September 2013
How London’s Olympic legacy
is coming to life | Pages 8&9
this is
concrete
This is Concrete is supported by...
2 Sustainable cities
AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013...
3Sustainable cities
AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013...
Driving toward a
zero-carbon future
INDUSTRY VIEW
S
ustainable transport is essential, not
just because it can help cities...
“To understand the importance
of resilience, you just need to look at
the stats coming out of the US from
the past five to...
‘Key to sustainable cities
is embracing clean cloud’
AS smart cities grow, the amount of data
gathered, stored, and analys...
ExpertInsight
Solutions
for a more
efficient
tomorrow
Heat pumps are a
cost effective and safe
alternative to heating
INDU...
ALMOSTtenyearsafterAthenshosted
theOlympicGames,thegloryofmedals,
adrenalineandstrikinginfrastructure
burnsonlyasadistantm...
Main: an artist’s
impression of
how a nearby
neighbourhood
might look, with
Olympic venues to
the right
Below:
constructio...
ExpertInsight
A
ccording to the UK Green
Building Council, by 2050, 75 per
cent of the world’s population
is expected to l...
I
ndustry is beginning to recognise
the important contribution
of engineers who understand
precisely how a building’s exte...
ExpertInsight
Sustainably
developing
city
infrastructure
Siemens is working to ensure
that global urbanisation can
support...
AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 | 13
orld
SETTING t...
EcoReportZone Smarter ways
of keeping
the heat in
What part can renewa-
bles play in the future
of our energy supplies?
Es...
The debate
What makes a successful sustainable city?
Chris Macey
Chief executive
Wintech Façade Engineers
Sustainablecitie...
Sustainable Cities
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Sustainable Cities

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The Sustainable Cities Eco Report is a supplement by The Sunday Telegraph. The September 2013 edition includes features by Wintech Ltd and examines the role of the facade engineer in sustainability and construction.

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Sustainable Cities

  1. 1. September 2013 How London’s Olympic legacy is coming to life | Pages 8&9 this is concrete This is Concrete is supported by MPA The Concrete Centre Concrete is the most ethically and responsibly sourced material. 92%* of concrete is certified to BES 6001, the most demanding responsible sourcing standard. Find out more at www.thisisconcrete.co.uk *from the fifth Concrete Industry Sustainability Performance Report TIC - 46.5 x 262mm:Layout 1 18/09/2012 09:26 Page 1 Gold From to Green INSIDE: Jeb Brugmann on the challenges facing cities of the futureJeb Brugmann on the challenges facing cities of the futureJeb Brugmann on the challenges facing cities of the future Distributed within The Sunday Telegraph, produced and published by Lyonsdown who takes sole responsibility for the contents Sustainable cities
  2. 2. 2 Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013 Opening shots Jeb Brugmann TWENTY years ago urban sustainability was considered an unrealistic fad of local councils responding to green politics. Today,sustainabilityisakeyvaluepropositionintheglobalurban development sector. Its champions reside among the FTSE 100. Thereasonisclear.Urbansustainabilitypracticesdemonstrably improvetheperformanceofurbaninfrastructureandproperties, oneofthelargestcategoriesofwealthonnationalbalancesheets. Momentumbehindtheurbansustainabilityagendaisnowso robust so as to merit another seemingly ‘unrealistic’ assertion: in the not too distant future, cities will function like natural ecosystems, producing large amounts of their own energy, water, food, and perhaps even materials. For centuries we have designed and viewed cities to be colonies of extraction, processing and consumption of nature’s resource wealth. Theydisposedtheirwastes,largelyunaccountable for the impacts. The pace of innovation has been stunning. Twentyyearsago,greencityleaderssuchas Amsterdam,BarcelonaandBostonwere disposing untreated sewage into theircanalsandwaterfronts.In thoseyears,urbansustainability meantend-of-pipesolutionsto treattheresiduesfromnature’s extractedwealth.Then,inthe late 1990s, the focus shifted. Seeking greater economic value from these resources, wasteswerecycledandreused within the urban region. Energy waste supplied district heatingandco-generationsystems. Foodwasteenrichedlocalagricultural soils. Waste water was cascaded from households,toirrigation,toindustrial uses. Demolition wastes from one city, say Hong Kong, were used to construct new cities, such as along China’s eastern seaboard. City management evolved from the management of flows to the management and optimisation of the stocks of extracted natural resources. That was just a start. Today’sleadingcitiesarenowfocusedoncreatingandmanaging their own resource supplies. Cities are developing what scientistscallecologicalfunction,wherebytheyproduce the resources they consume. Thebreakthroughfromstockstosources started with green building. Engineers and design professionals competed to create the world’s most optimsed assets – passive buildings where the occupants are the main source of heat; buildings roofed and skinned with solar panels; properties supplied by their own rainwater collection systems and with no storm water run-off. The commercial results were equally profound. Advanced green buildings had lower operating costs, provided healthier living and work environments, and had more amenities like water features and gardens. The market responded, resoundingly. Now the focus turns to whole ecodistricts, at which scale energy, water, wastewater, and solid waste systems can be more economically optimised together. From the once fringe experimentofLondon’sBedZed,ecodistrictsarenowsprouting across Europe and North America. They define the advancing boundary between ‘unrealistic’ and commercially compelling sustainability.InRotterdam,plansforitsoldStadshavendistrict would see it producing 15 per cent more energy in buildings than the district consumes, 50 per cent more food than local residents consume, and 3 per cent more water than the district itself consumes. Soon we’ll be generating profits and securing premium prices for ecodistrict properties. When that happens, we’ll have discovered an unexpected purpose behind the global rush to cities. We’ll be building a new form of ecosystem that could conceivably support a pending population of nine billion Earthlings. InChina,adozenprojectsforentireecocitiesareonthebooks. Unrealistic? Jeb Brugmann is the author of Welcome to the Urban Revolution: How Cities Are Changing the World Why our cities of the future will function like natural ecosystems See your future in the Crystal Interactive exhibition Meeting and event space Award winning waterfront café 1 Siemens Brothers Way, London, E16 1GB thecrystal.org www.facebook.com/thecrystalorg @thecrystalorg ecosystems, producing large amounts of their own energy, water, food, and perhaps even materials. For centuries we have designed and viewed cities to be colonies of extraction, processing and consumption of nature’s resource wealth. Theydisposedtheirwastes,largelyunaccountable for the impacts. The pace of innovation has Twentyyearsago,greencityleaderssuchas Amsterdam,BarcelonaandBostonwere disposing untreated sewage into theircanalsandwaterfronts.In thoseyears,urbansustainability meantend-of-pipesolutionsto treattheresiduesfromnature’s extractedwealth.Then,inthe Seeking greater economic value from these resources, Energy waste supplied district heatingandco-generationsystems. Foodwasteenrichedlocalagricultural soils. Waste water was cascaded from households,toirrigation,toindustrial uses. Demolition wastes from one city, say Hong Kong, were used to construct new cities, such as along China’s eastern seaboard. City management evolved from the management of flows to the management and optimisation of the stocks of extracted natural resources. That was just a start. Today’sleadingcitiesarenowfocusedoncreatingandmanaging their own resource supplies. Cities are developing what scientistscallecologicalfunction,wherebytheyproduce the resources they consume. Thebreakthroughfromstockstosources started with green building. Engineers assets – passive buildings where the occupants are the main source of heat; buildings roofed and skinned with solar panels; properties supplied by their own rainwater collection systems and with no storm water run-off. The commercial results were equally profound. Advanced green buildings had lower operating costs, provided healthier living and work environments, and had more amenities like water features and natural ecosystems
  3. 3. 3Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 PublisherBradleyScheffer...............................info@lyonsdown.co.uk EditorDanielEvans.............................................dan@lyonsdown.co.uk ProductionEditorAmyDickson..................amy@lyonsdown.co.uk Reporter...............................................................................BonnieGardiner ClientManagerAlexisTrinh.........................alexis@lyonsdown.co.uk ProjectManagerChrisBarclay..............c.barclay@lyonsdown.co.uk “CITIES are where things happen,” says RichardMiller,theheadofsustainability with the UK Technology Strategy Board (TSB). “Cities are becoming more and more importanteconomically,environmentally andsocially.Andascitiesgrowbiggeryou get more pressures, and at the same time you’ve got climate change, waste, and resource shortages. In short, there are loadsofchallengesforcitiesofthefuture.” Indeed,inanincreasinglyurbanworld whereit’spredictedthatthreequartersof the population will live in cities by 2050, sustainabilitycannolongerbeconsidered a mere buzzword for policy makers and businessleaders.Forthesakeofourfuture cities, the concept of sustainability must nowbecomepartofmainstreamthinking. Business has a part to play There are signs this is already occurring; the proportion of managers who say sustainabilityisakeytocompetitivesuccess hasrisenfrom55percentin2010to67per centlastyear,accordingtoresearchbythe MIT Sloan Management Review and the Boston Consulting Group. For a city to be truly sustainable, economies must thrive for the success of businessandemployment,andthequality of life must continually excel in order to retain its popularity. But the solutions to these must be environmentally friendly, with the cost of ecological neglect taking its toll on local flora and fauna. “Howdoweenable9.5bnpeopletolive wellwiththeresourcesofasingleplanet? It’s that balance of people, planet and profit,” says Miller. “We see that as a huge commercial opportunity,andahugechallengeround how you change these things, as they all interact.” Green growth has been imperative to citydevelopmentsinceasearlyasthelate 1960s. America saw the need for a shift away from the “grow first, clean later” approach when the Cuyahoga River in Ohiowassopolluteditcaughtfire,spurring the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency. TSBhaslaunchedaFutureCitiesgroup in London, working as an independent collaborationcentretohelpUKbusinesses develop innovative urban solutions for large scale problems and then commercialisethemonaglobalscale. The