inspiring than ever.

ACTION
We worked with London’s Organizing Committee to define a clear
ambition for London 2012. These Games were to be everyone’s. They
would call on people to challenge themselves—to try new things, to
go further, to discover new abilities. The brand we created supports
this ambition. The emblem is 2012, an instantly recognizable symbol
and a universal form—one already closely associated with the
Games in London. It is unconventionally bold, deliberately spirited
and unexpectedly dissonant, echoing London’s qualities of a modern,
edgy city. Containing neither sporting images nor pictures of London
landmarks, the emblem shows that the Games is more than London,
more than sport. It is for everyone, regardless of age, culture and
language. It is designed to be populated, to contain infills and
images, so it is recognizable enough for everyone to feel and be part
of London 2012.

IMPACT
The ambition—everyone’s—is already shaping London 2012. For the
first time the Olympic and Paralympic Games will share the same
brand, using their own variant of the emblem. And in another first,
the Cultural Olympiad will be able to share the brand. New
technology is being put in place to get everyone closer to the action
and more deeply involved. Digital media will be used to create a
Games in which everyone can play a part wherever they are. The
brand we created will shape the experience of 2012. It will take the
Games beyond sport, creating wider interest and even greater
inspiration. It will create a Games for everyone.



© Wolff Olins
UNILEVER:
ADDING VITALITY
TO BUSINESS
AMBITION
Unilever is big. 150 million times a day, in 150 countries, people
choose to make Unilever brands part of their lives. But in the
consumer goods industry, growth is hard. Unilever decided that
it was too diffuse, with too many brands and with no unifying driver
of growth. Unilever wanted to become a single-minded, idea-led
growth business.

ACTION
Wolff Olins helped Unilever change, from an invisible owner of
brands to a much more visible business, leading its brands through
a single idea: “adding vitality to life.” We created a visual identity
that expresses “Vitality” and that is starting to appear on every
Unilever product. Under this banner, we also worked on dozens of
projects to put vitality at the heart of the organization – from
designing workplaces to transforming the recruitment process t
o training employees how to pass on the stories that underlie the idea.
And we’ve helped Unilever invent new products and projects that
deliver vitality.

IMPACT
Since implementation of the Vitality idea, Unilever’s operating profit
has increased at an average rate of more than 15% per year. Every
Unilever business, from China to Argentina, has embraced the Vitality
idea. Unilever is using the idea to determine which businesses to
invest in, which to exit from, and where to innovate, and now spends
almost €1 billion a year on vitality-driven innovation. Results are
coming through: the new vitality-inspired Knorr Vie drink, for example,
has sold 60 million bottles since launch, driving Unilever’s profits to
new heights.




© Wolff Olins
GE:
MOST ADMIRED
TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY POWERHOUSE
With 300,000 people in 174 countries, and 3,500 businesses, all
number one or two in their markets, GE defined the 20th century
corporation. With the transfer of leadership from Jack Welch to
Jeff Immelt, GE was poised for transformation. From manufacturing
to technology and service. From US-centric to an emphasis on Asia
and Europe. From a business driven by organizational silos to greater
focus on the customer. From an under-leveraged atomized old-world
brand to a 21st century powerhouse of innovation and impact.

MARKET-FACING BRAND
Wolff Olins worked with GE to create a market-facing brand
architecture that hugely simplified its portfolio of businesses into
solution platforms for customers. This allowed GE to enhance
existing relationships with businesses and develop new relationships
with consumers. We created a modern identity that liberates and
celebrates the GE monogram, and that’s flexible enough to work with
everything from jet engines to light bulbs. We traveled the world to
excite GE leaders about the brand idea ‘Imagination at work’, and
defined with them how the brand should be made real throughout
the business.

$25 BILLION NEW REVENUES
GE was named “most admired company” for two years running
by Fortune magazine. It’s now pitching to countries and governments,
using its new ability to bring unified solutions to its customers. $25
billion in additional revenues have been added by 85 “Imagination
breakthroughs,” inspired by the brand idea. GE is now the fourth
biggest brand in the world, valued in 2008 at $53 billion.




© Wolff Olins
MERCEDES-BENZ:
10 MONTHS, 3 NEW
BUSINESSES
GROWING A GLOBAL ICON
In 2007, Daimler set up a team of senior executives to develop new
growth initiatives beyond the world of cars. Having identified the
brand as one of the most important assets to leverage, the Business
Innovation team approached Wolff Olins to help develop appropriate
businesses to generated new and profitable growth without putting
one of the world’s most iconic brands at risk.

FROM IDEAS TO REALITY
Wolff Olins developed a brand-led innovation framework that ensures
that each venture protects the Mercedes-Benz brand, leverages what
is tangibly special about it (e.g., German engineering), gives the brand
new relevance in the world (attracting younger customers and
building new sustainability credentials) and makes money (with a
return on sales of 20% or more). Working with Daimler’s Business
Innovation team and the leaders of the business in UK, US, China and
Japan, we developed ten new businesses to pilot. In January 2009
(ten months after the commencement of the project), Daimler
launched solutions for family mobility at the Mercedes-Benz brand
centre in Surrey UK.

A PLATFORM FOR GROWTH
Kinderclass has already led to a significant increase in the sale of
child safety accessories and continues to attract younger families to
the Mercedes-Benz brand. Later in 2009, a new high profile venture
and an exclusive travel service will be launched in the UK and China,
respectively. Wolff Olins continues to provide advice and creative
assistance as other products and services are being developed and
launched around the world.




© Wolff Olins                                                              © Wolff Olins
                                                                               Page 21
BEELINE:
RUSSIA’S TOP BRAND
COMPETE FOR LOYALTY
In 2005, the Russian mobile communications market was
approaching saturation, especially in Moscow. The challenge
was to turn Beeline into a brand that could stand apart and compete
effectively in this context. A more clearly differentiated position
was required, one that focused on creating long-term customer
relationships and deeper emotional bonds to drive real loyalty.
This, combined with a strong identity, has been key to setting a new
standard in the Russian market.

