Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Corey Miller 
www.sierramonitor.com
• Provide insight and promote discussion on what it will 
take to prepare your Maintenance Facility for 
alternative fuele...
• Various codes and ordinances that influence design 
• Equipment commonly used in operation of system 
www.sierramonitor....
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Natural Gas (Methane, CH4) 
– 100% LEL = 5% by volume 
– Lighter than air 
– Odorless 
– CNG = Co...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Hydrogen (H2) 
– 100% LEL = 4% by volume 
– Much lighter than air 
– Odorless 
– Used as fuels in...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Propane 
– 100% LEL = 2.1% by volume 
– Heavier than air 
– Odorless 
– Liquefied for storage and...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• International Code Council 
– International Fire Code (IFC 2012) 
• Section 2311.7 
– Requires ga...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 
– NFPA 30A (2012) – Repair Garage-Major, where light...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 
– NFPA 52 (2013) – Vehicular Gaseous Fuel Systems 
–...
• Note that the ICC code series and NFPA 30A, 52 and 
88A are codes that, if adopted, are adopted voluntarily 
by states a...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Type of work being conducted on vehicles 
– Major or Minor 
• Solicit the services of a qualified...
• Gas detection has two deployment alternatives 
www.sierramonitor.com 
– Portable – used as personnel protection 
and is ...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Controller based vs. Sensor based systems 
• Controller based 
– Pro 
• Control and interface fro...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Controller based vs. Sensor based systems 
• Sensor based 
– Pro 
• More flexibility in system de...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Open Path Gas Detection 
– Pro 
• Less cost per area 
• Fewer components 
– Con 
• Not accurate f...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Open Path Gas Detection
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Open Path Gas Detection
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Catalytic bead 
• Infrared 
• Electrochemical
Passive Bead 
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Combustible materials (CH4 and H2) 
• Performance approved by a NRTL 
– UL2075, FM ...
www.sierramonitor.com 
Detector Source 
Sample Cell 
• Light hydrocarbons, C1-C6 not Hydrogen 
• Located with the 18” of t...
• CO and NO2 
• Located in the “breath zone” (4~7 ft. off grade.) 
• Current generating electrolytic reaction 
• High sens...
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Design Consideration 
– Sensor Location 
• Spacing 
• Height 
– Combustible 
» Hydrogen (H2) 
» M...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Notification 
– Required at 25% LEL of combustible level 
– Visual from all points 
– Audible to ...
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Natural air flow 
• Pressurization of office areas 
• Evacuation of air 
– Exhaust Fans 
• Produc...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• “Push/Pull” Design - Simple 
– Air is 100% Cubic Feet per Minute of outside air 
– Air Handling U...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Air Volume (CFM) Requirements 
– NORMAL (Low fan Speed) 
• Minimum One (1) CFM per 12-Cubic Feet ...
www.sierramonitor.com
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Security 
– Vents over doors 
• Shunt trip and shut down 
• Explosion proof requirements 
• Signa...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Total Cost of Ownership 
– Utility cost 
• Moving the air 
• Heating the air 
– Equipment cost 
•...
www.sierramonitor.com 
• Total Cost of Ownership 
• Equipment maintenance cost 
– Annually, estimated $25~$150 per sensor ...
www.sierramonitor.com 
Contact Sierra Monitor at: 
www.sierramonitor.com 
408-262-6611 
sales@sierramonitor.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Alternative Fuels Workshop & Wisconsin Smart Fleet Recognition Program - Sierra Monitor Corporation Presentation

434 views

Published on

Corey Miller, Sierra Monitor Corporation, presented information on Preparing Maintenance Facilities for Alternative Fueled Vehicles for our Alternative Fuels Workshop & Wisconsin Smart Fleet Recognition Program in Madison, WI.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Alternative Fuels Workshop & Wisconsin Smart Fleet Recognition Program - Sierra Monitor Corporation Presentation