groupwillworkcloselywithGlasgowcity council, who recently won £24m of government funding for a future cities demonstrator. Commercial opportunity Though a large challenge exists on the demand side, with the roll out of smart metersandretrofitprogrammesintended toencouragemoresustainableliving,Miller believesamajorcommercialopportunity existsinhelpingpeopledothingstheway they want. “Somepeoplecomeperilouslycloseto saying‘ifwehaddifferentconsumersthese problems would go away’. We have to acknowledgetherealitiesofpeople’slives,” he says. “Peopledonotsetouttowasteenergy, because that costs money. They set out to get what they want, in terms of profits or lifestyle and things like that. So I think that the opportunity for business lies in helpingpeopletoachievewhattheywish in a low impact way.” A perfect example lies in transport, with more people forced to commute by car, due to a lack of infrastructure for Formoreinformationcontactuson 02083494363 oremailinfo@lyonsdown.co.uk With thanks to... WE THINK DIFFERENTLY ABOUT WATER FIND OUT MORE aecom.com/Where+We+Are/Europe/Water By Bonnie Gardiner Main: Richard Miller, head of sustainability at UK Technology Strategy Board Sustainable cities depend on the balance between people, planet and profit walkingandcycling,whileinitiativessuch assmartticketingandreliablelow-emission buses and trains are expected to help aid mobility and ease congestion. Theefficiencyofroadsystemsalsohas a major impact on other sectors like healthcare,withasmuchas20percentof UK road transportation associated with the health system. “Thatcanextendtothewellnessdebate, because if people are healthier, then the strain on the system is less, you’ve got better social outcomes, better economic outcomes, and better environmental outcomes,” says Miller. Business World Don’t miss our brilliant new feature Pages 12 & 13 Business WorldBusiness WorldBusiness WorldBusiness World
  4. 4. Driving toward a zero-carbon future INDUSTRY VIEW S ustainable transport is essential, not just because it can help cities meet their emissions targets, but because in the long term, it will bring cost savings. By 2030 five billion people in the world are expected to live in high density urban areas. Many of those cities are committed to improving air quality, reducing carbon emissions and want to cut fuel costs. That makes cities the most receptive market for hybrid buses. BAESystemshasbeenpowering hybridbusesacrosstheglobeformore thanadecade.Thelatestgeneration ofproductsfromitsHybriDrivebrand benefitfrommanyyears’experience andtechnicalcapabilitydeveloped.But ithasalwaysbeenclearthathybridis notthefinalanswerforurbanmobility. Whilehybrid-poweredbuseshave beenshowntoconsumelessfueland releasefarfewerharmfulemissionsthan astandardbus,theeventualaimhasto beabsolutezerolocalemissionsfrom thevehicle.Thishasthepotentialto radicallyimprovethelivingconditions forthegrowingpercentageoftheglobal populationwholiveindenselypopulated areas.Thechallengetocompanies wishingtomakethisfuturevisionareality istodevelopproductswithclearlydefined andmanagedtechnicalenhancements, whichenablethejourneytoprogress incrementally. Makingquantumleapsin thetransportindustryisrarelyasuccess. Afterall,thisisabusinessrunonfine commercialmargins.Technicalriskisnot somethingthatfitseasilyinthismodel. The key to success therefore is to develop products that work well from day one and offer real benefits to transport operators. These products will generate revenues that can be re-invested in the next generation of products and progress the state-of-the-art toward the goal of all-electric city centre mobility. Hybrid propulsion, in the city bus sector, offers the benefits of reduced fuel consumption and harmful greenhouse gas emissions by up to 35 per cent. www.hybridrive.com ExpertInsight 4 Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013 ZERO EMISSIONS ARE WHAT DRIVE US. …AND SOON THEY’LL DRIVE YOUR PASSENGERS. The BAE Systems HybriDrive® series propulsion system is a leading edge technology, with a record of proven performance and excellence in service. It’s the driving force behind the world’s largest fleets of low carbon buses. We’re now introducing the next stages of the HybriDrive propulsion system story – new evolutions that bring further energy savings along the road to a 100% zero emissions HybriDrive solution. Designed to deliver the zero emissions future of the bus – today. www.hybridrive.com Boris’s low-emission vision Hybrid buses will be a key element of the Mayor of London’s plans for an ultra-low emissions zone. The mayor has asked Transport for London to draw up plans for a public consultation for an ultra-low emission zone to be introduced by 2020, which would see only zero or low emission vehicles driving in central London during working hours. In a statement in February, mayor Boris Johnson said: “Creating the world’s first big city ultra-low emission zone has the potential to be a game changing moment in the quality of life of our great capital. “My vision is a central zone where almost all the vehicles running during working hours are either zero or low emission. This would deliver incredible benefits in air quality and stimulate the delivery and mass use of low emission technology.” said: “Creating the world’s first big of life of our great capital. “My vision is a central zone BAE leading the way – saving money and improving air quality Vehicles equipped with BAE Systems’ HybriDrive propulsion system have travelled more than 600m miles, prevented more than 520,000 tons of CO2 emissions and saved over 38m gallons of diesel fuel to date. HybriDrive propulsion system have travelled more than 600m miles, prevented more than 520,000 tons of CO saved over 38m gallons Hybrid and electric public transport is key to a sustainable city
  5. 5. “To understand the importance of resilience, you just need to look at the stats coming out of the US from the past five to seven years, in terms of the amount of damage to urban infrastructure that they’ve had to withstand as a result of extreme weather events.” Need for collaboration The economic impact of such events is also likely to worsen over time, with a growing number of people urbanising, along with a greater amountofinfrastructureinplace.As such,initiativessuchasClimateWise believe more incentive is needed for the collaboration of policy makers, scientists and private sector investment. “That’safundamentalpartofhow resilienceandsustainabilityneedsto betackledinanurbanenvironment,” says Bartlett. “The public purse has a huge gap right now, so there is going to need to be a real scaling up on investment fromtheprivatesector,andleveraging that investment in developing or redevelopingareaswhichhavemuch more sustainability and resilience built into them.” The same notion is being applied by engineers of smart cities, where all systems are considered and interconnected – internally and externally – in order to deal with a crisis. “Whenyousetupasmartbuilding, you’re collecting a vast array of information including detailed meteringtooptimisewhatyou’reusing from utilities, energy usage and so on,” explains Katherine Farrington, communications and security team leadatengineeringconsultancyfirm Norman Disney & Young. “The ultimate goal would be that this information feeds into smart cities to optimise utilities and planning for education, healthcare, government,transport,economyand the environment.” Farrington cites an emergency scenario as an example where interconnected systems result in greater efficiency. “In a connected city if you had anincidentinthebuilding,youcould call 999 and be able to alert the hospitalwithdetailsoftheperson involved in the incident. With interconnectedsystems,patient informationcouldbeobtained quicklyfromthepatient’slocal surgery, to be available in the ambulance and at the hospital,” she explains. “The hospital can then alert the transport networktosetupallthetrafficlights along the route to be green, to assist theambulancetoreachthepatientand hospital faster – that’s why we want everything to be interconnected.” Investment not enough Private sector investment in roads is animportantaidtoresilienceasrobust or flexible building infrastructure is not always enough. Issues for business in the event of a hurricaneorearthquakecan include road closures and haltedpublictransportlinks, preventingemployeesgetting towork,whilecasualties aremoredifficultfor health services to tend to. “If you rolled solutions up like that, everybody benefits from investment into that infrastructure becoming resilient,” says Bartlett. Utilities too are important in natural disasters, to ensure people are provided with drinking water or heating, though tight regulations meantheyaremoredifficulttocontrol. “It matters to everyone using that servicethattheystayupandrunning, that the grid still runs through the most extreme weather events,” adds Bartlett. The resilience aspect would also have economic benefits for a city, as itservesasanincentiveforcompanies to move there, where risks are managed and reduced, while more areas are insurable – an attractive option to businesses struggling with high premiums. Withthedemandforan80percent reductionincarbonemissionsby2050, buildingsnowneedtooptimisetheir internal energy and utilities usage. “The way the progression of buildings and systems has always been,allcommunicationsandcontrol systemswereinstalledascompletely separate systems that often used different protocols, nothing would talk to each other, and if they did it was really complicated and slow,” says Farrington. “What we design now are fully integrated buildings which have a common infrastructure, common backbonenetwork,commonnetwork interface, providing sustainable, economicandoperationalbenefits.” Future of integration With the introduction of an Energy EfficientEthernet(EEE),new,smarter programmes monitor and regulate anything on an IP network, such as putting an unused computer, email servers or telephone to sleep. Advanced lighting systems can controllightrightdowntosomeone’s location in the building; metering and sub metering is employed to measureuseofutilities,andbuilding security is improving to prevent internalcrises,asvirtualisationshifts disparatesystemsontoonecentralised energy efficient platform. Combined heat and power (CHP) plants are serving as a sophisticated alternative to coal and gas-fired power stations to provide local heat, electricity and cooling. This approach has been adopted by some of the UK’s most notable buildings, London’s Olympic venues, left, and the surrounding complexes and homes, some of which have achieved a BREEAM excellent rating. C H P g e n e r a t e s electricity while also capturing usable heat produced in this process. Thiscontrastswithconventional methodsofgeneratingpowerwhereup totwothirdsoftotalenergyconsumed iswasted.TheCHPprocessisalsofuel neutral,meaningitcanbeappliedto both renewable and fossil fuels. Despite great progress, cities are only at the beginning of their sustainabilityjourneys,withcurrent plans not enough compared to real, tangible action. The efforts by engineers and policy makers to create intelligent andresilientinfrastructurewillonly berealisedwiththecollaborationand investmentnecessary,sothatcitiescan better endure emergency scenarios, as well as help to prevent them. 5Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 E XPERTSareclaimingthatif citiesdon’thavearesilient integrated approach to theiroverallinfrastructurethen sustainability “is a dream that will never be realised”. “Sustainabilityandresilience can be seen as two sides of the same coin,” says Nicolette Bartlett, senior programme manager for the University of Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership, which runs platforms such as ClimateWise, an international insurancebodyforclimaterisk. Built on resilience By Bonnie Gardiner Anexpertlookat howourfuture willbeconnected, integratedand trulysustainable Bartlett: sustainability and resilience are two sides of the same coin solutions up like that, everybody benefits from investment into that infrastructure becoming Utilities too are important in the surrounding complexes and homes, some of which have achieved a BREEAM excellent rating. electricity while also capturing usable heat produced in this process. Thiscontrastswithconventional trulysustainabletrulysustainabletrulysustainable