BRIGHT SIDE
With Beeline and BBDO, Wolff Olins developed a new positioning,
identity, communications style, image libraries and campaign for
launch. We then rolled out the brand across all communications,
packaging, retail, web and HQ interiors, alongside a number of
internal brand-building initiatives. The rebrand was a huge success
and at the end of 2005 revenue was up by 40%, market capitalization
by 28% and ARPU by 7%. We continue to work with Beeline as it grows
into new regions and product areas.

MOST VALUABLE
Since relaunching the brand, Beeline has been independently ranked
the most valuable brand in Russia for three consecutive years,
according to Interbrand Zintzmeyer & Lux in Business Week. It has
become the benchmark for all recent brand launches and the one to
beat in mobile telephony.




© Wolff Olins
(RED)
EMBRACING
CONSCIOUS
COMMERCE
AMBITION
(RED)’s ambition was to harness the power of the world’s greatest
companies to help eliminate AIDS in Africa. To do this, it created both
a new business model and a new brand model to achieve three goals:
deliver a source of sustainable income for the Global Fund, provide
consumers with a choice that makes giving effortless and last but not
least, generate profits and a sense of purpose for partner companies.

ACTION
The first challenge was to get the all-important founding partners
on board. So we helped Bobby Shriver and Bono paint a vision of what
(RED) could be. This vision of the future provoked Amex, Converse,
Emporio Armani and Gap to take the plunge.

We built the brand around the idea that (RED) inspires, connects
and gives consumers power, with a unique brand architecture that
unites participating businesses by literally embracing their logos
to the power (RED). Many partners have gone the extra mile and
manufactured products or packaging in African countries, generating
jobs and opportunities for local people.

IMPACT
Within the first five weeks of the US launch, the (RED) brand
registered 30% unaided awareness. Over 1.35 million people watched
a YouTube video showing the impact and there are over 850,000 (RED)
friends on MySpace. In its first two years, (RED) partners delivered
$108 million to the Global Fund, more than most countries donated
in the same period. This is enough money to give 650,000 people
life-saving drugs for a year.




© Wolff Olins
NYC:
THE
UNBRANDABLE
CITY
AMBITION
There’s only one New York City. But within that one city are five
boroughs, approximately 191 neighborhoods, nearly a million
buildings and over 8.2 million people. Each individual has their own
New York.

Within the mind of every single New Yorker resides a different version
of New York City. It’s a city loved in 138 different languages and
viewed through an almost infinite mix of cultures, ideologies and
ways of life. Everyone living side-by-side.

This kaleidoscopic quality is one of the greatest things about this city.
It’s the very thing we love. But it also makes it difficult to represent.
There is no one symbol, no one logo or brand that means New York
City to everyone.

ACTION
To create a brand for New York City, the challenge was not to define a
purpose, but to capture an essence. This was articulated by the idea:
“only one, but no one NYC.”

The resulting brand identity has now been embraced not just by
New York City’s official marketing, tourism and partnership
organization, NYC & Company, but across many City departments.

IMPACT
From what was once many disparate and confusing identities,
the NYC brand has become the singular strong voice for the City,
clearly articulated. Tourism revenues rose and the first international
advertising campaign has launched, bringing this rigorous brand to a
global audience.


© Wolff Olins
140 PEOPLE
21 LANGUAGES
3 OFFICES
1BUSINESS
PART OF OMNICOM


© Wolff Olins     © Wolff Olins
                      Page 27
Michael Wolff and Wally Olins set up Wolff Olins in 1965.   The 80s was the great age of corporate identity.
                                                            Wally wrote the book. We worked For 3i, Q8 and
In the 60s, we did convention-breaking design work for      Prudential. Repsol took us into Spain. And we created
big companies like boc, for government bodies like          a little banking brand in Britain called First Direct.
Camden and for the Beatles.
                                                            We started the 90s with Europe’s biggest corporate
In the 70s, we pioneered corporate identity for P&O.        identity project, BT, and then morphed into branding with
And with tough economic times in Britain, we moved into     Orange, then Heathrow Express. And we closed
France with Colr and Germany with Aral.                     the decade by opening in New York.

                                                            In the 00s, we’ve become a world business with GE, Oi,
                                                            PwC and (RED) in the Americas. Beeline, London 2012,
                                                            Macmillan, Sony Ericsson, Tate and Unilever in Europe.
                                                            And Airtel, Sony, Tokyo Metro and Wacom in Asia.




                                                                                                            © Wolff Olins
                                                                                                                Page 28
WE’D LOVE TO TALK:
  Gilles Guilbert
  Main: +1 212 505 7337
  Direct: +1 212 471 1520
  Cell: +1 917 721 9068
  gilles.guilbert@wolffolins.com
  Wolff Olins
  200 Varick Street
  10th Floor
  New York, NY 10014
  www.wolffolins.com




Page 29                            Page 29

More Related Content

What's hot

Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures
Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures
Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures
Alexander Osterwalder
 
디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표
디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표
디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표
한국디자인진흥원 공공서비스디자인PD
 

What's hot (20)

How to Use Canva Like a Pro
How to Use Canva Like a ProHow to Use Canva Like a Pro
How to Use Canva Like a Pro
 
Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures
Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures
Talk with Steve Blank at true ventures
 
해양디지털트윈v02.pdf
해양디지털트윈v02.pdf해양디지털트윈v02.pdf
해양디지털트윈v02.pdf
 
[메조미디어] 2023 디지털 마케팅 마일스톤
[메조미디어] 2023 디지털 마케팅 마일스톤[메조미디어] 2023 디지털 마케팅 마일스톤
[메조미디어] 2023 디지털 마케팅 마일스톤
 
Brand Frameworks
Brand FrameworksBrand Frameworks
Brand Frameworks
 
디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표
디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표
디자인씽킹을 통한 커뮤니티 디자인 사례 소개(한글 번역판) - 야마자키 료, 스투디오L 대표
 
Tipografia no Design Impresso - Computação Gráfica 2022
Tipografia no Design Impresso - Computação Gráfica 2022Tipografia no Design Impresso - Computação Gráfica 2022
Tipografia no Design Impresso - Computação Gráfica 2022
 
KnittComm_회사소개서.pdf
KnittComm_회사소개서.pdfKnittComm_회사소개서.pdf
KnittComm_회사소개서.pdf
 
Co mówią ludzie, których nikt nie słucha?
Co mówią ludzie, których nikt nie słucha?Co mówią ludzie, których nikt nie słucha?
Co mówią ludzie, których nikt nie słucha?
 
