TIBET <ul><li>June 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Rev. James Lienert, MSF  </li></ul>
GEOLOGY FIELD TRIP TO NEPAL AND TIBET <ul><li>This trip was organized by Dr. Thomas Laudon, a retired professor  of geolog...
We arrived in Lhasa (Tibet) the 2 nd  of May and returned to Katmandu (Nepal) on June 1 st
Flight from Kathmandu to Lhasa Note the Himalaya peaks poking through the clouds.
<ul><li>When we arrived in Lhasa arrangements for the trip were in disarray. First of all, since  camping had been banned,...
TRILOBITE 0GYGOPSIS - CAMBRIAN <ul><li>The streets of Lhasa teem with insistent peddlers and tiny sidewalk shops. One shop...
The Potala, the  Winter palace of the Dalai Lama
Dr. Laudon and I
Roof of a Buddhist Monastery
Inside a Buddhist shrine
Party in Lhasa for 76 th  birthday
Along the Way: returning to Kathmandu
Sheets of wind-driven sand on the mountain slopes.
The group studying geology.
About the highest altitude on the trip: 5220 m = 17,126 feet.
Yak and young rider.
A shepherd spinning thread while tending his sheep.
An eating place in a remote village. In such a place I saw a jar of genuine Mexican Nescafé. (instant coffee) Hardly belie...
<ul><li>One of the places where we stayed for the  </li></ul><ul><li>night. On about the second night out as we  </li></ul...
Dr. Laudon and the geologist studying.
A common sight.
Drying cakes of yak dung and straw for fueling the stove.  In places wood is very scarce.
A BROKEN SYNCLINE
A GLACIER
QOMOLANGMA – MOUNT EVEREST <ul><li>We arrived here at Rongbuk, a  </li></ul><ul><li>Buddhist monastery near to which is </...
Picture taken later from the courtyard of Buddhist guest house.
The next morning, leaving Rongbuk for Tingri. The night had been warm and there had been more snow and glacier melt. Other...
Tibetan women loading rock onto a truck for road construction. There was no way to pass them.
Tingri, where we spent the last night in Tibet
This scene is only a few miles west of Tingri. It is the point of dramatic transition between a cold and stark landscape a...
Note the road clinging to the side of the canyon. We were now in a bus going down, and so on the outside lane. Many times ...
LIPING  Border crossing between Nepal (left) and Tibet (right). Picture taken from a small eating place. It was late after...
TIBET <ul><li>June 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Rev. James Lienert, MSF  </li></ul>♫  Thais ♫
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Tibet

