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Capital Metro presentation WVCC meeting July 2014

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Capital Metro presentation WVCC meeting July 2014

  1. 1. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014June 2014 A vision for Canberra Building a sustainable city
  2. 2. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 What is light rail? Modern, efficient and highly effective public transport Integrates into urban areas Low floor Energy efficient Smooth, stable and highly reliable transport High capacity, can carry 200- 300 passengers Used in over 400 cities worldwide
  3. 3. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Building the nation Source: Weekend Australian 14 June 2014
  4. 4. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Light rail trend in Australia GoldCoast Newcastle Sydney Canberra Melbourne Adelaide Perth Darwin SunshineCoast WesternSydney Hobart
  5. 5. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Benefits of light rail
  6. 6. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Peak hour pain Source: Weekend Australian 14 June 2014
  7. 7. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 An enabler for City Plan, C2L & Australia Forum
  8. 8. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Light Rail Master Plan • The Light Rail Master Plan will examine options for a potential future light rail network for the Territory. • Technical analysis of all light rail route and network options, stations and stops has commenced. • Stakeholder consultation with Community Councils occured in June to inform the development of the draft Light Rail Master Plan. • Community consultation of the draft Light Rail Master Plan will occur in September and October. • The Light Rail Master Plan will be finalised in early 2015.
  9. 9. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR) Capital Metro will provide a business case to government. BCR greater than 1. This means the benefits are greater than the cost, including: Transportation derived benefits (time savings, reliability, vehicle operating costs, environmental, accident costs, health, amenity, residual value, public transport operating savings); Land use benefits (urban densification, infrastructure efficiency savings); and Wider economic benefits (such as bringing firms into closer proximity).
  10. 10. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Stage 1 Design: key themes Strategic Approach – the design and planning principles guiding the project including the underpinning context The Passenger Experience – what you can expect as a light rail passenger in Canberra Nuts and bolts – what we are building and how it will work Urban landscape – the look and feel of the area surrounding light rail
  11. 11. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Strategic approach The landscape The Griffin Legacy The Policy Framework Urban design principles
  12. 12. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Urban design principles
  13. 13. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Passenger experience A frequent and reliable service Integrated ticketing Wifi connectivity Real time information Highly accessible stop and vehicles Cycling connectivity
  14. 14. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Operations Services every 10 minutes (5 min peak) Capacity of around 200 Target journey time of 25min or less Journey times are driven by: Stop numbers Traffic light numbers Ability to avoid congestion Light phasing Loading times
  15. 15. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Nuts and bolts of the system The route and stop locations The route alignment The Depot Powering the system Stop and Shelter Design Traffic Management Track treatments
  16. 16. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 The alignment Proposed alignment is in the median Proposal based on previous and current investigations. Rationale: aligns with the Griffin plans for Canberra retains the current traffic capacity and least disruption to traffic less impact for businesses, facilities and residents along route already a wide median, resulting in many construction benefits prioritisation for light rail services at intersections is made much easier results in a lower cost than other options due to combined infrastructure
  17. 17. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 The route and stops Runs from Alinga Street in the City to Gungahlin Place Gungahlin Place supports an interchange 13 stops preferred, 15 being displayed for community input Stop locations have considered previous community input plus our technical analysis Stopping at Alinga Street allows future extension options in each direction
  18. 18. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 The depot
  19. 19. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Powering the system Currently wire-based. Only a small number of systems use wire-free technology. Due to cost, technical complexity and reliability of the system. As systems mature, wire-free will be more of an option. 7 substations will support the system.
  20. 20. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Stop and shelter design The design of the light rail stops, shelters and associated features will be an evolving process. We will recommend a look and feel and basic design principles (below). We want to maintain flexibility to allow for innovation.
  21. 21. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Traffic management Pedestrianisation of Hibberson Street No unsignalised crossings of the light rail tracks New sets of lights proposed No significant changes to the lanes along Northbourne Avenue Some parts of the Federal Highway and Flemington Road will require some realignment or widening Single lane in each direction between Sandford Street in Mitchell and the Federal Highway Detailed stakeholder briefings underway to plan access requirements
  22. 22. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Track treatments Will be defined in later stages Track surface selection is driven by safety, efficiency, reliability and aesthetic value. Finish types concrete, paving, decomposed granites, asphalt, ballast or grass. Brest, France Bordeaux, France Bilbao, Spain
  23. 23. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Urban Landscape Section 1 – Hibberson Street Gungahlin ‘creating a safe and high quality pedestrian mall’ Section 2 – Harrison to Gungahlin ‘the classic boulevard’ Section 3 – Flemington Road South ‘a framework for future development’ Section 4 – Federal Highway ‘Canberra’s northern approach’ Sections 5 and 6 ‘Redefining the entrance to the Nation’s Capital’
  24. 24. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Urban Landscape – Northbourne Avenue Many of the trees on Northbourne Avenue are in decline and will need to be replaced regardless of Capital Metro We are committed to renewing Northbourne Avenue as a tree-lined avenue Opportunity to redefine the entry to the nation’s capital. Asking the community what we want the entrance to say about Canberra and what impression do we want to convey to visitors? We are currently considering options for replacement trees.
  25. 25. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Opportunities for input Attend a local information session at Dickson and Gungahlin Shopping Centres Visit the Capital Metro Information Centre at the bus interchange, City Walk Arcade, 2 Mort Street Email us at CMAfeedback@act.gov.au Post a question or comment on our Facebook page ‘Capital Metro ACT’ Contact us on Twitter @CapitalMetroACT Write to us at: GPO Box 158, Canberra ACT 2601
  26. 26. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Local Industry Participation Local industry well represented in the Technical Advisor Group 40% local companies on the specialist advisor panel Local industry participation policy recently released and will form basis for a full plan to be delivered later this year Capital Metro Agency are: Requesting a list of suppliers from MBA to provide to bidders Consulting with industry to understand opportunities and to develop the full plan Holding an industry briefing to occur in coming months
  27. 27. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014
  28. 28. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014 Five reasons why we need light rail Canberra has a vision and light rail plays a big role We can’t keep building more roads for more cars Diversifying the economy and creating jobs Better health and environment Connecting communities and opportunities
  29. 29. A vision for Canberra: Building a sustainable cityJune 2014June 2014 Capital Metro New Century, New Connections