Fase apresentação
Fase apresentaçãoFase apresentação
Fase apresentação
 
Pimcore - Presentation
Pimcore - PresentationPimcore - Presentation
Pimcore - Presentation
 
2021 한양대_로컬브랜드_PHOTOMING_DaonMoa_최종제출.pdf
2021 한양대_로컬브랜드_PHOTOMING_DaonMoa_최종제출.pdf2021 한양대_로컬브랜드_PHOTOMING_DaonMoa_최종제출.pdf
2021 한양대_로컬브랜드_PHOTOMING_DaonMoa_최종제출.pdf
 
Samsung Mobile Brand Guideline
Samsung Mobile Brand GuidelineSamsung Mobile Brand Guideline
Samsung Mobile Brand Guideline
 
Color palette scegliere i giusti colori per il tuo brand
Color palette scegliere i giusti colori per il tuo brandColor palette scegliere i giusti colori per il tuo brand
Color palette scegliere i giusti colori per il tuo brand
 
[NAVER D2SF][TMS2019] 우아한형제들
[NAVER D2SF][TMS2019] 우아한형제들[NAVER D2SF][TMS2019] 우아한형제들
[NAVER D2SF][TMS2019] 우아한형제들
 
Brand Masterclass Week One
Brand Masterclass Week OneBrand Masterclass Week One
Brand Masterclass Week One
 
13th.Design.for.AI.Lecture.pdf
13th.Design.for.AI.Lecture.pdf13th.Design.for.AI.Lecture.pdf
13th.Design.for.AI.Lecture.pdf
 
All Type - Combinação de Cores e Fontes - Computação Gráfica 2022
All Type - Combinação de Cores e Fontes - Computação Gráfica 2022All Type - Combinação de Cores e Fontes - Computação Gráfica 2022
All Type - Combinação de Cores e Fontes - Computação Gráfica 2022
 
UX & UI Design - Differentiate through design
UX & UI Design - Differentiate through designUX & UI Design - Differentiate through design
UX & UI Design - Differentiate through design
 
The Art Of The Creative Pitch
The Art Of The Creative PitchThe Art Of The Creative Pitch
The Art Of The Creative Pitch
 

Viewers also liked

Ten learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for success
Ten learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for successTen learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for success
Ten learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for success
Wolff Olins
 
Gyro disappearing sales process
Gyro disappearing sales processGyro disappearing sales process
Gyro disappearing sales process
scottgillum
 

Viewers also liked (20)

Ten learnings on thinking small for big impact
Ten learnings on thinking small for big impact Ten learnings on thinking small for big impact
Ten learnings on thinking small for big impact
 
Then, Now, Next
Then, Now, NextThen, Now, Next
Then, Now, Next
 
WO ON RETAIL
WO ON RETAILWO ON RETAIL
WO ON RETAIL
 
Ten learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for success
Ten learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for successTen learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for success
Ten learnings from Wolff Olins on setting up a marketing department for success
 
Tate Case Study
Tate Case StudyTate Case Study
Tate Case Study
 
What's in a name? Eight best practices for creating a successful name brand
What's in a name? Eight best practices for creating a successful name brandWhat's in a name? Eight best practices for creating a successful name brand
What's in a name? Eight best practices for creating a successful name brand
 
Naming Brands
Naming BrandsNaming Brands
Naming Brands
 
User Experience Expertise for Business Applications
User Experience Expertise for Business ApplicationsUser Experience Expertise for Business Applications
User Experience Expertise for Business Applications
 
Best Ad Banners Ever - Arunesh Chand Mankotia
Best Ad Banners Ever  - Arunesh Chand MankotiaBest Ad Banners Ever  - Arunesh Chand Mankotia
Best Ad Banners Ever - Arunesh Chand Mankotia
 
Learn Brand Design To Rebrand Your Business Without Losing Customers
Learn Brand Design To Rebrand  Your Business Without Losing  CustomersLearn Brand Design To Rebrand  Your Business Without Losing  Customers
Learn Brand Design To Rebrand Your Business Without Losing Customers
 
Nordstrom vs. Bloomingdale's
Nordstrom vs. Bloomingdale'sNordstrom vs. Bloomingdale's
Nordstrom vs. Bloomingdale's
 
Design audit
Design auditDesign audit
Design audit
 
Beautiful Web Typography: 7 tips on de-sucking the web
Beautiful Web Typography: 7 tips on de-sucking the webBeautiful Web Typography: 7 tips on de-sucking the web
Beautiful Web Typography: 7 tips on de-sucking the web
 
Better user stories by Matteo Cavucci
Better user stories by Matteo CavucciBetter user stories by Matteo Cavucci
Better user stories by Matteo Cavucci
 
Design for User Stories
Design for User StoriesDesign for User Stories
Design for User Stories
 
Storytelling in Practice: Brand Narratives and Archetypes
Storytelling in Practice: Brand Narratives and ArchetypesStorytelling in Practice: Brand Narratives and Archetypes
Storytelling in Practice: Brand Narratives and Archetypes
 
M.A.C Design Audit
M.A.C Design AuditM.A.C Design Audit
M.A.C Design Audit
 
Landor slideshare
Landor slideshareLandor slideshare
Landor slideshare
 
Gyro disappearing sales process
Gyro disappearing sales processGyro disappearing sales process
Gyro disappearing sales process
 
