Pecha Kucha: Visual design in science

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My Msc lab held a Pecha Kucha day in 2006, and this is the talk that I gave, on visual design in science (co-written with my wife, a design and art student at the time).

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Pecha Kucha: Visual design in science

  1. 1. Visual Design in Science Steven Hamblin & Brandy Williams
  2. 2. Design is thinking made visual. -Saul Bass
  3. 3. At a glance we detect the following without conscious awareness. ! • • • • • motion edges of shapes colour contour contrast
  4. 4. We tend to disregard anything that isn’t meaningful or useful at the moment.
  5. 5. This has the visual impact of alphabet soup.
  6. 6. simplicity is not easy
  7. 7. Bad: Napalm in Vietnam - AP reporter Nick Út was among a number of reporters sent to the small village of Trang Bang along Route 1 ! - The South Vietnamese commander of the unit requested an air strike and propeller driven Skyraiders, Korean-war vintage planes from the 518th Vietnamese Airforce Squadron, dropped Napalm on the village. ! - When the smoke cleared villagers from the Trang Bang ran screaming from the village to the soldiers and reporters up the road.
  8. 8. Informational Hierarchy tells you where to look and what is important. It deals with: ! ! Font choice Colour size placement grouping weight & scale
  9. 9. Before & After This is an example of great informational hierarchy
  10. 10. ! composition is all about how the eyes move over a visual presentation. awareness of this allows you to control not only how the eyes move over your work, but also allows for easy reading and a positive impression by the viewer.
  11. 11. About invisible lines: Or here. Our eyes like it when there is something here.
  12. 12. A little bit about fonts ! 1. Comic Sans - just don’t do it. Ever. 2. Don’t use more than two fonts. 3. Choose either a serif or sans serif font. Don’t mix them.
  13. 13. dynamic design
  14. 14. Don’t just talk, tell a story...
  15. 15. This is not good.
  16. 16. This is better.
  17. 17. The more strikingly visual your presentation is, the more people will remember it. And more importantly, they will remember you. - Paul Arden

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