Editor's Notes

  • It is amazing how many Australian cities are investing in new or expanded light rail systems.

    The common denominator is not just capacity but the ability of this mode to delivery city-changing transformation, including revitalisation, more sustainable operations and improved health and social outcomes.
  • Light rail will be an enabler for the City Plan and the City to the Lake and Australia Forum developments.

    Capital Metro is inherently connected to the City Plan and it acts as a catalyst for positive change, sustainable growth and great transport links.

    One of the main reasons for choosing light rail is its ability to catalyse urban transformation and revitalisation along the declining Northbourne Avenue corridor.

    Lessons from around the world show that land-use benefits are greatest when transit investment occurs just before an upswing in growth. Projections and recent experience indicate that the corridor is set for rapid growth over the coming decades.

    Alongside the City Plan, the ACT Strategic Plan and Transport Plan are working together to manage projected population growth along this important corridor.

    Capital Metro will provide business and investment certainty along the corridor, stimulating significant economic activity as land surrounding the light rail increases in value and is used more efficiently.

    Urban renewal and transformation along the transport corridor is expected to drive new opportunities for other parts of the city, such as employment and investment opportunities.

    Capital Metro will also support cross-government city-building initiatives.



  • The Canberra Light Rail Master Plan is a major project for ESDD over 2014. The Light Rail Master Plan will identify a future potential light rail network and guide decision making about future extensions to Capital Metro Stage 1. The Canberra Light Rail Master Plan will be an integrated land use and transport plan and will link residential development with areas of employment, retail and entertainment with high quality, fast and frequent light rail.

    The Light Rail Master Plan will deliver on Government policies, including Transport for Canberra, the ACT Planning Strategy and the City Plan and will build on the Government’s work already undertaken on light rail and integrated land use and transport planning.