Web Typography, A Long Dark
Web Typography, A Long Dark Web Typography, A Long Dark
Web Typography, A Long Dark
 

Similar to WOLFF OLINS ON CULTURE

WOLFF OLINS 2010
WOLFF OLINS 2010WOLFF OLINS 2010
WOLFF OLINS 2010
Wolff Olins
 
Black sheep fund introduction
Black sheep fund introductionBlack sheep fund introduction
Black sheep fund introduction
Mel Exon
 
Purple Asia's Branding and Design Credentials
Purple Asia's Branding and Design CredentialsPurple Asia's Branding and Design Credentials
Purple Asia's Branding and Design Credentials
Matt Millard
 
morgan stanley Annual Reports 2006
morgan stanley  Annual Reports 2006 morgan stanley  Annual Reports 2006
morgan stanley Annual Reports 2006
finance2
 
150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle
150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle
150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle
c3ventures
 
Patrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatie
Patrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatiePatrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatie
Patrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatie
Pleisureworld1
 
Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015
Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015
Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015
Ed Will
 

Similar to WOLFF OLINS ON CULTURE (20)

WOLFF OLINS 2010
WOLFF OLINS 2010WOLFF OLINS 2010
WOLFF OLINS 2010
 
WO ON BRAND
WO ON BRANDWO ON BRAND
WO ON BRAND
 
brand scavenging
brand scavengingbrand scavenging
brand scavenging
 
MADAgency_CompanyProfile
MADAgency_CompanyProfileMADAgency_CompanyProfile
MADAgency_CompanyProfile
 
The Blink Factor
The Blink FactorThe Blink Factor
The Blink Factor
 
Black sheep fund introduction
Black sheep fund introductionBlack sheep fund introduction
Black sheep fund introduction
 
Wave Social Media Quarterly Q2 2011 (Wavemetrix) -OCT11
Wave Social Media Quarterly Q2 2011 (Wavemetrix) -OCT11Wave Social Media Quarterly Q2 2011 (Wavemetrix) -OCT11
Wave Social Media Quarterly Q2 2011 (Wavemetrix) -OCT11
 
Purple Asia's Branding and Design Credentials
Purple Asia's Branding and Design CredentialsPurple Asia's Branding and Design Credentials
Purple Asia's Branding and Design Credentials
 
morgan stanley Annual Reports 2006
morgan stanley  Annual Reports 2006 morgan stanley  Annual Reports 2006
morgan stanley Annual Reports 2006
 
IA Hrynewyz Portfolio
IA Hrynewyz PortfolioIA Hrynewyz Portfolio
IA Hrynewyz Portfolio
 
150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle
150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle
150512 Growth Partners Luxury & Lifestyle
 
Konica Minolta Corporate Profile 2012
Konica Minolta Corporate Profile 2012Konica Minolta Corporate Profile 2012
Konica Minolta Corporate Profile 2012
 
London and Campaign
London and CampaignLondon and Campaign
London and Campaign
 
IKEA Integrated Marketing Campaign | IMC 610
IKEA Integrated Marketing Campaign | IMC 610IKEA Integrated Marketing Campaign | IMC 610
IKEA Integrated Marketing Campaign | IMC 610
 
Patrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatie
Patrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatiePatrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatie
Patrick Nolsen - Whirlpool presentatie
 
The real value of social media
The real value of social mediaThe real value of social media
The real value of social media
 
Making Brands Matter
Making Brands MatterMaking Brands Matter
Making Brands Matter
 
Origami Portfolio 2009, Branding & Tactical Creativity
Origami Portfolio 2009, Branding & Tactical CreativityOrigami Portfolio 2009, Branding & Tactical Creativity
Origami Portfolio 2009, Branding & Tactical Creativity
 
Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015
Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015
Breakfast creative credentials.October 2015
 
Innovation ,creativity and invention
 Innovation ,creativity and invention Innovation ,creativity and invention
Innovation ,creativity and invention
 

More from Wolff Olins

Unilever Case Study
Unilever Case StudyUnilever Case Study
Unilever Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Tata DOCOMO Case Study
Tata DOCOMO Case StudyTata DOCOMO Case Study
Tata DOCOMO Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Southbank Centre Case Study
Southbank Centre Case StudySouthbank Centre Case Study
Southbank Centre Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Sony Ericsson Case Study
Sony Ericsson Case StudySony Ericsson Case Study
Sony Ericsson Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
New Museum Case Study
New Museum Case StudyNew Museum Case Study
New Museum Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Mercedes-Benz Case Study
Mercedes-Benz Case StudyMercedes-Benz Case Study
Mercedes-Benz Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Macmillan Cancer Support Case Study
Macmillan Cancer Support Case StudyMacmillan Cancer Support Case Study
Macmillan Cancer Support Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
London 2012 Case Study
London 2012 Case StudyLondon 2012 Case Study
London 2012 Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Liverpool ONE Case Study
Liverpool ONE Case StudyLiverpool ONE Case Study
Liverpool ONE Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Littlewoods Case Study
Littlewoods Case StudyLittlewoods Case Study
Littlewoods Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Ilori Case Study
Ilori Case StudyIlori Case Study
Ilori Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Heathrow Express Case Study
Heathrow Express Case StudyHeathrow Express Case Study
Heathrow Express Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Frito-Lay TrueNorth Case Study
Frito-Lay TrueNorth Case StudyFrito-Lay TrueNorth Case Study
Frito-Lay TrueNorth Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
First Direct Case Study
First Direct Case StudyFirst Direct Case Study
First Direct Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
Carter's Case Study
Carter's Case StudyCarter's Case Study
Carter's Case Study
Wolff Olins
 
British Telecom Case Study
British Telecom Case StudyBritish Telecom Case Study
British Telecom Case Study
Wolff Olins
 

More from Wolff Olins (20)