  6. 6. ‘Key to sustainable cities is embracing clean cloud’ AS smart cities grow, the amount of data gathered, stored, and analysed is set to explode–andhowweprocessthisdatawill play a big role in the future of efficiency and sustainability. Whileproponentsofthecloudoftenrave aboutitsenvironmentalbenefitscompared with in-house data storage, businesses shouldstillbevigilantwhendecidingwho willhosttheirdata.ITdepartmentsshould bechallengingtheircloudproviders’green credentialsinordertosecureasustainable future,accordingtoGreenpeace’sheadof IT, Andrew Hatton, below. The IT expert says that asking these “bigquestions”willencouragecompanies to go green and make data storage more environmentally friendly. “I think, historically, many businesseshaveapproachedthecloud from a cost-saving objective – and that’sunderstandableinthecurrent climate. “But we want to see organisations starting to ask big environmental questions of cloud providers.” The beginnings of green accountability are there, he says, adding thatthetechnologyisalreadymovinginthe rightdirectionandtowardssustainability. Greenpeace publishes reports to assist companies in choosing sustainable providers, and Hatton would like to see morebusinessespromotinggreenprocesses in future.But, unlike some initiatives, environmentally-friendlyITcanalsoyield financial results for firms in financially uncertain times. “Therearebigpotentialsavingsinterms of both money and CO2 in running things alonggreenerlines,runningthingsmore efficientlyandusingsmartertechnologies toreducetravelandrunsmarterlogistics operations,” says Hatton. “Forexample,byusingservicessuchas videoconferencingwereducetravel,and that has an impact in terms of the load on the infrastructure and transport systems of towns and cities.” This means savings on energy consumptionandpollution,andwith staffabletoworkfromhomeonline, Hattonpredictsthatinthefuturewe may see “lighter” offices with fewer staff having to travel on overcrowded trains. ButforHatton,therealkeytothefutureof sustainablecitiesisforgreentechnologies to embrace a clean cloud. He says: “It’s vital that the growth in cloud is not at the expense of our climate, andweavoidtheuseofcoaltopowerthese data centres. Otherwise we are simply swapping one problem for another.” Wind farm is second largest in the world LAST month the UK saw the opening of the world’s second largestoffshorewindfarm,off the coast of Suffolk. The £1.3bn Greater Gabbard project, made up of 140 turbines, was jointly developed by SSE renewables and RWE npower renewables and will be providing 14 per cent of the UK’s offshore wind power capacity, delivering enough power to the grid for 415,000 homes. Energy and Business Minister Michael Fallon hailed the project as further evidence of the government’s commitment to the fast- expanding offshore wind industry, claiming it had already delivered substantial economic benefits to the region. Insulation is being left out in the cold INSULATIONprojectstoreduce domesticcarbonemissionshave been met with resistance due to their invasive nature, says a sustainability academic. Peter Guthrie, director of the Centre for Sustainable DevelopmentattheUniversity of Cambridge, says thermal insulation is not popular with residents, despite the high returnoninvestmentsandshort payback period. “Therehasbeenahighlevel ofresistancebecausepeople don’twanttotheintrusionof tradespeoplecomingtodothe work,”explainsGuthrie. Thermal insulation for many either has to be internal, which reduces the size of the rooms, or external, which affects the appearance of the building, “More work needs to be done on the social attitudes and the behavioural approaches in terms of retrofitting,” says Guthrie. “Persuading people to take these decisions is proving to be much more intractable than originally thought.” By Matt Smith ExpertInsight Why Part L is still Plan A for us INDUSTRY VIEW P art L has long been the focal point for the UK housing industry. A complex series of strict targets, Part L offered a robust structure for the construction industry to work to as it sets its sights on achieving the golden standard of having zero- carbon new-build housing by 2016. The new Part L regulations will call for new build homes to be 6 per cent more efficient. More significantly, it shifts the focus on to improving building materials and developing a fabric-first approach to building design. This seems to be a positive move towards what we in the construction products sector have always known – that the key to zero- carbon housing is sympathetic building design which maximises the inherent properties of construction materials.  Moving the goalposts Despitebeinginitiallyconsultedon inJanuary2012,thegovernment’s responsetothenextstageofchanges toPartLhadlongbeendelayed.When theupdatewasreceivedattheendof July,thegoalpostshadmovedquite considerably,leavingmanywondering whetherPartLwastheguidinglightthey hadpreviouslybelievedittobe.Some industryfigureshavewarnedthatthe watered-downtargetsandresultingdelay inimplementationuntilApril2014could threatenviabilityofthe2016goal,butfor thosealreadyproactivelyworkingtowards thisdeadline,willitmakeadifference? Concretehaslongrewrittenthe rulebookforsustainableconstruction inthehousingsector,having beenusedinsomeofthemost groundbreakinggreenbuilding developmentsthattheUKhasseen.  It’samaterialthathasalreadyproven tobeabletoenhanceabuilding’s sustainabilitycredentials.In2009we workedwithDrJerryHarrallofSEArch ArchitectstocreateUnityGardens–a socialhousingdevelopmentofsix affordable,concrete-builthomeswiththe aimofgeneratingmoreenergythanthey use.Thepropertiesnotonlymetthese objectives,buttheyachievedthehighest recordedstandardassessmentprocedure (SAP)ratings,andwereconfirmedasbeing themostenergy-efficienthomesintheUK byanindependentenvironmentalaudit. Oneofthereasonsforthissuccess isbecausethebasicdesignreliedsolely onnaturalresourcessuchassunlight. South-facingglasswallsmaximisedthe thermalmassefficiencyoftheconcrete structures,making centralheating unnecessary. CombinethiswithPV panelsandwind-generatedelectricity, and forthefouryears sincemoving in,residentshaveenjoyedanear- autonomousexistenceintermsoffuel.  Look beyond 2016 This resurgence in innovation means that the industry is well placed to deliver upon 2016 targets, and the furore over changes to Part L seems somewhat shortsighted. What we as an industry need to do is consider a future beyond 2016, innovating with longevity in mind. Of course, it’s good to have targets, but with the gauntlet of an 80 per cent carbon reduction by 2050 still ahead of us, getting bogged down in the finer details of Part L 2014 could be simply wasting time when we should be joining together to concentrate on the bigger picture. Emma Hines is senior manager of sustainable construction at Lafarge Tarmac sustainablecities@lafargetarmac.com www.lafargetarmac.com The industry is still on track for 2016 targets, says Emma Hines of Lafarge Tarmac ‘Avoid using coal to power data centres’ 6 Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013 The Unity Gardens project created the most energy efficient homes in the UK “I think, historically, many businesseshaveapproachedthecloud from a cost-saving objective – and that’sunderstandableinthecurrent “But we want to see organisations starting to ask big environmental questions of cloud providers.” The beginnings of green the infrastructure and transport systemsthe infrastructure and transport systems of towns and cities.” This means savings on energy consumptionandpollution,andwith staffabletoworkfromhomeonline, Hattonpredictsthatinthefuturewe “I think, historically, many businesseshaveapproachedthecloud from a cost-saving objective – and that’sunderstandableinthecurrent “But we want to see organisations starting to ask big environmental questions of cloud providers.” The beginnings of green the infrastructure and transport systems of towns and cities.” This means savings on energy consumptionandpollution,andwith staffabletoworkfromhomeonline, Hattonpredictsthatinthefuturewe FindouthowyourITdepartmentcanhelpmakeyourbusinessmoreenvironmentally friendlyatITTransformation2013,whereAndrewHattonwillbespeaking,atthe BritishMuseumonNovember26.Visit www.it-transformation.co.uk
  7. 7. ExpertInsight Solutions for a more efficient tomorrow Heat pumps are a cost effective and safe alternative to heating INDUSTRY VIEW W ith cities becoming increasingly densely populated and the associated energy demand growing, the issue of dwindling fossil fuel supplies is raising more and more discussion about how homes and commercial properties will be heated in the future. However, an innovative and sustainable solution is already available right before our eyes – in the air around us and the ground below. Heat pumps are a proven method of heating in the UK and abroad. They extract heat from the air or the ground to provide a total heating and hot water solution for any property. With vastly superior efficiencies compared with fossil fuel systems and with no combustible gases, they are safer and more cost-effective to run. Reductioninemissions Retrofitting heat pumps in our cities, whether via boreholes for single or multiple properties or by installing air source units can also achieve substantial carbon emission reductions. It’s simply a case of people recognising the considerable benefits of these systems and incorporating them within current and future development plans. One initiative that will boost this recognition is the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). The commercial variant already rewards businesses with payments for the heat their systems generate, while the domestic RHI launches in 2014. This is a defining moment in history where an entire country is being incentivised to fundamentally change the way they heat their homes and businesses. With just a small amount of capital and the benefit of ongoing RHI payments, it is now possible to achieve zero carbon energy solutions at zero cost. Powerinour hands Renewable energy has the power to remove the burden of fuel concerns from future generations and thwart the onset of fuel poverty among vulnerable social groups. Forward-thinking individuals and businesses have that power in their hands and now is the time to use it. 0808 145 2340 