  1. 1. Corey Miller www.sierramonitor.com
  2. 2. • Provide insight and promote discussion on what it will take to prepare your Maintenance Facility for alternative fueled vehicles • Define alternative fuels as non-gasoline/diesel. Includes CNG, LNG, LPG, Hydrogen and Fuel Cell • Review hazardous nature of these fuels www.sierramonitor.com
  3. 3. • Various codes and ordinances that influence design • Equipment commonly used in operation of system www.sierramonitor.com – Detection – Alarm – Mitigation • Cost of ownership
  4. 4. www.sierramonitor.com • Natural Gas (Methane, CH4) – 100% LEL = 5% by volume – Lighter than air – Odorless – CNG = Compressed Natural Gas – LNG = Liquid Natural Gas
  5. 5. www.sierramonitor.com • Hydrogen (H2) – 100% LEL = 4% by volume – Much lighter than air – Odorless – Used as fuels in two methods • Combustion engines • Fuel Cell to create electricity
  6. 6. www.sierramonitor.com • Propane – 100% LEL = 2.1% by volume – Heavier than air – Odorless – Liquefied for storage and transportation but gas for combustion
  7. 7. www.sierramonitor.com • International Code Council – International Fire Code (IFC 2012) • Section 2311.7 – Requires gas detection equipment for non-odorized gases – Shall be “performance approved” – International Mechanical Code (IMC 2012) – International Building Code (IBC 2012)
  8. 8. www.sierramonitor.com • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) – NFPA 30A (2012) – Repair Garage-Major, where lighter-than air gaseous fueled vehicles are repaired or stored • The terms “repair garage – major” are intended to correlate with Article 511.3 of NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code® • Within 18 in. (450 mm) of ceiling, except as noted below – Class 1 Div 2 • Within 18 in. (450 mm) of ceiling where ventilation of at least one ft3/min./ft2 of floor area is provided and suction is taken from a point within 18 in. (450 mm) of the highest point in the ceiling – Unclassified
  9. 9. www.sierramonitor.com • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) – NFPA 52 (2013) – Vehicular Gaseous Fuel Systems – NFPA 88A (2011) – Standards for Parking Structures – NFPA 59 (2012) -- Standard for the Storage and Handling of Liquefied Petroleum Gases at Utility Gas Plants
  10. 10. • Note that the ICC code series and NFPA 30A, 52 and 88A are codes that, if adopted, are adopted voluntarily by states and enforced by the local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) • Local AHJ may enforce additional requirements beyond the national codes and thus should be consulted directly before final design of any modifications www.sierramonitor.com
  11. 11. www.sierramonitor.com • Type of work being conducted on vehicles – Major or Minor • Solicit the services of a qualified engineer (NFPA52) • Building structure • Natural ventilation • Surrounding buildings • Security • Occupation • Ignition Source – Heaters, grinding and welding areas • Geographic and climate considerations
  12. 12. • Gas detection has two deployment alternatives www.sierramonitor.com – Portable – used as personnel protection and is not used as detection method in maintenance facility – Fixed – use for area protection and alarm activation
  13. 13. www.sierramonitor.com • Controller based vs. Sensor based systems • Controller based – Pro • Control and interface from a single point • Easier to install with fewer wires • Third party approval for a complete system • Simpler calibration technique – Con • Size limitation
  14. 14. www.sierramonitor.com • Controller based vs. Sensor based systems • Sensor based – Pro • More flexibility in system design • Third part approvals for sensors only – Con • Requires data wires and power wires • Calibration can be more cumbersome
  15. 15. www.sierramonitor.com • Open Path Gas Detection – Pro • Less cost per area • Fewer components – Con • Not accurate for point gas level analysis – Measures in LEL/meter • Difficult to install • Not accepted by some local AHJ
  16. 16. www.sierramonitor.com • Open Path Gas Detection
  17. 17. www.sierramonitor.com • Open Path Gas Detection
  18. 18. www.sierramonitor.com • Catalytic bead • Infrared • Electrochemical
  19. 19. Passive Bead www.sierramonitor.com • Combustible materials (CH4 and H2) • Performance approved by a NRTL – UL2075, FM 6320 or CSA 22.2 No. 152 • Requires periodic calibration – 90 days or 180 days DC Supply Output Active Bead
  20. 20. www.sierramonitor.com Detector Source Sample Cell • Light hydrocarbons, C1-C6 not Hydrogen • Located with the 18” of the ceiling • Performance approved • Accurate & stable • Large measurement range • Low maintenance • 1 Year calibration interval
  21. 21. • CO and NO2 • Located in the “breath zone” (4~7 ft. off grade.) • Current generating electrolytic reaction • High sensitivity for PPM levels of toxic gas • Specificity to gas of interest www.sierramonitor.com
  22. 22. www.sierramonitor.com
  23. 23. www.sierramonitor.com
  24. 24. www.sierramonitor.com
  25. 25. www.sierramonitor.com
  26. 26. www.sierramonitor.com
  27. 27. www.sierramonitor.com
  28. 28. www.sierramonitor.com • Design Consideration – Sensor Location • Spacing • Height – Combustible » Hydrogen (H2) » Methane (CH4) » Propane – Toxic » Carbon Monoxide » Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) • Use of common sense
  29. 29. www.sierramonitor.com • Notification – Required at 25% LEL of combustible level – Visual from all points – Audible to all – ADA compliant – First responder intuitive – Allow the authority to know when it is safe to return – Evacuation if required • Audible and Visual are different than “Fire Alarm” • Auto dialers, where required
  30. 30. www.sierramonitor.com
  31. 31. www.sierramonitor.com • Natural air flow • Pressurization of office areas • Evacuation of air – Exhaust Fans • Produce make-up air – HVAC – Doors and Vents
  32. 32. www.sierramonitor.com • “Push/Pull” Design - Simple – Air is 100% Cubic Feet per Minute of outside air – Air Handling Unit(s) “push” air into the building – Exhaust fan(s) “pull” the air from the building and exhaust to atmosphere • Two modes of operation – NORMAL (Low fan speed) - 24-Hours/Day 7 Days/Week – EMERGENCY (High fan speed) • Activated on flammable gas concentration of not more than 20%
  33. 33. www.sierramonitor.com • Air Volume (CFM) Requirements – NORMAL (Low fan Speed) • Minimum One (1) CFM per 12-Cubic Feet of Room Volume (Room volume = length (ft.) x width (ft.) x height (ft.)) • Minimum per National Fire Protection Code NFPA 52 – EMERGENCY (High fan Speed) • Change the volume of air eight (8) times each 60-minutes (vs. NORMAL at five (5) times each 60-minutes • Eight (8) air changes each 60-minutes equals about 45% more Emergency air volume (CFM) than Normal air volume
  34. 34. www.sierramonitor.com
  35. 35. www.sierramonitor.com • Security – Vents over doors • Shunt trip and shut down • Explosion proof requirements • Signage
  36. 36. www.sierramonitor.com • Total Cost of Ownership – Utility cost • Moving the air • Heating the air – Equipment cost • Installation – 75K to 150K estimated per bay – Includes design and build
  37. 37. www.sierramonitor.com • Total Cost of Ownership • Equipment maintenance cost – Annually, estimated $25~$150 per sensor » Access to the sensor • Ladder, Scissor Lift or Bucket Lift » Full system test: Horns, Strobes and BBU • Safety
  38. 38. www.sierramonitor.com Contact Sierra Monitor at: www.sierramonitor.com 408-262-6611 sales@sierramonitor.com

×