J I M  P A R E D E S C R E A T I V E  G U R U
How to make  OPM world-class! By Jim Paredes
A Brief   (and rough)  History  of OPM <ul><li>From the 60’s to the present </li></ul>
Dekada 60s <ul><li>There were very few FM stations. Mostly it was AM. </li></ul><ul><li>Television was in its infancy. </l...
Dekada 60s <ul><li>Records sold and played on media were largely foreign (American) material </li></ul><ul><li>Filipino ar...
Dekada 60 <ul><li>The “class” audience listened to music selected from American Bandstand, the predecessor of US Top 40 as...
Dekada 60s <ul><li>The “Bakya” audience were exposed to the same thing but mostly catered to local recordings. </li></ul>
What were local 60’s recordings like? <ul><li>There were folk songs, and Kundiman materials recorded. </li></ul><ul><li>Th...
What were  local 60s recordings like ? <ul><li>There were very few new original materials. </li></ul><ul><li>The local rec...
Dekada 60s: <ul><li>The “class” crowd went for the original and disdained the covers. One might say that the appeal of mus...
Mass Followed Class <ul><li>The so-called “Bakya” crowd responded to  the same aspirational appeal by patronizing  the cov...
Dekada 70s
The Age Of Relevance
Dekada 70s <ul><li>There were more FM stations and bigger listenership </li></ul><ul><li>There were more television statio...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>Society was in social turmoil—Marcos was reelected, the founding of the CPP, Martial Law, student unres...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>“ Filipinization”, or the wide use of Tagalog was happening in Universities. </li></ul>
Dekada 70s <ul><li>The young people were rebellious, influenced perhaps  by the Hippie movement in the US and the social u...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>New songwriters and performers joined the scene. They were young, educated, and non-traditional. </li><...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>Even if they grew up with American music, many of them decided to write and sing in Tagalog to be relev...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>Both “class” and “Bakya” crowds responded to the same OPM music. </li></ul>
Dekada 70s <ul><li>It was hip to sing in Tagalog </li></ul><ul><li>It was hip to be original </li></ul><ul><li>It was prof...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>Artists wanted to capture the lucrative mass “Bakya” market  </li></ul>
Dekada 70s <ul><li>In the 70s, one can say that  “ Class followed mass .” </li></ul>
Dekada 70s <ul><li>Many new artists of diverse styles entered the scene </li></ul>
Dekada 70s <ul><li>New musical genres were introduced and clicked with the mainstream market. e.g.  Pinoy  rock, pop, jazz...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>A  great  and wide repertoire was created (which is alive to this day) </li></ul>
Dekada 70s <ul><li>There was some sort of  “renaissance” , in Filipino music with so much output in so many genres as done...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>The 70s saw the birth of the “Manila Sound” which was encompassed into a larger genre called OPM </li><...
In 1978, OPM as a brand was created
Dekada 70s <ul><li>The 70s saw the start of real active concert scene  </li></ul><ul><li>music festivals (Metro Pop) </li>...
Dekada 70s <ul><li>the world recognition of OPM as Filipino singers and songs win in numerous festivals  </li></ul><ul><li...
Dekada 80s
Dekada 80s <ul><li>At the onset, OPM’s acceptance  continued with more artists and songs doing original material </li></ul>
Dekada 80s <ul><li>Enter MTV. TV now played a bigger role in music promotion.  </li></ul>
Dekada 80s <ul><li>FM , now the dominant  radio format for music dissemination slowly adopts US Top 40 format,  feel and s...
Dekada 80s <ul><li>OPM creators begin to feel constricted with “sound” radio is promoting. New sounds in step with US Top ...
Dekada 80s <ul><li>Record companies, knowing promotions are dependent on radio encourage artists to go along with new form...
Dekada 80s <ul><li>There is less OPM output. There is even less variety. Original English songs are on the rise. </li></ul>
Dekada 80s <ul><li>Remakes of old OPM hits abound as record companies invest less in new, untested materials </li></ul>
Dekada 80s <ul><li>The specter of piracy is felt by record companies, as markets dwindle. </li></ul>
Dekada 80s <ul><li>Gold and Platinum award record standards are adjusted to lower levels </li></ul>
Dekada 90s
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Radio and TV, now more influential than ever adopt American music formats and MTV.  </li></ul>
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Many OPM artists revert back to copying foreign artists </li></ul>
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Piracy is at unprecedented levels.  </li></ul>
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Because of dwindling markets caused by piracy and changing tastes, record companies  slash local produc...
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Enter the alternative bands. Able to record with smaller budgets, they dominate the music scene. </li><...
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Record companies grapple with even more dwindling markets, high costs, piracy and sponsor less and less...