    ESDD is also working closely with the Capital Metro Agency, as many of the decisions about the whole light rail network will have implications for the planning and design of Stage 1 between Gungahlin and Civic, and vice versa.

    We will be talking to key stakeholders in June, including community councils, about light rail network options to inform the development of the draft Light Rail Master Plan. The community will then have the opportunity to provide input on the draft light rail master plan in September and October. The Light Rail Master Plan will be finalised in early 2015.
  • A number of transport projects have been progressed without Infrastructure Australia endorsement, or with publicly stated BCRs of less than 2.0, including:
    East West Link in Victoria – $1bn committed by Abbott Government despite the project not having a full business case or finalised route.
    North-West Rail Link – BCR 1.4
    Light rail extension Lilyfield to Dulwich Hill (Sydney) – BCR 1.0
    Light rail extension to Lilyfield to Lewisham (Sydney) – BCR 1.6
    Liverpool – Parramatta T-way – 1.1 – 1.7
    F3 Freeway to Orbital – BCR 1.2 – 1.4
  • At the 2011 census, the population of the district was 46,971 and this figure is expected to rise to 60,000 by the year 2016; and to grow to 72,900 by 2021.

  • As part of the design process, the alignment of the rail tracks within the corridor was investigated to identify the best option. This built on previous studies and consultations held in 2012 by URS that looked at both kerbside and median alignments.

    The project team looked at the pros and cons of locating the tracks in the median (centre of the road) or on either side of the road or within the road lanes.

    Through this investigation, the median alignment has been proposed as the preferred alignment, here’s why:

    It aligns with the Griffin plans for Canberra which allowed wide medians for rail transport
    It retains the current traffic capacity and it creates the least disruption to traffic
    It has less direct impact on access for businesses, facilities and residents on either side of the road
    When light rail operates in traffic lanes it can complicate the turning movements at each intersection
    There is already a wide median for the majority of the corridor, which provides significant construction and operation benefits
    It removes the need to widen intersections that are already taking up a significant area (such as the intersection of Antill Street and Northbourne Avenue in Dickson)
    It supports the ability to provide prioritisation for light rail services without significant changes to current traffic light operations.

    A median alignment does mean that we need to carefully consider the trees along the corridor...
  • Every light rail system needs a depot for stabling and maintaining of light rail vehicles.
    The depot also acts as a base for drivers and other company employees.
    Desirable to locate the depot in an industrial zone, away from residential areas.
    The Capital Metro depot is planned to be located off Flemington Road in Mitchell, nearby the ACT Government building at 9 Sandford Street.
    Site provides good access to the light rail alignment and will fit well with the adjacent ACT Government operations.
    The location and its access arrangements will mean there is minimal impact to traffic, including no impact on morning peak traffic.
  • The early design for Stage 1 includes a wire-based system.

    Only a small number of systems use wire-free technology and only two cities have systems where the whole route is wire free.

    This is due to cost, technical complexity and reliability of the system.

    Wired systems are currently more proven in terms of reliability and therefore our current designs show a wired solution.

    As systems mature, wire-free will be more of an option. Wired systems have improved technology and are quite discreet, especially when placed amongst a boulevard of trees.

    Substations
    Substations provide traction power to the light rail vehicles across the network. The Capital Metro Stage One system will include seven substations spread along the alignment.
     
    A typical substation is a pre-fabricated modular building that is 12 metres long, 4.5 metres wide and 3.8 metres tall. The facade of these buildings can be fitted with external materials, to help it blend into the urban environment, as well as considering planting to help screen from view.
     
    The substation locations are still under consideration and will need to:
     
    be in safe and secure areas
    provide a relatively even spread of power across the network
    blend in with the urban environment
    be easily accessible for ongoing maintenance  
  • Adding light rail to a traffic network is a significant step that must be well planned to ensure it integrates well and provides a safe traffic environment.

    With this in mind, it is proposed that there will be no unsignalised crossings of the light rail tracks.

    This is a common arrangement for modern light rail systems and it is aimed at avoiding accidents between trams and cars in free turning situations.

