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Smart Growth, Displacement and Environmental Justice: The Case of Los Angeles

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Smart Growth, Displacement and Environmental Justice: The Case of Los Angeles

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A discussion of strategies to mitigate displacement and promote environmental justice while meeting climate action goals in smart growth, transit-oriented communities. First given at the Cornell University College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP) on April 7, 2016.

A discussion of strategies to mitigate displacement and promote environmental justice while meeting climate action goals in smart growth, transit-oriented communities. First given at the Cornell University College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP) on April 7, 2016.

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Smart Growth, Displacement and Environmental Justice: The Case of Los Angeles

  1. 1. Smart Growth, Displacement and Environmental Justice: The Case of Los Angeles 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 1 William Riggs Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
  2. 2. • Context • Issues • Opportunities 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 2
  3. 3. Context • Federal – Civil Rights Act of 1964 – Title VI – Executive Order (EO) 12898 (1994), Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations – Executive Order (EO) 13166 (2000), Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency – 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 450 – FHWA NEPA regulations in 23 CFR 771.111 A – Section 109(h) of Title 23 – The Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies act of 1970 (URA), as amended – The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) (1998) – Memorandum of Understanding on Environmental Justice and EO 12898 (2011) – Federal Transit Authority (FTA) Circular 4702 1A (2011) – FTA Circular 4703.1 (2012) • California – CA SB 115 (1999) – California Government Code Section 11135 – California Code Section 65589.5 – Housing Accountability Act & Fair Housing Act Requirements – CA SB 375 Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act of 2008 – CEQA Guidelines 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 3
  4. 4. Issues • Smart Growth & Regeneration • GHG Reduction Strategies 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 4
  5. 5. 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 5
  6. 6. 4/8/2016 William Riggs, PhD, wriggs@calpoly.edu 6
  7. 7. Issues Environmental Justice Areas Disadvantaged Communities Communities of Concern Population 12.4 million 6.4 million 4.2 million % of regional population 68% 35% 23% % minority population within EJ identified area 80% 88% 91% % of households in poverty within EJ identified area 17% 25% 40% 4/8/2016 William Riggs, PhD, wriggs@calpoly.edu 7
  8. 8. 4/8/2016 William Riggs, PhD, wriggs@calpoly.edu 8
  9. 9. Opportunities • Focused Development in TPAs – BMR / Inclusivity – Loan Programs – Environmental / Permit Fast-tracking 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 9
  10. 10. Opportunities • Provide more collaboration tools • Below Market Rate Housing Standards – Regional Inclusionary Housing – Require Building / Unit Type Standards (Regional Project Performance Requirements) • Regional University Partnerships • Explore Financial Tools for Affordability – LEMs – Tax credit / tax holidays • Increase the number of jobs near housing • Set regional open space standard / performance measure – Implement both greenbelt and urban greening policy – Consider food and open space access in housing 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 20 40 60 80 100 Challenge Impact In 2012 RTP / SCS Not in RTP / SCS 4/8/2016 William Riggs, PhD, wriggs@calpoly.edu 10
  11. 11. 4/8/2016 William Riggs, PhD, wriggs@calpoly.edu 11
  12. 12. Opportunities • Adaptive Reuse – Neighborhood Stabilization – Potential Economic Buoyancy 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 12
  13. 13. 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 13
  14. 14. Opportunities 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 14
  15. 15. Conclusion: Process & Evolution PHASE I PHASE II Policies Develop formal EJ program Planning & Project Development • Target Community Advocacy Groups • Organize pubic Mee ngs • Measure and compare impacts • Document processes & mi gate impacts Implementa on Maintain communica on links with public Evalua on & Monitoring • Survey Target Advocacy groups • Measure outcomes by quan ta ve performance measures and changes in percep on PHASE III Link results to policy and funding decisions Federal Regula ons 4/8/2016 WilliamRiggs,PhD,wriggs@calpoly.edu 15

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