www.iceenergy.co.uk ENVIRONMENTAL organisations are opposingplansforairportexpansionsin the UK, claiming that it is unsustainable and unnecessary. As the debate continues over how to improve capacity at airports in London, environmental organisation Friends of theEarthsaysthattheconceptis“nothing more than a political football”. “Wedon’tthinkthatthebusinesscase for expansion is being made robustly enough,” says Jane Thomas, senior campaigner for Friends of the Earth. “Thisstuffisbeingkickedaroundlike apoliticalfootball.Alotofthisispolitical posturing,andthatcoststhecommunities andtheenvironmentahugeamount,sowe urgepoliticianstobeverymindfulofthat.” Thestressinresponsetodecreasingair travelforbusinessreasonsisnottakinginto accountthedifferentwaysinwhichpeople can conduct business, insists Thomas. “At the moment we are still the destination of choice. Business traffic is falling, but it’s because people are using video conferences; executives aren’t needed to jet around the world. People are doing business differently and this new model hasn’t been factored in.” Thomasalsonotesthatmanyregional companies conduct their business in Europe, where air travel is unnecessary with services such as Eurostar and the upcoming completion of HS2. A n alternative suggestion to free up airport capacity would be to scrap short-haul flights around the UK, for which there are already adequate alternatives. “It’s ridiculous in Heathrow there are flightstoManchester,LeedsandScotland,” says Thomas. “You’ve got runways that are used for long-haul destinations that take on short-haul flights and that’s why the capacityatHeathrowis97percent;poor usage of runway.” London mayor Boris Johnson has long rallied for a new hub airport to be built in the Thamesestuary,despite similarproposalsbeing rejectedsince1943 on economic and environmental grounds. I n M ay, t he Commons Transport Committeesaidthatthe “Boris Island” and other estuaryairportproposalswouldbehugely expensive,couldharmwildlifeandmean the closure of Heathrow. The committee and the majority of airlines are in favour of building a third runway at Heathrow, while some would preferexpansionofGatwickorStansted. Aviationisexpectedtoaccountforone quarter of the UK’s total greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The RSPB, WWF UK and Heathrow campaign group HACAN submitted a report to the government, in which CE Delft found that once a city reaches a certainlevelof“connectedness”,further expansionisunlikelytosignificantlyaffect the economy. Thegovernment’sairportcommission, headedbyLordDavies,hasbeensetupto examine aviation capacity and the need for expansion in greater detail, and will produce its final recommendations in a report to be published in 2015. Shipping industry is steering on to a greener path THE shipping industry is working towards a greener future with new environmentallyconsciousinvestments. Despite the lack of a global emissions deal,thegrowingcarbonfootprintofthe industryhasledmanycompaniestoseek a more sustainable business strategy. The sector currently accounts for around 3 per cent of global emissions, and is expected to more than double its output by 2050 if no action is taken. The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has introduced a series of efficiency measures to cut emissions by 23 per cent by 2030, but hasadmittedmoresolutionsarerequired. Suggestionsforaglobalmarket-based mechanism include a tax on bunker fuel or an emissions trading scheme. Rules have also been brought in to restrict sulphur and nitrogen oxide emissions. Meanwhile,inAmsterdam,theShipto Gridprojectwillallowrivercruisersand inland cargo vessels to connect to green energywiththehelpofalmost200newly installed onshore power stations. Activists give red light to airport growth By Bonnie Gardiner RHI payments, it is now possible to achieve zero carbon energy solutions at zero cost. Powerinour Renewable energy has the power to of fuel concerns generations and thwart the onset of fuel poverty among Heat pumps are a safe and cost- effective way to get energy 7Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 companies conduct their business in Europe, where air travel is unnecessary with services such as Eurostar and the upcoming completion of HS2. A n alternative suggestion to free up airport capacity would be to scrap short-haul flights around the UK, London mayor Boris Johnson has long rallied for a new hub airport to be built in the Thamesestuary,despite similarproposalsbeing rejectedsince1943 on economic and environmental grounds. I n M ay, t he Commons Transport Committeesaidthatthe “Boris Island” and other companies conduct their business in Europe, where air travel is unnecessary with services such as Eurostar and the upcoming completion of HS2. A n alternative suggestion to free around the UK, London mayor Boris Johnson has long rallied for a new hub airport to be built in the Thamesestuary,despite similarproposalsbeing rejectedsince1943 Commons Transport Committeesaidthatthe “Boris Island” and other Johnson: keen to build a new hub airport
  8. 8. ALMOSTtenyearsafterAthenshosted theOlympicGames,thegloryofmedals, adrenalineandstrikinginfrastructure burnsonlyasadistantmemoryforthe people of Greece. Almost all venues lie abandoned, while the crumbling stadium houses broken chairs and a torn running track. As the Greek economydeteriorates,theimportance offorwardthinkinggoesundisputed. FollowingBeijing’sinspiringmega- event of 2008, all eyes fell on a patch oflandineastLondon,whereourown OlympicParkbegantotakeshape.But asChina’svenuesslowlyfadedintothe background – not well maintained andusedmostlybytourists–theword on the British streets was not simply sportingglory,butofOlympiclegacy. “We said from the very beginning therewouldbenowhiteelephantson thepark–andwe’vekeptourpromise,” says Dennis Hone, chief executive of the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC). “Wesaidwe’dtransformwasteland in east London into one of Europe’s largestparksfilledwithaward-winning sports venues that people will love, and we delivered,” he adds. “We remain firmly on track to deliver a meaningfulphysicalandsociallegacy for Londoners.” Just over a year since London 2012, I can see myself that the park’s reconstruction is well underway as I trek across various work sites. Accompaniedbyvariousconstruction workersandprojectmanagers,liaising over colour samples and admiring newly built bridges, I can see the foundations being laid for 10 tennis courts,amountainbikingcourseand two hockey pitches. “Different countries have done differentparkswell,butBarcelonadid quiteagoodjobwithregeneration,and Sydney too,” says Jessica Gavaghan, project manager for the Legacy Corporation and my site chaperone fortheday.“We’vetriedtobringitall together,tohavealegacyforthevenues, but also the park, and the village.” The lesson from former host cities left crippled from the effects of the Olympicsensuredthatrightfromthe start, LLDC would take heed of past mistakes and work with a legacy at the forefront of their plans. “Thiswasalldesignedforthelegacy, but we made it work for the Games – anditworkedreallywell.So nowour job is converting; there’s still a lot to Bonnie Gardiner takes a tour of the Games venues to see how sustainability is coming out on top 8 Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013 A legacy that will la long after Games glory fades
  9. 9. Main: an artist’s impression of how a nearby neighbourhood might look, with Olympic venues to the right Below: construction takes place on site Bottom: A music event makes use of the Olympic Park do but we have a really good place to start from,” says Gavaghan. Looking to the north, the work is already complete, with the recently opened Copper Box Arena playing host to several events since July. The green and pristine community spacesees people comingfrom miles aroundtoenjoywalkingandcycling, orrelaxingintheUnityKitchenCafé, whilechildrenlaughintheTumbling Bayadventureplayground.Oneof29 playgroundstobeerectedinthepark, TumblingBayisspeciallydesignedto blend into its natural surroundings, withatreetrunkplayground,sandpit, ropes course and waterpark. A perimeter wall restricts access to construction spaces to the south, displaying details of venue refurbishment so people are up to date on the park plans. A distant hammering can be heard, and the occasional worker in a hard hat and high-visibilityvestappearswithtools, but people seem unperturbed by the on-going work. “Ithinkpeopleunderstandthatit’sa bigjobandit’snotgoingtobefinished overnight.They’rejusthappytocome and see what’s going on, how things areprogressing,andhopefullythey’ll continue to come,” adds Gavaghan. Overall, around £300m will be spent on transforming all 560 acres of Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, whileconstructionhasalreadycreated morethanathousandjobs,including 60apprenticeships,with8,000more permanentrolestobecreatedby2030. Inafewmonthsnewresidentswill moveintothe2,818homesonwhatwas oncetheAthletes’Village,aswellasa further7,000newhomesinfivenew neighbourhoods,completewithnine nurseries and three health centres. The completed park will offer sportingprogrammesforeverything fromhighperformancecompetitions tograssrootscompetitions,nodoubt includingschoolsportingevents,with three schools expected to be built overtheparkinthecoming years,includingtheopening of Chobham Academy this September. As tumbleweed rolls through the dilapidated Athensstadium,thefutureof alleightofLondon’sOlympic venues was secured by May 2013,followingthesigningofa dealwithiCITYforthePressand BroadcastCentre.Justamonth earliersawtheOlympicStadium confirmedasthefuturehomefor theRugbyWorldCup,followed byPremiershipsideWestHamUnited and UK Athletics. This puts London further ahead than any other host city in history in delivering a lasting legacy from the Games, while a schedule of summer entertainmentandeventswillcontinue 9Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 Most sustainable cities are also most desirable to live in ITwasin2008that,forthefirsttimeinhistory,humankind becameanurbanspecies.TheUNreportedthatbytheend oftheyearamajorityoftheworld’s6.7bnpeoplewouldbe city-dwellers. Moreover, the urbanisation trend that has dominatedforseveralcenturiesiscontinuing,withanalysts predicting that by 2050, 6.4bn out of a global population of 9.2bn will live in cities. Whetherthisisablessingoracursedependsonwhichcity youlivein.Wellmanagedcitiesarecruciblesforinnovation and engagement that provide citizens with richly varied and rewarding lives. In addition, experts believe mega- citiescouldholdtheanswertotheworld’senvironmental challengesbyconcentratingpopulationefficientlyinareas thatcanthenbesupportedbysurroundingagriculturalland or perhaps even sky-scraper farms and rooftop gardens. Poorlymanagedcitiesremainsomeofthebleakestplaces ontheplanet,marredbypoverty,poorhealth,andcrime.It isadichotomythatmakesthedevelopmentofsustainable citiesoneofthemostimportantlongtermchallengesfaced by political and business leaders the world over. Every few months it seems a new list is published highlighting the “world’s greenest cities” and while it maybeimpossibletodeveloptrulycomprehensivecriteria formeasuringthegreennessofametropolis,itisclearthat manyoftheworld’sgreenestcitiesarealsotheworld’smost