    This will mean that new signalised intersections will be introduced at 8 points along the route, often in line with planned upgrades for the road network. Potential sites for new traffic signals include:

    The intersection of Hinder and Hibberson Streets in Gungahlin
    The intersection of Kate Crace and Hibberson Streets in Gungahlin
    The intersection of Lysaght Street and Flemington Road in Mitchell (if this stop is preferred)
    The access point to the depot on Flemington Road in Mitchell (to be used only as required)
    The intersection Randwick Road and Flemington Road in Mitchell
    The intersections of Murdoch and Morphett Streets and Northbourne Avenue in Dickson will be the subject of further investigations but in each case, crossing of the light rail tracks will be managed by traffic lights
    The access to the Mitchell Resource Management Centre
    The intersection Swinden Street and the Federal Highway in Downer (if this stop is preferred)

    Further work is being done to understand traffic requirements in these areas and Capital Metro will be undertaking targeted stakeholder discussions through this area.

    Traffic changes
    Will the lanes on Northbourne be changed?
    With the alignment planned to run in the median, there will not be significant changes to the lanes on Northbourne Avenue.
    Will there be new traffic lights installed?
    New traffic lights will be introduced along the route to ensure that wherever vehicles cross the light rail tracks this is controlled safely. This will mean that where right turns currently occur in the median today, such as Morphett and Murdoch Street, this will be controlled by traffic lights.
    Are there any changes planned for the Federal Highway or Flemington Road?
    Some parts of the Federal Highway and Flemington Road will require some realignment or widening to allow space for the light rail, vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians.
    Between Sandford Street in Mitchell and the Flemington Highway, light rail is planned to take up the inside lanes in each direction. This means that normal vehicles will move into the current bus lane when driving into the city.
    Will there be traffic changes in Gungahlin?
    * The following intersections will be upgraded to include traffic lights:
    Flemington Road and Kate Crace Street
    Flemington Road and Hinder Street
    *Hibberson Street will become a pedestrian mall between Hinder Street and Gungahlin Place.
    * Buses will use Gungahlin Place as a major interchange point with the light rail.


  • As part of the Capital Metro project, we have been looking at the broader corridor and how light rail can integrate with its surroundings.
    In our early designs we have identified six distinct precincts along the corridor and set urban design objectives for each, these are summarised below.
    Precinct 1 – Hibberson Street Gungahlin
    ‘creating a safe and high quality pedestrian mall’
    Build on the already bustling character of the existing streetscape
    Integrate with bus services
    Precinct 2 – Harrison to Gungahlin
    ‘the classic boulevard’
    Strengthen the boulevard by increasing tree plantings on both sides of the light rail
    Precinct 3 – Flemington Road South
    ‘a framework for future development’
    Strengthen the avenue
    Plant new street trees
    Precinct 4 – Federal Highway
    ‘Canberra’s northern approach’
    Define the northern entrance to the city
    Improve pedestrian connections
    Redefining the entrance to the Nation’s Capital – Precincts 5 and 6
    We now know that the trees on Northbourne Avenue are in decline and are poorly suited to the Canberra climate. They will need to be replaced in the near future regardless of the light rail project.
    Now is a great time to start discussing how we should redefine this important corridor that also acts as the entry to the national capital. What do we want the entrance to say about Canberra? What impression do we want to convey to visitors to the city?
    The ACT Government is committed to restoring Northbourne to a tree-lined avenue with more trees along the corridor - on the median and the verges - and is keen to hear views on the future of look and feel of the corridor. What kind of colour and landscaping would work well? Should it look different throughout the seasons? Should it reflect different aspects of all the Australian states and territories?
    To feed into this discussion on the look and feel of corridor, we are investigating suitable tree species. Light rail can work really well with the right species of trees, integrating seamlessly with beautiful tree-lined urban boulevards.
     


