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A Step Toward Creating ADA Compliant Course
Sites:
Instructional Design tips for the visually impaired
and hard of hearing...
One fifth (20%) of the population has some kind of
disability.
Not all of these people have disabilities that make it
diff...
Are our courses Accessible?
Section 508:
An amendment to the
United States Workforce
Rehabilitation Act of 1973,
is a fed...
The major categories of disability types are:
Visual
Hearing
Motor
Cognitive
From their point of view…
Check List for your courses
Type Formatting
Word, Power Point, and PDF documents
Links
Images
Audio and Video
Type Formatting
and Document Organization
• Use sans-serif fonts designed for legibility on the computer screen (e.g., Ari...
Type Formatting
Word Documents
Type Formatting
PDF Documents
Type Formatting
PowerPoint Presentations
Checking Accessibility
PowerPoint Presentations
Links
Links are more useful when they make sense
out of context.
Avoid non-informative link phrases such as:
•click here
•...
Images
Consider the Color Blind
Color Blind
Simulator
Normal Color Red-Blind/Protanopia
Audio and Video
Add Closed
Captioning or a
Transcript for the
video.
Additional Resources
ADA Standards for Accessible Design
University of Central Florida Accessible Content
Formatting Gui...
A Step Toward Creating ADA Compliant Course Sites, presented by Wilmington University's Instructional Design Team
A Step Toward Creating ADA Compliant Course Sites, presented by Wilmington University's Instructional Design Team
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A Step Toward Creating ADA Compliant Course Sites, presented by Wilmington University's Instructional Design Team

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Dana Gullo, Instructional Designer at Wilmington University, http://wilmu.edu/online, shares how to create ADA Compliant Course Sites. Learn simple ways on how you can transform your courses to be more ADA compliant. Explore areas such as creating accessible PDF documents, appropriate font, style, and color choices, video captioning, and graphics considerations.
These Instructional Design tips are especially helpful for the visually impaired and hard of hearing student in your online course.

This presentation was first shared at the 2016 Northeast E-learning Consortium, view additional archived presentations at this link: http://northeastelearning.org/2016-archives/

Published in: Education
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A Step Toward Creating ADA Compliant Course Sites, presented by Wilmington University's Instructional Design Team

  1. 1. A Step Toward Creating ADA Compliant Course Sites: Instructional Design tips for the visually impaired and hard of hearing student in your online course. Presented by: Dana Gullo
  2. 2. One fifth (20%) of the population has some kind of disability. Not all of these people have disabilities that make it difficult for them to access the internet, but it is still a significant portion of the population. Businesses would be unwise to purposely exclude 20, 10, or even 5 percent of their potential customers from their web sites. For schools, universities, and government entities it would not only be unwise, but in many cases, it would also violate the law.
  3. 3. Are our courses Accessible? Section 508: An amendment to the United States Workforce Rehabilitation Act of 1973, is a federal law mandating that all electronic and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by the federal government be accessible to people with disabilities. ADA Compliance: The Department of Justice (DOJ) published the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design in September 2010. These standards state that all electronic and information technology must be accessible to people with disabilities.
  4. 4. The major categories of disability types are: Visual Hearing Motor Cognitive
  5. 5. From their point of view…
  6. 6. Check List for your courses Type Formatting Word, Power Point, and PDF documents Links Images Audio and Video
  7. 7. Type Formatting and Document Organization • Use sans-serif fonts designed for legibility on the computer screen (e.g., Arial, Verdana, Helvetica). • Use bold or italic text to display emphasis. • Don’t underline words since on a web page this indicates hyperlinks. • Avoid using colored text (such as red) for emphasis since screen readers will not indicate it is there. • Avoid including moving or blinking text. • Keep the number of fonts used in a document to a minimum.
  8. 8. Type Formatting Word Documents
  9. 9. Type Formatting PDF Documents
  10. 10. Type Formatting PowerPoint Presentations
  11. 11. Checking Accessibility PowerPoint Presentations
  12. 12. Links Links are more useful when they make sense out of context. Avoid non-informative link phrases such as: •click here •here •more •read more •link to [some link destination] •info
  13. 13. Images
  14. 14. Consider the Color Blind Color Blind Simulator Normal Color Red-Blind/Protanopia
  15. 15. Audio and Video Add Closed Captioning or a Transcript for the video.
  16. 16. Additional Resources ADA Standards for Accessible Design University of Central Florida Accessible Content Formatting Guidelines Web AIM Northeastern University Instructor Resource Center: Best Practices for Online Course Accessibility National Center on Universal Design for Learning: Postsecondary Education and UDL

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