liveableandattractivecities.WhetheritisNewYorkwithits walkableneighbourhoodsandlowlevelsofcarownership, LondonwithitshugegreenspacesandBorisBikes,below, orVancouverwithits55percentrecyclingrateandreliance oncleanhydroelectricity,thegreenestneighbourhoodsin the world are also some of the most desirable. This trend will continue as new clean technologies are embraced. In cities, electric cars are already providing a clean and cost effective means of tackling deadly air pollution. Electric scooters delivering your pizza are now a common sight in New York, while Taiwan is working on plans to roll out 5,000 electric rubbish trucks. Similarly, energy efficient upgrades and renewable energy installations such as solar panels and district heat networksmayrequireupfrontinvestment,butthepayback is far quicker in densely populated neighbourhoods. All these benefits are apparent in ambitious plans for futuristic green cities such as the Masdar project in Abu DhabiortheLivingPlanITValleysmartcitydevelopmentin Portugal,whererenewables,publictransport,andbuilding andtransportmanagementsystemsareintegratedtoslash emissions and environmental impacts. Planners now envisage cities where buildings automatically deliver the right temperature, driverless carsferrypeoplearoundwithzeroriskofaccidents,while allthetimethecitydrawonnegligibleamountsofenergy. Weneedsustainablecitiesandweneedtobuildthemfast. Butthankfullythesesustainable cities are just the kind of cities people like to live in. By James MurrayBy James Murray ‘By2050,6.4bnoutofaglobal populationof9.2bnwillliveincities’ VIEW untiltherestoftheparkopensitsdoors to the community in spring 2014. The Stratford environment is set to prosper also, with each venue functioning on green energy as well asaregenerationofthesurrounding natural habitats. With 252 acres of open space and 6.5km of rivers and canals,variouswildlifehavebegunto reappearintheparksincetheGames, and will continue to do so with an expected 111 acres of biodiverse habitats including reed beds, grasslands, ponds and woodlands. InternationalOlympicCommittee presidentJacquesRoggesays:“London hasraisedthebaronhowtodelivera lastinglegacy.Ithascreatedalegacy blueprint for future Games hosts.” And, so far, the outlook is positive for Rio 2016. The Rio organising committee is promising its own legacy will be born from “passion and transformation of a city and an entire country, fuelled by the renovation of the Olympic and Paralympic spirit.” But as we’ve seen in the past, promises don’t always equal a reality. Gavaghan of the Legacy Corporation stresses that: “As successful as London has been, Rio needs to adapt to its own unique situationsandthinkaboutwhatthey needtoimproveintheircityandwhat benefits they can get.” ast three schools expected to be built overtheparkinthecoming years,includingtheopening of Chobham Academy this As tumbleweed rolls through the dilapidated Athensstadium,thefutureof alleightofLondon’sOlympic venues was secured by May presidentJacquesRoggesays:“London hasraisedthebaronhowtodelivera lastinglegacy.Ithascreatedalegacy blueprint for future Games hosts.” And, so far, the outlook is positive for Rio 2016. 2013,followingthesigningofa dealwithiCITYforthePressand BroadcastCentre.Justamonth confirmedasthefuturehomefor theRugbyWorldCup,followed byPremiershipsideWestHamUnited The Rio organising committee is promising its own legacy will be born from “passion and transformation of a city and an entire country, fuelled by the renovation of the Olympic and Paralympic spirit.” past, promises don’t always equal a reality. Gavaghan of the EXPERT James Murray is the founding editor of BusinessGreen.com He tweets @James_BG
  10. 10. ExpertInsight A ccording to the UK Green Building Council, by 2050, 75 per cent of the world’s population is expected to live in cities. The built environment already accounts for up to 20 per cent of water use, 40 per cent of energy consumption and approaching 50 per cent of natural resource use, as well as two-thirds of C02 emissions. So,withnewinfrastructure andconstructioncomesahuge responsibility–andanincredible opportunity–tominimisethe impactofthecitiesoftomorrow. Butit’snotjustnewbuildsthatcan makeadifference.In2050, 80percentofallbuildingsstanding todaywillstillbeoccupied. “Wehavetorampupoureffortsas anindustrytodrivegreensolutionsif wearegoingtomeetthegovernment’s targetof80percentreductioninCO2 emissionsby2050,”saysSkanska’s presidentandchiefexecutive,Mike Putnam,whoisalsoco-chairofthe government’sGreenConstructionBoard. Todaymanydevelopersconcentrate onbuildingonepropertyandmeeting minimumenvironmental requirements,butwe needtothinkwider thanthatduring development, Putnambelieves.He supportsgreater collaboration: “Weneedtowork withgovernment, thesupplychain andcompetitorsto drivesustainable construction.” Heseescollaborations, suchastheSkanska- founded,industry- wideSupplyChain SustainabilitySchool asthewayforward. Initsfirstyear,theschoolattracted 2,400membersand1,300companies, alleagertoboosttheirgreencredentials andmeettheirclients’aspirationsto future-prooftheirdevelopments. TheJourneytoDeepGreen Today’sconstructionisaboutreducing theuseofcarbon,energyandwaterand sourcingsustainablematerials.Some mightbelievethatabuildingwith zeronetenergyusage–nomore energybills–isapipedream,but constructionfirmshavealready builtsuccessfulexamples. “Ibelievethatconstruction withnear-zeroimpactonthe environmentisrealistic.Self-sufficient buildingsthatgeneratetheirown power–andarebuiltandmaintained withnonetimpactontheenvironment –arethefuture,”saysPutnam. Constructionprojectsfocuson reduction,reuseandrecycling–thesame mantraweuseathome–becausethere isachargeforthewastesenttolandfill. Oninfrastructureprojects,suchas wideningtheM25,theSkanskaBalfour Beattyjointventurehasworkedwiththe HighwaysAgencytodriveoutwaste. Morethan2.2msqmetresofmaterials excavatedwererecycled,withmorethan 97percentofwastedivertedfromlandfill. Today’sbuildingscanbepowered byrenewableenergy,including geothermalsources,biomass,windand solarpower.JustoutsideHelsingborg inSweden,Skanska’slargestgreen officedevelopmentsofar–Väla Gård–isproducingatleastasmuch energyasitconsumesforheating, coolingandbuildingutilities. Andit’snotjustoverseasthatprogress isbeingmade.Therecentlycompleted BrentCivicCentreinNorthLondon issoontobenamedtheUK’sgreenest publicbuilding.BrentCouncilhadhigh aspirationsforitsnewhome.Working withSkanska,itsnewpremisesare settoachievea33percentreduction incarbonemissionswithanA-rated energyperformancecertificate. Incitiesofthefuture,withtheright technology,buildingscanchannel moreenergybacktotheNational Gridthantheydrawdown. Thecaseforgreen Therearegoodexamplesofhow constructioncompanieshaveintroduced sustainableideasandtechnology, butthereremainsaperception bysomethatbuilding‘green’ ismoreexpensive. That’swhy,forcompanies likeSkanska–anditscustomers –itisimportanttofocusonthe businesscaseforsustainablebuilding. Lowerrunningcostsareclearly attractiveforassetownersandtenants, butinitialinvestmentcanbeabarrier. Forconstructioncompanies,the challengehereisasmuchoneof educationastechnicalknow-how. Particularlyongreenretrofitprojects,a well-informedapproachcanmeanthere isnocapitaloutlayforthebuyer.Payback periods,feed-intariffsandgovernment incentivesareallwaystoreduceorremove thestingofamajorcapitalinvestment. A£1.4minvestmentatSkanska’shead officeinHertfordshirehascutenergy costsby£145,000ayear,andreduced carbonbyhalf.Theinvestmentis expectedtopayforitselfwithinnineyears. Peoplepower Switchingtorenewablesources ispointless,though,ifenergy usageisstillhigh,soreducing consumptionisequallyimportant. Smartercitieswillbethosethat considernotjusttheconstructionphase, butalsohowwedesignandemploy technology–andshifthumanbehaviour –torunthosecitiesmoreefficiently. Greeninfrastructureandbuildings delivertheirfullpotentialonly whenthepeoplewhousethemdo socorrectly.Thenatureofgreen technologymeansusershaveamajor influenceontheireffectiveness. Behaviouralchangehasbecomean importantpartofdeliveringsmarter buildings.AtthreeLondonhospitals– StBartholomew’s,TheLondonChest HospitalandTheRoyalLondon– Skanska’sfacilitiesmanagementteam auditsthewastebinseverysixweeks. Bymakingsurehospitalstaffmembers puttherightkindofwasteintotheright bins,thehospitalshavereachedthepoint wheretheynowsendzeronon-clinical wastetolandfill.They’vealsocutthecost of‘offensive’wastedisposal[low-level clinicalwaste]by£250,000inthefirstyear. So,smartercitiesneedsmarterpeople. Twitter: @skanskaukplc www.skanska.co.uk 10 Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013 onbuildingonepropertyandmeeting minimumenvironmental requirements,butwe needtothinkwider thanthatduring development, Putnambelieves.He supportsgreater collaboration: “Weneedtowork withgovernment, thesupplychain andcompetitorsto drivesustainable construction.” Heseescollaborations, suchastheSkanska- founded,industry- wideSupplyChain SustainabilitySchool asthewayforward. The business case for building smarter cities By supporting the green agenda in building and infrastructure projects, the construction industry is helping the UK understand the benefits of building cities that are smarter and more sustainable INDUSTRY VIEW Leading by example Pushingthegreenagendaiseasierif youcanproveitworks.Putnamargues thatcompaniesshouldsetthetone bytakingtheleadongreenissues. Backin2009,Skanskatookthebold decisiontochangeits1,200-strong carfleettolow-emissionvehicles. Atthattimetherewereonlyasmall numberofcarsonthemarketthat metitsambitiousstandard. TheaverageCO₂emissionsfora newcartodayintheUKis133CO₂/ km.Skanska’scarfleetwasachieving thistwoyearsago.Themovecut Skanska’sfuelcostsby£1.1m. Thecompanyhasalsoconverted itsentirefleetofheavyplanttobe poweredbybiodegradableoils, aheadofanylegislativenecessity. “Weliketotakealeadershipposition andpushthisagendaforward,”says Putnam.“We’retryingtofindinnovative solutionsandpushtheboundaries. It’simportanttodowhatyousay,but alsotofocusoncollaborationandtake awideapproachtobeinggreen.” sourcingsustainablematerials.Some mightbelievethatabuildingwith energybills–isapipedream,but environmentisrealistic.Self-sufficient constructioncompanieshaveintroduced sustainableideasandtechnology, butthereremainsaperception bysomethatbuilding‘green’ ismoreexpensive. likeSkanska–anditscustomers –itisimportanttofocusonthe businesscaseforsustainablebuilding. Below: Mike Putnam, Skanska president and chief executive