Very Case Study
Very Case StudyVery Case Study
Very Case Study
 
V&A Case Study
V&A Case StudyV&A Case Study
V&A Case Study
 
Unilever Case Study
Unilever Case StudyUnilever Case Study
Unilever Case Study
 
Tata DOCOMO Case Study
Tata DOCOMO Case StudyTata DOCOMO Case Study
Tata DOCOMO Case Study
 
Southbank Centre Case Study
Southbank Centre Case StudySouthbank Centre Case Study
Southbank Centre Case Study
 
Sony Ericsson Case Study
Sony Ericsson Case StudySony Ericsson Case Study
Sony Ericsson Case Study
 
NYC Case Study
NYC Case StudyNYC Case Study
NYC Case Study
 
New Museum Case Study
New Museum Case StudyNew Museum Case Study
New Museum Case Study
 
Mercedes-Benz Case Study
Mercedes-Benz Case StudyMercedes-Benz Case Study
Mercedes-Benz Case Study
 
Macmillan Cancer Support Case Study
Macmillan Cancer Support Case StudyMacmillan Cancer Support Case Study
Macmillan Cancer Support Case Study
 
London 2012 Case Study
London 2012 Case StudyLondon 2012 Case Study
London 2012 Case Study
 
Liverpool ONE Case Study
Liverpool ONE Case StudyLiverpool ONE Case Study
Liverpool ONE Case Study
 
Littlewoods Case Study
Littlewoods Case StudyLittlewoods Case Study
Littlewoods Case Study
 
Ilori Case Study
Ilori Case StudyIlori Case Study
Ilori Case Study
 
Heathrow Express Case Study
Heathrow Express Case StudyHeathrow Express Case Study
Heathrow Express Case Study
 
GE Case Study
GE Case StudyGE Case Study
GE Case Study
 
Frito-Lay TrueNorth Case Study
Frito-Lay TrueNorth Case StudyFrito-Lay TrueNorth Case Study
Frito-Lay TrueNorth Case Study
 
First Direct Case Study
First Direct Case StudyFirst Direct Case Study
First Direct Case Study
 
Carter's Case Study
Carter's Case StudyCarter's Case Study
Carter's Case Study
 
British Telecom Case Study
British Telecom Case StudyBritish Telecom Case Study
British Telecom Case Study
 