    The Technical Advisor Consultant team has completed some initial reports that provide detailed project information and a Base Case design that will form the basis for internal discussions. Within this body of work is an assessment of the following:
    The number and location of all trees on Northbourne Avenue median
    The health of these trees, including a comparison to the 2010 assessment
    A description of how many trees are estimated to be potentially impacted through the construction of the light rail system
    An outline of how trees may be incorporated into the future alignment
  • History of the Northbourne Avenue Trees  
     
    In circa 1913 the first trees along Northbourne Avenue were planted. Thomas Charles Weston, working under the guidance of Walter Burley Griffin, took inspiration for the grand boulevards of Paris and other European cities. The vision was not realised due to the limited availability of imported stock in Australia at the time.
    In the 1940s the trees along Northbourne were replaced by Eucalyptus mannifera (Spotted White Gum) and Eucalyptus blakelyi (Red Gum). These native trees suffered from an insect infestation of psyllids that required the removal of the trees.
    The trees that currently line Northbourne Avenue were planted in the early 1980s. The species chosen for the replanting was the Eucalyptus elata (River Peppermint). It’s important to note these species are not indigenous to the area, and are typically found in moist valleys in coastal ranges of NSW.
     
    The current trees – Eucalyptus elata (River Peppermint)
    Can reach heights of 25 metres and widths of 12 metres.
    Originated from the central tablelands and southern coastal ranges of NSW, extending into Victoria, and most commonly found in damp gullies.
    More suited to temperate climates and only moderately suited to Canberra’s climate.
    Performance is not always good, particularly on harder sites.
    Fast growing.
    Proven susceptible to falling over during high winds due to shallow root systems.
     
    Assessment of trees in the Northbourne Avenue Corridor
    In recent times the trees along this famous gateway have been assessed; once in 2010 and recently in March 2014.
    The 2010 assessment noted 802 trees in the corridor and of these, 513 were noted as being in good health.
    The March 2014 assessment, completed by local firm dsb Landscape Architects found that through failing health, storm damage and removal of dead or dangerous trees, the total number of trees has dropped to 484.
    Within the remaining 484 trees, the number of healthy trees now sits at 202 and this number is expected to continue to decline in coming years.
     Need to think about placement
  • Dickson Shopping Centre (near Woolworths) Saturday 12th July, 9am -1pm
    Gungahlin Village (near Coles) Saturday 19th July, 9am-1pm
    Dickson Shopping Centre (near Woolworths) Saturday 26th July, 9am -1p
    Gungahlin  Marketplace (near Big W), Saturday 2nd August, 9am -1pm
     

  • Canberra has a vision and light rail plays a big role
    Canberra needs to keep growing as a smart and sustainable city. We are growing towards a population of 500,000 and that growth must be directed by a vision that includes high quality transport connections, more active lifestyles and a revitalised city centre. Light rail will play an important role in delivering this vision and it will help to reduce the congestion that costs Canberra over $100 million every year.
    We can’t keep building more roads for more cars
    Canberra has the highest car dependency of any major Australian city and we travel further in our cars than residents in any other major city in Australia. As the city grows this car and road reliance will become unsustainable and the grandest road network plans will not allow us to keep growing sustainably and responsibly. One light rail vehicle will hold up to 300 people, equating to 300 cars off the road. This will improve traffic congestion and our environment.
    Diversifying the economy and creating jobs
    The Capital Metro project has a positive benefit cost ratio and it is forecast to support 3,500 jobs during construction. In a time when Canberra needs jobs, light rail will deliver. Light Rail also has a track record of driving extra commercial activity along its route. Passenger exposure and the convenience of living and operating businesses near light rail stops, drives significant commercial opportunities.
    Better health and environment
    Light rail will support a big reduction in emissions and a much healthier lifestyle. Today in Canberra the vast majority of people sit in cars as part of our daily commute and many of these cars are carrying just one person. If the 200 or more people that light rail can carry left the car at home, walked to a light rail stop, enjoyed a quick and smooth trip and then walked to work their health and our precious local environment would benefit immensely. 
    Connecting  Communities
    The corridor between Gungahlin and the City is bursting with opportunities and they need to be connected. Decades of planning is contributing to a revitalised Northbourne Avenue, fast growing mixed use areas in Gungahlin and a major upgrade to Dickson’s commercial precinct. The certainty of light rail tracks in the ground and high frequency and high capacity services is the glue that connects the opportunities together.

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