  11. 11. I ndustry is beginning to recognise the important contribution of engineers who understand precisely how a building’s external surfaces can help moderate energy use. The façade of a modern building is fast becoming one of the most expensive and important elements of building construction; representing up to 35 per cent of construction costs. Façades are a creative expression of the architect as well the primary environmental modifier, significantly influencing internal conditions, energy use and comfort. We all understand that insulation is important to prevent heat loss from a building, but this is not a general rule that applies to all constructions. Some buildings that have dominant air conditioning energy use might not necessarily benefit from very high levels ofinsulationwhencoolexternalweather conditions might actually help depress warm internal temperatures. In the future, building façades will need to be far more adaptive so that they work in the same way that the consumer might remove a coat and add sunglasses on a hot day. Clearly, we have the ability to open and close windows for ventilation purposes, but varying levels of insulation and window transparency will be required to further optimise building energy use. Speciallytrainedengineers Façade engineering is a relatively new science, embracing the need to design and understand how building façades contribute to energy in use so that optimum forms of construction can be achieved with certainty. This requires specifically trained façade engineers. The Society of Façade Engineering in London defines the science as ‘the art of resolving aesthetic, environmental and structural issues to achieve the enclosure of habitable space.’ The technical design and execution of sustainable buildings now requires properly skilled and talented engineers as part of a holistic design approach to inform this part of a building’s construction in any properly sustainable building. Chris Macey is chief executive of Wintech Façade Engineers 01902 307430 www.wintech-group.co.uk S ustainability is great for government and industry to aspire to, but the improved economy and quality of life can’t be fully enjoyed by residents who don’t live past middle age. The growing health issues of British people is spurred greatly from an over reliance on un- healthy foods, causing sustain- able living projects to spring up in various communities. Social ventures in Manchester and Stoke are improving employ- ment and access to healthier food optionsbyteachingpeoplehowto farm and sell local produce. Manchester has benefited from an incubator project for new organic farmers called Form Start, with new grow- ers harvesting their first crops in July; while further south the Urbivore initiative gives school children the chance to learn a trade that would offer employ- ment in agriculture and cater- ing, while boosting the health of local communities by selling locally grown, affordable fruits and vegetables, all of which can help cure Stoke of its “sick city” status. The Sustainable Food Cit- ies Network says good food is a positive vehicle for dealing with some of today’s most pressing social, economic and environ- mental problems, including diet- related ill-health to food poverty and waste, not to mention cli- mate change and biodiversity loss to social dislocation. Car sharing scheme a hit in Amsterdam Addedtothelistof interestingDutch developments,Dogberry hearsthey’vecomeup withanewwaytocontrol transportissuesforthe peopleofAmsterdam. WeGoCarSharingisa peer-to-peercarsharing platformthatallows peoplewithoutcarsto rentthemfrompeoplein theneighbourhoodviaa speciallydesignedapp. Thetechnology,which trackswhoisdriving whatvehicle,andhow far,isdesignedtohelp ownersandrenters managereservations andhandlepayments. Theresulthelpscompanies inneedofmobilitytosaveon costs,andpresumablydecreases crowdingonpublictransport, whilepeoplearealsomore inclinedtopurchasecarsif theycanexploitthisschemeto generatemorerevenue. The density of cities is at the heart of many sustainabil- ity challenges such as conges- tion, carbon emissions, and a lack of suitable transport and infrastructure. But without the number of active residents, the city wouldn’tworknearlyaswell. The more people that are squeezed into an area, the moreservicesthatareawillbe able to sustain, with smaller towns often not able to jus- tify services such as night buses, 24-hour shops and res- taurants.YetinLondon,these are typically within walking distance. Cities will only continue to attract people, while those additional residents become customers, spurring more business, competition, and a greaterdriveforinnovation. ResearchbyEY(formallyErnst&Young)has liftedsomespiritsinthecleantechnology sector,revealingthatglobally,theyhave seengrowthof18percentthisyear. Cleanenergycompaniesareresponding toaglobalshiftinperspective,with particularlystrongdemandforenhanced energyefficiencyintheAsian-Pacific region,whileChinaandtheUSleadthe worldincleantechnologyfirms. Thenumberofindividualfirmshasalso beenseentoincreasegloballyasmore businessfolkaresettocapitaliseontheshift. Listedrenewableenergyfirmsincreased 14percent,withmarketcapitalisation increasing8percent,andreported revenuesrising23percent. Meanwhile,sourcessuchaswindand solarmightseemixedresultsasthedebates rageonabouttheirtrueeffectiveness. ByMattSmith,webadministrator u Editor’s pick WWF UK - Green Business bit.ly/1bVHJZQ Deloitte Sustainable Business blogs.deloitte.com/greenbusiness If you’re looking for insight and tips on sustainable business, where better to start than the World Wildlife Fund’s UK blog? While the Green Business section provides a starting point, be sure to explore the rest of the site for inspirational ideas from beyond the business world that could be adapted to use within your policy. From packaging to supply chains and efficiency to corporate responsibility, Deloitte’s sustainable business blog’s covers all areas of green company policy, with insights from key figures and intriguing figures from its studies in a back catalogue that spans several years. Inspector Dogberry Manchester has benefited ment in agriculture and cater- Inspector Dogberry Business Green Blog businessgreen.com/blog Business Green’s site explores issues surrounding the environmental enterprise movement, from new technologies to help your business adapt to the government’s impact on environmental policy. You’re sure to find plenty to get your green creative juices flowing. theycanexploitthisschemeto generatemorerevenue. that spans several years. EnvAudit FREE How environmentally friendly is your business? EnvAudit asks you a series of questions about your environmental policy and suggests ways to go greener. greenMeter £3.80 If your work involves a lot of travelling, greenMeter analyses the efficiency of your driving technique to keep your carbon footprint as low as possible. Andrew Winston andrewwinston.com/blog Sustainable business expert Andrew Winston brings both general discussion and case studies to the table. As he explores green business around the world and examines the success stories, you may just find something that could inspire green policy in your own business. Edited by Bonnie Gardiner ExpertInsight INDUSTRY VIEW The rise of the façade engineer There’s a new science influencing the sustainability of our buildings depress warm internal temperatures. In the future, building façades will add sunglasses on a hot day. Clearly, we have the ability to open and close Façades can be creative and practical 11Sustainable cities AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 Car sharing scheme a hit in AmsterdamResearchbyEY(formallyErnst&Young)has businessfolkaresettocapitaliseontheshift. solarmightseemixedresultsasthedebates Car sharing scheme a hit in Amsterdam Addedtothelistof interestingDutch developments,Dogberry hearsthey’vecomeup withanewwaytocontrol transportissuesforthe peopleofAmsterdam. WeGoCarSharingisa peer-to-peercarsharing platformthatallows peoplewithoutcarsto rentthemfrompeoplein theneighbourhoodviaa speciallydesignedapp. Thetechnology,which trackswhoisdriving whatvehicle,andhow far,isdesignedtohelp ownersandrenters managereservations andhandlepayments. ResearchbyEY(formallyErnst&Young)has Car sharing scheme a hit in Amsterdam Addedtothelistof interestingDutch developments,Dogberry hearsthey’vecomeup withanewwaytocontrol transportissuesforthe peopleofAmsterdam. peer-to-peercarsharing platformthatallows peoplewithoutcarsto rentthemfrompeoplein speciallydesignedapp. andhandlepayments. ResearchbyEY(formallyErnst&Young)has businessfolkaresettocapitaliseontheshift.
  12. 12. ExpertInsight Sustainably developing city infrastructure Siemens is working to ensure that global urbanisation can support the environment and provide a better quality of life INDUSTRY VIEW T wo hundred years ago, just 3 per cent of the world’s population lived in cities. Today, the total has grown to more than half, and the trend is accelerating. Every week, the number of people living in urban centres grows by around one million. Some cities already have higher populations than countries such as Austria, Israel, Chile or Cambodia. Globally, the level of urbanisation is projected to rise to almost 70 per cent in 2050. Due to their increasing economic importance, cities are the engines that drive growth, offering opportunities for development, employment, and prosperity. Currently, an estimated 80 per cent of global GDP is generated in cities. Yet the negative effects of progress are also evident: noise, limited space, informal settlements, environmental pollution, and congested traffic, to name just a few. Already today, cities account for two thirds of global energy demand and up to 70 per cent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions. As urban populations continue to grow, sustainable development of city infrastructure is essential for wealthier developed cities and for cities in emerging and developing nations. Infrastructure is the backbone of a city, ensuring the delivery of goods and services that promote prosperity and growth, contributing to quality of life and the environment. Estimated annual expenditure on urban infrastructure is around €2tn worldwide. In emerging economies, the infrastructure cannot be built quickly enough to keep pace with economic and urban development, while in developed economies, many infrastructure systems are ageing and in need of repair. In many cases, they were not designed to cope with the population and lifestyles they must now support. In the global economy, cities and businesses that fail to invest in their infrastructure will lose out competitively. Intelligentsolutions However, infrastructure investments are long-term decisions that will impact on a city’s future development. Key decision makers in cities, whether they are public sector bodies, utilities, transport providers and operators, or private enterprises, require energy-efficient and intelligent infrastructures solutions for buildings, transportation, energy, and water supply to help them achieve their sustainability goals. They are not looking for isolated products, such as a fleet of buses – but rather overall concepts, such as how to improve traffic flow, reduce congestion and emissions and in response require integrated, intelligent solutions. Early engagement with infrastructure and technology providers – such as Siemens – at the initial planning stages is essential for getting the infrastructure right. Energy consumption and CO2 emissions can already be drastically reduced with today’s technologies. Buildings, for example, account for roughly 40 per cent of the world’s energy use. By intelligently integrating their lighting, data, climate, and security systems, this consumption can be reduced by up to 40 per cent. Siemens has a long record in automating systems and has consistently advanced technological progress in automation. Most AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH12 | EcoReport · September 2013 THENetherlandsispoweringaheadof other nations, not only for its ongoing successful clean mobility systems, but more broadly with the Amsterdam Innovation Motor, which is working to increase the capacity for innovation in the Amsterdam