WOLFF OLINS ON CULTURE

  • 3. WE SPECIALIZE IN CAPTURING THE PUBLIC IMAGINATION, CREATING AND TRANSFORMING SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST DISTINCTIVE MUSEUM, CULTURAL AND DESTINATION BRANDS. BEYOND MARKETING, BEYOND IDENTITY WE HELP INSTITUTIONS IDENTIFY AND THEN DRIVE A CLEAR SENSE OF PURPOSE THROUGH EVERYTHING THAT THEY DO.
  • 4. OUR PROPOSITION IS ARTICULATED AROUND ONE PRINCIPLE: IN A WORLD WHERE WHAT YOU DO IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN WHAT YOU SAY, WE AIM TO CREATE BETTER REALITIES, NOT JUST A NICER IMAGE. © Wolff Olins Page 4
  • 5. SOME OF THE WAYS IN WHICH WE’VE HELPED OUR CLIENTS Brand idea-inspired Since launching the new 85 new “Imagination brand in 2007, NYC tourism Breakthroughs,” creating In the first four months after the launch, the museum has increased by 5% and $25 billion in additional attracted a 600% surge in visitors and 400% boom in tourism spending by revenues. new members. 13.31%. Every Unilever business, from China to Argentina, embraced the brand idea of adding vitality to life. The idea continues to be used to determine which businesses to invest in, Helping Target deliver more which to exit from, and Targetness through where to innovate (almost a simpler architecture €1 billion a year is spent on and new product brands. vitality-driven innovation). The new vitality-inspired Created new business offer Knorr Vie drink has sold that helped Mercedes over 60 million bottles. extend its brand beyond By June 2008 Unilever was automotive and into achieving an underlying services. sales growth close to 8%. From the day it opened, London’s Tate Modern was In its first five years, Orange a huge success, attracting attracted a huge and Within the UK, brand double its target visitor unusually loyal customer recognition has already numbers and becoming the base of 7 million people. reached 85% and globally, most popular art gallery in Year after year, Orange recognition is over 50%. the world. After a year, scored highest of the Sponsorship exceeded Tate’s overall annual visitor mobile networks on expectations with partners numbers had risen 87% to customer satisfaction, and Created a new business spending more than €400 7.5 million. As the wrote in lowest (less than 15%) on model and raised $100 million in the first year and May 2005, Tate “has churn. By the time France million to combat AIDS in the 2012 Olympic games Created a new online social changed the way that Sony Ericsson increased its Telecom bought the Africa, Inspi(RED) is the are setting records for commerce experience to Britain sees art, and the income by 139% to €362 business, it was worth an biggest-selling t-shirt in generating more money transform the UK’s largest way the world sees Britain.” million. astonishing €25 billion. Gap history. than any previous games. home shopping retailer.
  • 6. SOME OF OUR CLIENTS Page 6
  • 7. NEW MUSEUM: NEW ART ENERGY NEW FOR A NEW MUSEUM The New Museum of Contemporary Art is New York City’s only museum dedicated exclusively to showcasing contemporary art. It’s an adventurous, progressive institution with an internationally renowned program. In a city over-saturated with cultural institutions, we faced an exciting challenge: to create a brand that would drive the museum’s vision and ambition to become a world player in contemporary art and a first-choice 21st century cultural destination. ACTION Based on the idea of “New Art and New Ideas,” our first step was to simplify the name to loosen up the museum’s institutional feel. More importantly, this broadened their scope from the narrow definitions of an art museum to becoming recognized as a cultural hub. In an exciting collaboration with the museum, we created a visual expression that features a spectrum of color and language, and a logo that literally moves and flexes to welcome new artists and audiences, and announce new art and the new museum. The mantra “open, fearless and alive” quickly became an invaluable tool for internal decision-making. IMPACT The award-winning identity system captured the immediate attention, hearts and minds of onlookers and museum lovers. In the first four months after the launch, the museum attracted a 600% surge in visitors and 400% boom in new members. The New Museum – the place and the brand – continues to self-renew, opening the doors to future creative collaborations and inviting in new art and new ideas. © Wolff Olins
  • 9. TATE: DEMOCRATIZING ART AMBITION In the 1990s, the Tate Gallery at Millbank had opened new sites in Liverpool and St. Ives and formed a breathtaking new ambition: to create a huge new modern art gallery at Bankside power station in London. Tate wanted to make all four sites into something new: not traditional institutions, but exciting destinations. ACTION With help from Wolff Olins, Tate reinvented the idea of a gallery from a single, institutional museum, with a single, institutional view, to a branded collection of experiences, sharing an attitude but offering many different ways of seeing. The new Tate would become a part of everyday national life, democratizing without dumbing down. Wolff Olins created the Tate brand under the idea “look again, think again”: both an invitation and a challenge to visitors. Instead of the confusing “Millbank” and “Bankside,” we named the London sites Tate Britain and Tate Modern to signal what kind of art people would find inside. We designed a range of logos that move in and out of focus, suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate –always changing but always recognizable. And we shaped Tate’s visual style, influencing its posters, website, publications and shops. Seven years after the initial launch, we helped Tate refresh its vision for the decade ahead. IMPACT From the day it opened, Tate Modern was a huge success, attracting double its target visitor numbers, and becoming the most popular modern art gallery in the world. After a year, Tate’s overall annual visitor numbers had risen 87% to 7.5 million. As the wrote in May 2005, Tate “has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way the world sees Britain.” © Wolff Olins
  • 11. FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO (FAMSF): CONNECTING PEOPLE TO ART AMBITION The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF) is the San Francisco organization that manages its two public museums, the MH de Young Memorial Museum and the Palace of the Legion of Honor. The de Young museum was a major site for significant art exhibitions on the west coast of the United States until it was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1989. This led to the design of a new museum by architects Herzog & de Meuron. In the spring of 2001, Wolff Olins was approached about developing a brand for the museum, due to open in 2005. ACTION After considering the initial request, Wolff Olins realized that it would be equally important to clearly identify and articulate the brands for the Palace of the Legion of Honor and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. We concluded that the core mission of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco is to represent the city’s world art collection and to reach out to the widest possible range of people to experience it. Put simply: FAMSF exists to connect people to art. To convey a less intimidating image, Wolff Olins suggested that the museums simplify their names to “de Young” and “Legion of Honor.” IMPACT The result of the Wolff Olins program is a clear understanding of what each of the three entities, FAMSF, the de Young and the Legion of Honor stand for and how they are linked. Wolff Olins has provided clear and evocative brands for the two museums, which encourage participation, understanding and enthusiasm. Wolff Olins were engaged in implementing the brand throughout the FAMSF community, and discussing further ways to bring the brand to life in these 21st century museums. © Wolff Olins