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Padre Jaime in Tibet

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Tibet

  1. 1. TIBET <ul><li>June 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Rev. James Lienert, MSF </li></ul>
  2. 2. GEOLOGY FIELD TRIP TO NEPAL AND TIBET <ul><li>This trip was organized by Dr. Thomas Laudon, a retired professor of geology at </li></ul><ul><li>University of Wisconsin, at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Laudon is on the far left. </li></ul>Atop the Potala. Lhasa, Tibet
  3. 3. We arrived in Lhasa (Tibet) the 2 nd of May and returned to Katmandu (Nepal) on June 1 st
  4. 4. Flight from Kathmandu to Lhasa Note the Himalaya peaks poking through the clouds.
  5. 5. <ul><li>When we arrived in Lhasa arrangements for the trip were in disarray. First of all, since camping had been banned, hotel rooms had to be reserved for along the route. Next, the tour specifications called for an English speaking guide with a degree in geology to accompany the group. We waited for four days, but none was to be found. Time was being lost. Dr. Laudon already had a geology guide book, and the corresponding places of interest were well marked with a sign along the route. So we settled for an interpreter who was fluent in English. We had used the intervening time to see some of the city. </li></ul>
  6. 6. TRILOBITE 0GYGOPSIS - CAMBRIAN <ul><li>The streets of Lhasa teem with insistent peddlers and tiny sidewalk shops. One shop was offering fossils. This one, almost exact sixe as the picture, caught my eye. “How much?” “500 yuan.” - “Too much.” - “400” - “No.” - “300” - “No” - “Then, what would you give me for it?” - “100” - “I would lose money at that price.” I start to walk away. “Yours for 100 yuan.” The only souvenir of Tibet that I have kept. Dr. Laudon said he was quite sure it was a ogygopisis. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Potala, the Winter palace of the Dalai Lama
  8. 8. Dr. Laudon and I
  9. 9. Roof of a Buddhist Monastery
  10. 10. Inside a Buddhist shrine
  11. 11. Party in Lhasa for 76 th birthday
  12. 12. Along the Way: returning to Kathmandu
  13. 13. Sheets of wind-driven sand on the mountain slopes.
  14. 14. The group studying geology.
  15. 15. About the highest altitude on the trip: 5220 m = 17,126 feet.
  16. 16. Yak and young rider.
  17. 17. A shepherd spinning thread while tending his sheep.
  18. 18. An eating place in a remote village. In such a place I saw a jar of genuine Mexican Nescafé. (instant coffee) Hardly believable! The stove is a clever way to use all the heat from rare fuel.
  19. 19. <ul><li>One of the places where we stayed for the </li></ul><ul><li>night. On about the second night out as we </li></ul><ul><li>unloaded our duffel bags, Dr Laudon saw a </li></ul><ul><li>man coming in with a geologist’s pick. He </li></ul><ul><li>approached the man who spoke broken </li></ul><ul><li>English. It happened to be the very same </li></ul><ul><li>geologist who wrote the guide Dr. Laudon </li></ul><ul><li>was using! A friendship ensued, and Dr. </li></ul><ul><li>Laudon hired the geologist to accompany </li></ul><ul><li>our group for the rest of the tour. For Dr. </li></ul><ul><li>Laudon it was a tremendous opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>to learn so much more about the geology </li></ul><ul><li>of the Himalayas which is very complex. </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence of every geological Period is </li></ul><ul><li>found here including the Cambrian. See my </li></ul><ul><li>fossil. Even pieces of the Mantel. Note in </li></ul><ul><li>The pictures the wide variety of rocks. </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Dr. Laudon and the geologist studying.
  21. 21. A common sight.
  22. 22. Drying cakes of yak dung and straw for fueling the stove. In places wood is very scarce.
  23. 23. A BROKEN SYNCLINE
  24. 24. A GLACIER
  25. 25. QOMOLANGMA – MOUNT EVEREST <ul><li>We arrived here at Rongbuk, a </li></ul><ul><li>Buddhist monastery near to which is </li></ul><ul><li>located the Tibetan base camp for Mt. </li></ul><ul><li>Everest. Qomolangma was shrouded </li></ul><ul><li>in clouds; it was only when we were </li></ul><ul><li>already in the shadow in a valley </li></ul><ul><li>when for brief moments the clouds </li></ul><ul><li>allowed us a glimpse of the peak </li></ul><ul><li>just to right of center in the picture. </li></ul><ul><li>Actually this made for a spectacular </li></ul><ul><li>picture. </li></ul><ul><li>The road leads to the base camp which is </li></ul><ul><li>about a quarter of a mile farther on. </li></ul><ul><li>We stayed in the monastery guest </li></ul><ul><li>house where the toilet was the <squat </li></ul><ul><li>and aim> version. </li></ul><ul><li>The morning temperature was still above </li></ul><ul><li>freezing. </li></ul><ul><li>Breakfast was in the kitchen of the guest </li></ul><ul><li>house. </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Picture taken later from the courtyard of Buddhist guest house.
  27. 27. The next morning, leaving Rongbuk for Tingri. The night had been warm and there had been more snow and glacier melt. Other vehicles came later and crossed just a few yards to this side of ours. Our drivers had miscalculated. Later on a large truck came from the opposite direction. A tow line was attached and pulled us out. My duffle bag was in the blue Bronco and part of the contents was lost . Later in the day the brakes of the tan Bronco failed, and it was several hours before they were repaired. The drivers never used the motor for braking because transmissions are much more expensive to repair.
  28. 28. Tibetan women loading rock onto a truck for road construction. There was no way to pass them.
  29. 29. Tingri, where we spent the last night in Tibet
  30. 30. This scene is only a few miles west of Tingri. It is the point of dramatic transition between a cold and stark landscape and the warmer and lush. The road from Tibet to Nepal is down that canyon to the right of the center.
  31. 31. Note the road clinging to the side of the canyon. We were now in a bus going down, and so on the outside lane. Many times we had to stop to let another vehicle pass. We were so close to the edge that we could not see the road below on the right. Of course there is not any guard rail. The door was on the right, and so it was not possible to alight and take some dramatic pictures.
  32. 32. LIPING Border crossing between Nepal (left) and Tibet (right). Picture taken from a small eating place. It was late afternoon and we had not eaten since breakfast in Tingri.
  33. 33. TIBET <ul><li>June 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Rev. James Lienert, MSF </li></ul>♫ Thais ♫

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