area, below. One such project that is currently fullspeedaheadistheAmsterdam Smart City (ASC) initiative – a unique partnership between companies, governments, research institutions and Amsterdamitselfwiththeaimto developlow-carbonintelligentcities. Theplatformhasbeenunderwayfor threeyears,growingtohavemorethan 90 partners, each active in different energyandopenconnectivityprojects, with a focus on sustainable economic investments. The collaboration of institutions and infrastructures has formed the Urban Living Labs, where businesses and citizens can develop, test and commercialisegreeninitiatives.Areas alreadybenefitingfromtheASCinclude sports parks, shopping, lighting, laws and regulations, connectivity and telecommuting. Drawing inspiration from outside nations,theAIMalsoencouragesOpen Cities or open innovation methods, looking to places with a different city government and business climate. Working in collaboration with Barcelona, Berlin, Helsinki and Paris, themes such as crowdsourcing, open data, sensor networks and living labs are explored to encourage the transfer of innovative knowledge.Butdespitethefocus on technology, there is no shortageofattentiongiventothe people of Amsterdam, with an obvious desire to mould young people into the leaders of tomorrow. The Amsterdam Human Capital project focuses on the training, recruitment and retention of talent in the ICT and life sciences sectors. The project recognises that talent is a critical factor for economic growth, and nurturing it will strengthen international competitiveness and improvesustainabilityinthelonghaul. usiness FIRSTestablishedin2006,Masdaris a bottom-up completely sustainable urbandevelopmentownedbytheAbu- DhabiGovernmentinpartnershipwith General Electric. The commercially driven carbon- neutralcityisbeingdesignedbyFoster andPartnersintheAbuDhabidesert, reliant only on clean technology and renewableenergy,andissaidtobecome home to 40, 000 people by 2025. Thisprojectwillplayahugerolein influencingsustainabilityaroundthe globe, though the location is curious, withAbuDhabi’slongstandingreliance on oil, being home to 8 per cent of the proven global crude oil reserves. The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company is also one of the largest in the world. So why commit billions of dollars todevelopingMasdarandestablishing Abu Dhabi as a global centre of excellence in renewable energy and pioneering clean technologies? Simple,theysay.Forthegoodofthe planet, and the future of Abu Dhabi. One such project that is currently fullspeedaheadistheAmsterdam Smart City (ASC) initiative – a unique partnership between companies, governments, research institutions and Amsterdamitselfwiththeaimto developlow-carbonintelligentcities. themes such as crowdsourcing, open data, sensor networks and living labs are explored to encourage the transfer of innovative knowledge.Butdespitethefocus on technology, there is no shortageofattentiongiventothe people of Amsterdam, with an United Arab Emirates Netherlands Artist’s impression of what zero-carbon Masdar City will look like from the air NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS usinessusiness NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS B worldwide greenhouse gas emissions. grow, sustainable development of city infrastructure is essential for wealthier developed cities and for cities in emerging and developing nations. Infrastructure is the backbone of a city, ensuring the delivery of goods and services that promote prosperity and growth, contributing to quality of life and the environment. Estimated annual expenditure on urban infrastructure is around €2tn worldwide. In emerging economies, the infrastructure cannot be built quickly enough to keep pace with From left: The Crystal building from the outside. Inside, visitors can see the world’s largest exhibition on sustainability HowtheydoitinBrazil bit.ly/LebplN The city of Curitiba, in south-east Brazil, shows why it’s a shining example of sustainability. Videooftheweek Sustainablecities
  13. 13. AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 | 13 orld SETTING the bar for sustainability in terms of crisis prevention, Spain recognises that keeping cities safe is a critical factor in its economic viability. In the grim aftermath of a Madrid terrorist bombing in 2004, the local authorities created the city’s first Integrated Security and Emergency Centre. Withinit,securityand emergencyspecialistsmonitor variousformsofdatasuchas videos,real-timefeedsandGPS systems,allforthepurposeof co-ordinatingtheresourcesand effortsofthepolice,fire,highway, hotlineandambulanceunits. Theterroristattacktriggered whathasbeenacknowledgedasa swift,butunco-ordinatedmedical reaction,whichwasdeemed unsatisfactoryandinneedofa shake-uptoensureafast,reliable andintegratedresponseto emergencies. This single, unified view of status and events has reduced confusion and enabled far faster and more effective decision making. Managers are now better able to deploy the right assets at the outset, reducing response time by 25 per cent. Meanwhile, the new dimension provided by the centre means commanders are now able to understand the complexity of incidents which can affect an entire region, and can better allocate and deploy emergency resources in a co-ordinated and effective manner, taking into account all of Madrid’s needs. By turning to autonomic sense-and-respond capabilities, analytics, visualisation and computational modelling, Madrid’s public safety systems have been made smarter, while driving a fundamental shift from simply responding to events to anticipatingandpreventingthem. ClosebehindMadrid,theUS hasanumberofcitiesuppingtheir gametotacklerisingcrimerates, suchasMemphiswherethecity policedepartmenthasimproved responsetimebyinvestingin softwareforpredictiveanalytics. Crimerateshavereducedbymore than30percent. Chicago too has advanced its citywide surveillance by working with IBM to create an Operation Virtual Shield, an advanced intelligent security system. SINGAPORE,oftenreferredtoas“the little red dot” is making efforts to changeitsmonikerto“thelittlegreen dot” to maintain its competitive sustainability initiatives. With geographical constraints forcing Singapore to move in the directionofsustainabilityasearlyas the 1970s, the city-state introduced the world’s first manual urban road pricing system, while in 1998 it was the first to use automation. At the 4th Sustainable Cities Conference held in Singapore, ProfessorSteffenLehmann,director of the China-Australia Centre for SustainableUrbanDevelopment,cited four areas for Singapore to focus on, including the problem of rising consumption, with the aim of minimising waste and changing consumerhabits,alongwithbiomass, through anaerobic digestion and composting, to produce energy and fertilizer instead of unreliable solar and wind power. Also recommended were more ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, with current 11 per cent cuts deemed as merely compliance level, and retrofitting public housing blocks rather than demolishing them. SingaporewasrecentlyvotedAsia’s greenestmetropolisinSiemen’sAsian Green City Index, and is already leadingthewayinwatermanagement, district cooling, integrating biodiversityandverticalgreeneryinto the urban context. Spain Singapore Aftermath of Madrid attack in 2004 orldorldorldorld S...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS... orldorldorldorld S...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS...OPINION...REPORTS...NEWS...VIEWS...INSIGHTS... W of the company’s products, from building automation systems to trains and power distribution systems contain embedded mini-computers that control the device. They already contain the intelligence required to automate processes and improve efficiencies, but because of their ability to collect and communicate data, they offer opportunities for further optimisation with the addition of IT in the upper layers. Many of these intelligent technologies save not only energy but money too, therefore many of them pay for themselves. From the perspective of a company such as Siemens, this leads to an obvious conclusion: climate protection is both good for our planet and for business. For example, in London, Siemens developed the city’s congestion charging system, traffic management systems, the drive technologies for the new hybrid buses, a satellite system for London’s entire bus fleet and a pilot e-charging project. The result was 20 per cent less traffic, an annual 150,000-tonne reduction in CO2 emissionsandasubstantialaccelerationof traffic flows around the city by 37 per cent. Citiesagainstcarbon In fact, many major cities around the globe are taking decisive action and setting goals for climate protection. London aims to slash its carbon emissions by 60 per cent by 2025. By the same year, Copenhagenplanstocutitscarbonemissions to zero. Munich wants to produce enough renewable power in its own plants to meet the city’s household energy needs by 2014, and the entire city’s energy needs by 2025. In recognition of the economic importance of cities and the fact that technology holds the answer to many urban challenges, Siemens established the Infrastructure & Cities Sector. Drawing on the breadth of the company’s portfolio and expertise, Siemens can develop customised solutions from one source. Its offerings include integrated mobility solutions, building and security technology, smart grids as well as low- and medium-voltage products. Central to the sector is the Crystal, a Sustainable Cities initiative. Located at Royal Victoria Docks in East London, the Crystal explores tomorrow’s cities today. The iconic crystalline building is home to the world’s largest exhibition focused on urban sustainability and a world-class centre for dialogue, discovery and learning (please see page 14 for more details). The future challenges of cities cannot be solved without partnerships between the public and private sectors. In addition to carrying out R&D to develop new technologies to address these challenges, Siemens works with respected experts to conduct studies on the performance of cities, to enhance the opportunity for learning and benchmarking. Clearly, the world’s cities will continue to define growth. However, ensuring that this growth is sustainable will be one of the great challenges of the coming decades. 020 7055 6472 www.siemens.co.uk How IT and automation can optimise infrastructure ● Buildingcontrolsthatadjustheatingand lightingbasedonarangeofparameters suchasoccupancyandlevelsofdaylight toreduceenergyconsumptionbyupto 30percent. Autonomoussystemssuchas ventilation,heating,airconditioning,lighting, safetyandsecuritycanbeintegratedinto onesystemformoreefficientoperation. ● Tollscanbeautomaticallyadjusted tokeeptrafficmovingbasedonthe volumeandspeedoftrafficasmeasured andtransmittedbysensors. ●Intelligenttrafficmanagementsystems integratedatafromnumeroussources suchassignalcontrollersandsensors measuringtrafficvolumeandspeed tomanagetrafficmoreeffectivelyand providereal-timetotravellerssothey canchoosewhenandhowtotravel. ● Inasmartgrid,intelligentdevices protectpowerlines,ensurepowerquality andmeasurepowerconsumption. Datageneratedbythesedevices combinedwithITapplicationsallow complexgridbalancing,includingload management,forecastingandtrading.