  • 13. V&A: 2003 EUROPEAN MUSEUM OF THE YEAR AMBITION The V&A’s strengths are the diversity and breadth of its permanent collections, the world-class expertise of its curators and conservators and its record-breaking programme of temporary exhibitions. Yet the museum’s very size and diversity have resulted in organisational fragmentation. Curatorial expertise was seen as ‘deep but narrow’, making the Museum appear introverted. Wolff Olins was asked to provide the fragmented ‘family’ of V&A museums with a new, overarching ‘parent’ brand. ACTION Wolff Olins’ first task was to identify some values that would address these weaknesses. To counteract the sense that the V&A’s people are more concerned with what they’ve got rather than what they can give, the first value Wolff Olins identified was a generosity of spirit. It would make the objects accessible, sharing ideas and knowledge, internally as well as externally, and making visitors feel welcome. As these values became integrated into the life of the Museum through different initiatives, these values gradually became the drivers for change in the culture of the V &A, which we called the CulturePlan. The next element of CulturePlan was to clarify the relationships between the different parts of the Museum. We provided a Corporate or ‘Parent’ V&A world brand – one that over-arches all three museums. IMPACT The brand has continued to influence every aspect of the Museum’s activities - catering, development, retail, and design. In 2003 the V&A was announced as winner of the European Museum of the Year and visitor numbers have increased by 113% since 2001. © Wolff Olins
  • 14. SCHAULAGER: NOT ANOTHER MUSEUM AMBITION Schaulager is the ground breaking building by Herzog de Meuron, home of the Emanuel Hoffmann collection in storage, based near Basel. The idea to build Schaulager arose from a basic question: what is the best way to store, maintain and use art when it is not in display at a gallery? From the outset, Schaulager challenged convention, and this spirit was to become an important part of the brand itself. The brand needed to place Schaulager at the forefront of thinking around contemporary art. Rather than an art showcase, this was to be more of an art lab: serious, creative and active. ACTION By working closely with the curator, the benefactor and the architects, Wolff Olins began to explore the ambition behind Schaulager and find a way to express this. Wolff Olins brought all of this together under the idea Art Works – a concept that immediately focuses on the activity that happens around art. Art Works is about thinking and doing: the spirit to explore the boundaries of contemporary art. In turn, the visual style had to find a way of communicating that was challenging and unique to Schaulager. This wasn’t about creating a logo but rather a system that could bring the idea of Art Works to life. IMPACT Schaulager opened in May 2003. The brand has helped define its public face and can be seen across all its communications – from advertising to web presence to publications. Perhaps more importantly, however, the development of the brand helped to crystallise Schaulager’s own understanding of what it was seeking to do. Art Works is a belief that art should be always active, always ‘on’. It has placed Schaulager confidently on the world stage and is as unique as Schaulager is itself. © Wolff Olins
  • 16. SOUTHBANK CENTRE: DESTINATION AMBITION Southbank Centre was built in 1951 to house the Festival of Britain, and has a long tradition of connecting arts, in sometimes obscure forms, to people. By 2007, however, it was fragmented, with great expertise within each of its four venues—Royal Festival Hall, Purcell Room, Queen Elizabeth Hall and Hayward Gallery—but little to celebrate the greater whole. Its ambition was to unite these venues under a new purpose. ACTION Wolff Olins helped create a new idea for the organization. “Arts new chemistry” encapsulates the mission to create new types of relationships across art forms, and new types of relationship—less static, less one way—with audiences. It means a new kind of venue, in which particular arts are not confined to particular buildings, nor performances to a stage or audiences to seats. Instead the whole site is fluid and ever-changing. Hence our visual identity, born from mixing pure singular elements to create an ever new series of outcomes. IMPACT In partnership with the organization’s new artistic vision, the new brand is having a transformative effect. Southbank Centre is now the instigator and producer of events, not just the receiving house. Visitors have a more integrated experience, which leads them across the site and encourages return visits. Southbank Centre is becoming a destination—a regular haunt for Londoners and an even more desirable partner for performers and artists from all over the world. © Wolff Olins
  • 18. 2012 AMBITION London’s bid for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games was like no other. It promised to inspire the youth of the world. To engage, involve and enthuse—to change lives. It promised to put the Olympic and Paralympic Games at the heart of contemporary life. To achieve this, London’s Organizing Committee needed a powerful brand, one that could inspire and engage with a global audience of four billion people. A brand that could make the Olympic and Paralympic Games more relevant, accessible and inspiring than ever. ACTION We worked with London’s Organizing Committee to define a clear ambition for London 2012. These Games were to be everyone’s. They would call on people to challenge themselves—to try new things, to go further, to discover new abilities. The brand we created supports this ambition. The emblem is 2012, an instantly recognizable symbol and a universal form—one already closely associated with the Games in London. It is unconventionally bold, deliberately spirited and unexpectedly dissonant, echoing London’s qualities of a modern, edgy city. Containing neither sporting images nor pictures of London landmarks, the emblem shows that the Games is more than London, more than sport. It is for everyone, regardless of age, culture and language. It is designed to be populated, to contain infills and images, so it is recognizable enough for everyone to feel and be part of London 2012. IMPACT The ambition—everyone’s—is already shaping London 2012. For the first time the Olympic and Paralympic Games will share the same brand, using their own variant of the emblem. And in another first, the Cultural Olympiad will be able to share the brand. New technology is being put in place to get everyone closer to the action and more deeply involved. Digital media will be used to create a Games in which everyone can play a part wherever they are. The brand we created will shape the experience of 2012. It will take the Games beyond sport, creating wider interest and even greater inspiration. It will create a Games for everyone. © Wolff Olins
  • 19. UNILEVER: ADDING VITALITY TO BUSINESS AMBITION Unilever is big. 150 million times a day, in 150 countries, people choose to make Unilever brands part of their lives. But in the consumer goods industry, growth is hard. Unilever decided that it was too diffuse, with too many brands and with no unifying driver of growth. Unilever wanted to become a single-minded, idea-led growth business. ACTION Wolff Olins helped Unilever change, from an invisible owner of brands to a much more visible business, leading its brands through a single idea: “adding vitality to life.” We created a visual identity that expresses “Vitality” and that is starting to appear on every Unilever product. Under this banner, we also worked on dozens of projects to put vitality at the heart of the organization – from designing workplaces to transforming the recruitment process t o training employees how to pass on the stories that underlie the idea. And we’ve helped Unilever invent new products and projects that deliver vitality. IMPACT Since implementation of the Vitality idea, Unilever’s operating profit has increased at an average rate of more than 15% per year. Every Unilever business, from China to Argentina, has embraced the Vitality idea. Unilever is using the idea to determine which businesses to invest in, which to exit from, and where to innovate, and now spends almost €1 billion a year on vitality-driven innovation. Results are coming through: the new vitality-inspired Knorr Vie drink, for example, has sold 60 million bottles since launch, driving Unilever’s profits to new heights. © Wolff Olins
  • 20. GE: MOST ADMIRED TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY POWERHOUSE With 300,000 people in 174 countries, and 3,500 businesses, all number one or two in their markets, GE defined the 20th century corporation. With the transfer of leadership from Jack Welch to Jeff Immelt, GE was poised for transformation. From manufacturing to technology and service. From US-centric to an emphasis on Asia and Europe. From a business driven by organizational silos to greater focus on the customer. From an under-leveraged atomized old-world brand to a 21st century powerhouse of innovation and impact. MARKET-FACING BRAND Wolff Olins worked with GE to create a market-facing brand architecture that hugely simplified its portfolio of businesses into solution platforms for customers. This allowed GE to enhance existing relationships with businesses and develop new relationships with consumers. We created a modern identity that liberates and celebrates the GE monogram, and that’s flexible enough to work with everything from jet engines to light bulbs. We traveled the world to excite GE leaders about the brand idea ‘Imagination at work’, and defined with them how the brand should be made real throughout the business. $25 BILLION NEW REVENUES GE was named “most admired company” for two years running by Fortune magazine. It’s now pitching to countries and governments, using its new ability to bring unified solutions to its customers. $25 billion in additional revenues have been added by 85 “Imagination breakthroughs,” inspired by the brand idea. GE is now the fourth biggest brand in the world, valued in 2008 at $53 billion. © Wolff Olins
  • 21. MERCEDES-BENZ: 10 MONTHS, 3 NEW BUSINESSES GROWING A GLOBAL ICON In 2007, Daimler set up a team of senior executives to develop new growth initiatives beyond the world of cars. Having identified the brand as one of the most important assets to leverage, the Business Innovation team approached Wolff Olins to help develop appropriate businesses to generated new and profitable growth without putting one of the world’s most iconic brands at risk. FROM IDEAS TO REALITY Wolff Olins developed a brand-led innovation framework that ensures that each venture protects the Mercedes-Benz brand, leverages what is tangibly special about it (e.g., German engineering), gives the brand new relevance in the world (attracting younger customers and building new sustainability credentials) and makes money (with a return on sales of 20% or more). Working with Daimler’s Business Innovation team and the leaders of the business in UK, US, China and Japan, we developed ten new businesses to pilot. In January 2009 (ten months after the commencement of the project), Daimler launched solutions for family mobility at the Mercedes-Benz brand centre in Surrey UK. A PLATFORM FOR GROWTH Kinderclass has already led to a significant increase in the sale of child safety accessories and continues to attract younger families to the Mercedes-Benz brand. Later in 2009, a new high profile venture and an exclusive travel service will be launched in the UK and China, respectively. Wolff Olins continues to provide advice and creative assistance as other products and services are being developed and launched around the world. © Wolff Olins © Wolff Olins Page 21
  • 22. BEELINE: RUSSIA’S TOP BRAND COMPETE FOR LOYALTY In 2005, the Russian mobile communications market was approaching saturation, especially in Moscow. The challenge was to turn Beeline into a brand that could stand apart and compete effectively in this context. A more clearly differentiated position was required, one that focused on creating long-term customer relationships and deeper emotional bonds to drive real loyalty. This, combined with a strong identity, has been key to setting a new standard in the Russian market. BRIGHT SIDE With Beeline and BBDO, Wolff Olins developed a new positioning, identity, communications style, image libraries and campaign for launch. We then rolled out the brand across all communications, packaging, retail, web and HQ interiors, alongside a number of internal brand-building initiatives. The rebrand was a huge success and at the end of 2005 revenue was up by 40%, market capitalization by 28% and ARPU by 7%. We continue to work with Beeline as it grows into new regions and product areas. MOST VALUABLE Since relaunching the brand, Beeline has been independently ranked the most valuable brand in Russia for three consecutive years, according to Interbrand Zintzmeyer & Lux in Business Week. It has become the benchmark for all recent brand launches and the one to beat in mobile telephony. © Wolff Olins
  • 23. (RED) EMBRACING CONSCIOUS COMMERCE AMBITION (RED)’s ambition was to harness the power of the world’s greatest companies to help eliminate AIDS in Africa. To do this, it created both a new business model and a new brand model to achieve three goals: deliver a source of sustainable income for the Global Fund, provide consumers with a choice that makes giving effortless and last but not least, generate profits and a sense of purpose for partner companies. ACTION The first challenge was to get the all-important founding partners on board. So we helped Bobby Shriver and Bono paint a vision of what (RED) could be. This vision of the future provoked Amex, Converse, Emporio Armani and Gap to take the plunge. We built the brand around the idea that (RED) inspires, connects and gives consumers power, with a unique brand architecture that unites participating businesses by literally embracing their logos to the power (RED). Many partners have gone the extra mile and manufactured products or packaging in African countries, generating jobs and opportunities for local people. IMPACT Within the first five weeks of the US launch, the (RED) brand registered 30% unaided awareness. Over 1.35 million people watched a YouTube video showing the impact and there are over 850,000 (RED) friends on MySpace. In its first two years, (RED) partners delivered $108 million to the Global Fund, more than most countries donated in the same period. This is enough money to give 650,000 people life-saving drugs for a year. © Wolff Olins
  • 24. NYC: THE UNBRANDABLE CITY AMBITION There’s only one New York City. But within that one city are five boroughs, approximately 191 neighborhoods, nearly a million buildings and over 8.2 million people. Each individual has their own New York. Within the mind of every single New Yorker resides a different version of New York City. It’s a city loved in 138 different languages and viewed through an almost infinite mix of cultures, ideologies and ways of life. Everyone living side-by-side. This kaleidoscopic quality is one of the greatest things about this city. It’s the very thing we love. But it also makes it difficult to represent. There is no one symbol, no one logo or brand that means New York City to everyone. ACTION To create a brand for New York City, the challenge was not to define a purpose, but to capture an essence. This was articulated by the idea: “only one, but no one NYC.” The resulting brand identity has now been embraced not just by New York City’s official marketing, tourism and partnership organization, NYC & Company, but across many City departments. IMPACT From what was once many disparate and confusing identities, the NYC brand has become the singular strong voice for the City, clearly articulated. Tourism revenues rose and the first international advertising campaign has launched, bringing this rigorous brand to a global audience. © Wolff Olins
  • 25.
  • 26.
  • 27. 140 PEOPLE 21 LANGUAGES 3 OFFICES 1BUSINESS PART OF OMNICOM © Wolff Olins © Wolff Olins Page 27
  • 28. Michael Wolff and Wally Olins set up Wolff Olins in 1965. The 80s was the great age of corporate identity. Wally wrote the book. We worked For 3i, Q8 and In the 60s, we did convention-breaking design work for Prudential. Repsol took us into Spain. And we created big companies like boc, for government bodies like a little banking brand in Britain called First Direct. Camden and for the Beatles. We started the 90s with Europe’s biggest corporate In the 70s, we pioneered corporate identity for P&O. identity project, BT, and then morphed into branding with And with tough economic times in Britain, we moved into Orange, then Heathrow Express. And we closed France with Colr and Germany with Aral. the decade by opening in New York. In the 00s, we’ve become a world business with GE, Oi, PwC and (RED) in the Americas. Beeline, London 2012, Macmillan, Sony Ericsson, Tate and Unilever in Europe. And Airtel, Sony, Tokyo Metro and Wacom in Asia. © Wolff Olins Page 28
  • 29. WE’D LOVE TO TALK: Gilles Guilbert Main: +1 212 505 7337 Direct: +1 212 471 1520 Cell: +1 917 721 9068 gilles.guilbert@wolffolins.com Wolff Olins 200 Varick Street 10th Floor New York, NY 10014 www.wolffolins.com Page 29 Page 29