  14. 14. EcoReportZone Smarter ways of keeping the heat in What part can renewa- bles play in the future of our energy supplies? Essentiallyrenewableshave theabilitytofundamen- tallychangethewaywe liveandworkinawaythat willtransformourworld forever.Withpopulations risingandenergydemands withit,wehavetoexplore newwaysinwhichtokeep homesandbusinesses heatedinthefuture. Additionally,asweall growmoreenvironmen- tallyaware,identifyinga methodofdoingthiswithout causingfurtherdamage totheenvironmentmakes theconundrumeven hardertosolve.Ordoesit? Heatpumpswhich extractstoredsolarenergy fromthegroundorfromthe airarounduscanprovide heatingandhotwaterforany property.Linkthesesystems, which,bytheway,canbe easilyinstalledinexistingas wellasnewbuildingstosolar panels,andyouhavesome ofthepowerrequiredtorun them.You’vealsotakena hugesteptowardsbeinga carbonneutralproperty. Butitdoesn’tendthere. Homeownersandbusi- nessescannowaddtotheir revenuestreamsthanksto newgovernmentincentives whicheffectivelypaypeople forheatingtheirhomesand reducingtheirrunningcosts. Withmoredisposable income,theeconomycan onlybenefitbothlocally andglobally.Healthiermore comfortableworkingenvi- ronmentsmeanemployees canbecomemoreefficient. Fewersickdaysequals greaterproductivity.Balance sheetsalsolookhealthier freeingupincomeforfuture expansionandgrowth.Sud- denlythankstorenewables, communitiesandbusi- nesseslookbetterplaces,our citiesarethrivingandour environmentisprotected. Sowhatpartcan renewablesplayinthefuture ofourenergysupplies? Loweremissions,long- term,sustainableenergy,a healthierenvironmentand securityofsupply.Simple. Andrew Sheldon is managing director of Ice Energy Technologies www.iceenergy.co.uk I n its first year, Siemens’ urban development centre, the Crystal, has evolved into a global hub for urban sustainability, a well sought- after venue for conferences and meetings – and an East London landmark. From August 30, the Crystal will celebrate its first anniversary hosting the Sustainable Cities Week. The Crystal has fulfilled its mission of serving as a global centre for sustainable urban development. It has hosted a range of impressive events and international conferences with high-level audiences. Among them was the G8 Innovation Conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson’s Low Carbon Awards as well as the TED conference series’ TEDx Newham event and the International Federation for Housing and Planning’s conference. TheCrystalhasexceededeventhe mostoptimisticexpectationswith regardstovisitornumbers.International opinionleaders,businessgroups, universitystudentsandschoolchildren, cityplanners,urbanexperts,local residentsandtouristshaveturned thecentre–withtheworld’slargest exhibitiononthefutureofcities–into asuccessstory.InAugust,Crystal employeeswelcomedthe100,000th visitortotheEastLondonlandmark. AweekofhighlightsattheCrystalis scheduledfromAugust30toSeptember 5.TheSiemensFestivalNightswillbring thescreeningofoperaticmasterpieces toEastLondon.FromFridaytoTuesday, thepublicscreeningsofoperasfrom the2013SalzburgFestivalwillenchant audiencesoutsideandinsidetheCrystal. TheDLD(DigitalLifeDesign)conference’s roundtableonCityLivabilityandCulture willunitethoughtleadersandtheheads oficonicculturalinstitutionsonTuesday foraneveningoflivelydiscussion. TheinauguralC40andSiemens CityClimateLeadershipAwardswillbe presentedonWednesdaySeptember4 bySiemensInfrastructureandCities Sectorchiefexecutive,DrRolandBusch. DrBuschsays:“Siemensiswalking thetalkandhasbuilttheCrystal,oneof theworld’smostsustainablebuildings whichalsohoststheworldlargest exhibitiononurbansustainability.We aredelightedtohosttheC40awards,as Siemensisattheforefrontofsupporting citiestoaddressclimatechange.” OnThursdaySeptember5,theC40 andSiemensCityClimateLeadership AwardsConferencewillroundoff theSustainableCitiesWeek,focusing onbest-practicesharingamongthe citiesandkeyindustryguests. 020 7055 6472 www.thecrystal.org Tothinkdifferentlyabout water,youneedtothink differentlyaboutcities.  Waterhasalwaysbeen centraltourbanvitality:acity’s identitymayhingeonariveror coastline,andanon-demand supplyandgooddrainageare essential.However,thecracks areshowing. Hosepipebans, floodingandwatercourse pollutionareallsignsofstress.  Now,withtheclimate changingandthepopulation growing,urbanspacesneed tobetransformedintowater managementmachines.Toact ascatchmentsthatfilterand resupplywater–andbecome morebeautifulasaresult.  Thisprocessofwater sensitiveurbandesign reframeswatermanagement asanopportunityforplanning anddesign.Australiais20 yearsaheadofushere.Ithas micro-wetlandsincommercial courtyards,swalesalong thecentralreservationsof streetsandcity-widewater recycling.Rainwateris treatedasaresource,with landscapedesignedtohold andcleanserunoff.This providesanewsupply,and cutsdownstreamflooding riskandwaterpollution.  IntheUK,AECOMis pioneeringwatersensitive urbandesigninamasterplan fortheUniversityof Cambridge.Tospread further,strategicwater managementisneeded. Currentlyoneengineer designsthedrainagescheme, anotherconductsflood risk,andanotherconsiders supplyandwastewater.  Thetimehascome forplanners,architects, urbandesigners,landscape architectsandengineersto worktogetherinnewways, withanurgentpriorityin mind.Waterdeservestobe thoughtaboutdifferently.   Celeste Morgan is director of sustainability at AECOM 020 3009 2157   www.aecom.com EcoReportZone In focus: water management in cities Landmark celebrates first anniversary with Sustainable Cities Week Shining success for the Crystal “ Robert Swan, polar explorer The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it 14 Sustainable cities – Industry view AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPHEcoReport · September 2013 Urban wetlands strategy by AECOM for Melbourne Docklands water management in cities The Crystal has had 100,000 visitors in its first year AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH
  15. 15. The debate What makes a successful sustainable city? Chris Macey Chief executive Wintech Façade Engineers Sustainablecitiescanonlybeachieved byconstructingtrulysustainable buildings. Allbuildingsconsume energyandhaveacarbonfootprint; thesizeofthisbeingdependenton theenergyexpendedinday-to-day use. Thisislargelygovernedbyair conditioningtooffsetheatproduced bypeople,equipmentandsunshine throughwindowsforcommercial buildings–andoftenjustheating andlightinginresidentialproperties. Theenergyconsumedbyheating, ventilationandlightingequipment tomoderatetheinternalconditions isdependentontheenergythat theseservicesconsumeandalso theflowofheatandlightacrossthe building’sexternalsurfaces,referred toasthefaçade,orenvelope. Trulysustainablebuildingsrequire balancebetweentheenergyused bythebuildinganditsoccupants (servicesengineering)andthe energygainsandlossesacrossthe envelopeundervaryingweather conditions(façadeengineering). Thescienceoffaçadeengineering anditscontributiontoachievingtruly sustainablecitiesisanewimperative inthewholedesignprocess. 01902 307 430 www.wintech-group.co.uk Jeremy Greenwood Managing director – Readymix Lafarge Tarmac Sustainable cities should provide healthy, efficient and economically viable neighbourhoods where people will benefit from a cleaner, greener existence. While in the current financial climate we are not living that reality, an ever-growing population means the need for sustainable cities has become even greater. However, for this to be realised, the interpretation of the term “sustainable” needs to shift from its perception as a green buzzword into a statement of how the demands on a city’s resources are catered for in the long term.  With a nationwide requirement for more housing and better infrastructure, the sustainability of a city should reflect not only how efficiently these elements are provided but also the longevity of the services they provide. Whole- life cost needs to be considered fully alongside implementation, potential maintenance costs and carbon consumption to ensure a sustainable future is achieved. sustainablecities@ lafargetarmac.com www.lafargetarmac.com Rob Gillespie Service director Hounslow Highways Thetriplebottom-lineofsustainability haslongbeendefinedasdevelopment thatdeliverseconomic,environmental andsocialbenefits.Whilealong- termhighwayscontractmaynot seemlikeatypicalsustainability project,oncloserexamination,itis. Inmid-2012,theLondonBorough ofHounslowfinaliseda25-year dealwithHounslowHighways–an organisationmadeupofVINCI Concessions,RingwayandBarclays InfrastructureFund–andsecured long-termfundingfortheborough’s highwaysnetworkandupgrade oftheroads,footpathsandstreet lights.Withmorethan£100mbeing spentontheborough’sstreetsinthe nextfiveyears,theinfrastructure willnotonlybereturnedtoahigh quality,butwillalsobeefficiently maintainedforyearstocome. HounslowHighwaysworkswith thecouncil’sregenerationteamsto aligntheprojecttothemediumand long-termdevelopmentaspirationsof thecouncil.Asuccessful,sustainable cityrequiresdevelopmentthatmeets theneedsofthepresentwithout compromisingtheabilityforfuture generationstomeettheirownneeds. enquiries@hounslowhighways.org www.hounslowhighways.org Lynne Ceeney Global head of sustainability Parsons Brinckerhoff Likeamirage,thevisionofa sustainablecityhoverstantalisingly onthehorizonbuthauntingly beyondreach.Manycommentators focusonsmartcitiesusingbigdata andintegratedtechnologies.Butthis presentsmassivescalechallenges –technologies,governance,goal alignment,timetablesandfunding models,letaloneinvestment. Weneedamanageableprocess– individualbuildingblockstotestthe foundationsofpolicy,investment andgovernance. Afocusonspecific systems,includingenergy,transport, water,andevencarbon,allows ustotestdesignandtechnology. Workingatthescaleofsmaller townsorneighbourhoodscantest integratedplanningandgovernance. ParsonsBrinckerhoffisatthe heartofthisprocess,deliveringsmart systemsforenergyandtransport,and othercriticalinfrastructureprojects. Weareseeingthebenefitsoflocality planning,integratedinvestment andinfrastructuremodels. Retrofittingourcitieswillnotbe doneovernight.Buttherightbricks andmortarshouldhelpusreachthe sustainablecitiesonthehorizon. 020 7337 1700 services@pbworld.com David Handley Director, RES Advisory Renewable Energy Systems Inthepastyearwehaveseenapositive changeintherenewableenergysector, driveninpartbyacorporatesector bettereducatedonthebenefitsof renewableenergy.Thereisnoreason whycitiescannotfollowasimilar, smarttrajectory;itisjustamatterof scaleandaccessingtherightexpertise. Smartcitiesshouldbefollowing theexamplesetbytheleading corporateswhohavealready completedextensiveenergy efficiencyprogrammesandarenow demandingthenextstep–utility- scalerenewableenergygeneration assets. Thesestepswouldreduce thecommunity’scarbonemissions andimprovesecurityoftheir energysupply,andonandoff-site renewableenergygenerationhedges againstfossilfuelpricevolatility. Imagineawebofrenewable energysourcesthatcombines technologiesintegratedwithin thefabricofbuildingswithutility- scaleprojects(mainlybasedout oftown).Embracingrenewable energyatscale–bothinand surroundingsmartcities–canhave aprofoundimpactonemissions, energysecurityandcost. 01923299292 advisory@res-ltd.com 15Sustainable cities – Industry view AN INDEPENDENT REPORT FROM LYONSDOWN, DISTRIBUTED WITH THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH EcoReport · September 2013 If you are considering investing, either for a savings plan or for children or grandchildren, it may be worth considering our high-return timber investments. As market leaders within our sector, we offer contemporary forestry investments and have a proven track record for growing, harvesting and delivering investors their projected returns. 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