Dekada 90s <ul><li>Independent producers or “Indies” enter the scene to fill the gap. </li></ul>
Dekada 90s <ul><li>The gap is not really filled. The music recording scene is but a shadow of what it was in its hey days ...
The last 5 years <ul><li>The Age  </li></ul><ul><li>of the  </li></ul><ul><li>Bands </li></ul>
<ul><li>More varied sounds coming out compared to the 5 years before </li></ul><ul><li>OPM band music in rock is very popu...
<ul><li>-Piracy is stronger than ever and actually eats up almost 30 to 40% of the market. </li></ul><ul><li>-OPM is nowhe...
So what is wrong and how can we  fix it?
What went wrong? <ul><li>1) Radio and TV “reformatting” at the start of the 80s constricted the growth of OPM </li></ul>
What went wrong? <ul><li>2) Lack of commitment from record companies, artists to develop and pursue OPM started in the 70s...
What went wrong? <ul><li>Lack of political will to curb piracy </li></ul>
What can we do?
ENCOURAGE OPM MUSIC IN ALL ASPECTS AND ALL WAYS. FOR STARTERS…
<ul><li>1) Change radio and TV formats to allow greater access to many types of OPM, not just  those that conform to certa...
<ul><li>2) Artists, audience and record companies must recommit to creating and promoting  more OPM material </li></ul>
<ul><li>3) Minimize if not totally eradicate the scourge of piracy  </li></ul>
OPM  and World Markets
<ul><li>Almost every Filipino songwriter and artist has always dreamed of making it big both here and abroad. </li></ul>
<ul><li>We have traditionally followed the </li></ul><ul><li>Two Streams Approach </li></ul>
The Two Streams of OPM <ul><li>OPM  in Filipino for Filipinos </li></ul><ul><li>OPM in English for the world </li></ul>
<ul><li>If the aim is to make it big in the world,  </li></ul><ul><li>What is the best strategy? </li></ul>
How the rest of the world did it and continues to do so.
Look around us
<ul><li>The Brazillians gave the world “samba” and “bossa” </li></ul><ul><li>The Jamaicans gave reggae, ska </li></ul>
<ul><li>The Latinos  gave the latin beats—salsa, merengue, tango, chacha, etc </li></ul><ul><li>Cuba has influenced Wester...
<ul><li>Australian Aborigines have their own digeridoo sound  </li></ul><ul><li>Africans have their wild beats and percuss...
<ul><li>India gave the world its music and Bollywood </li></ul><ul><li>Ireland gave us Celtic music </li></ul>
<ul><li>Even Mongolia has its Tuva singers who have made their mark in the world with “Throat singing” </li></ul>
The point is every nationality that contributes to world culture leaves a distinct mark—themselves! What they ARE is their...
We seem to be an exemption in this.
<ul><li>We try hard to be “international” by attempting to build on American popular music. In the process, we abandon wha...
We try to “respond”  by attempting to give the market what we think  it will go for.
<ul><li>Historically, this strategy has not produced anything that has put us on the map. </li></ul>
On the contrary, the only two Filipino songs that made it in the world or at least are recognizable in  other countries  a...
The better strategy for OPM to contribute to world music is this:
<ul><li>Create a Filipino sound (or sounds) by encouraging ALL types of music to be written in Filipino. </li></ul><ul><li...
There is no question that we as a people have the talent  (hardware) to succeed. We just have to develop a truly Filipino ...
Advice to creators of music <ul><li>Write for your milieu. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Magpakatotoo ka” </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t st...
<ul><li>To be global, one must be local </li></ul>
The best, most realistic and sustainable strategy for OPM to become international therefore is this: Create Filipino music...
<ul><li>Only when we focus in creating music that represents who we really are will the world take notice.  </li></ul>
END
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Whynot02 Jim Paredes

  1. 1. J I M P A R E D E S C R E A T I V E G U R U
  2. 2. How to make OPM world-class! By Jim Paredes
  3. 3. A Brief (and rough) History of OPM <ul><li>From the 60’s to the present </li></ul>
  4. 4. Dekada 60s <ul><li>There were very few FM stations. Mostly it was AM. </li></ul><ul><li>Television was in its infancy. </li></ul><ul><li>Filipino Artists mostly aspired to copy famous American Talents. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Dekada 60s <ul><li>Records sold and played on media were largely foreign (American) material </li></ul><ul><li>Filipino artists were few. Filipino recordings were even fewer. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Dekada 60 <ul><li>The “class” audience listened to music selected from American Bandstand, the predecessor of US Top 40 as disseminated on radio. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Dekada 60s <ul><li>The “Bakya” audience were exposed to the same thing but mostly catered to local recordings. </li></ul>
  8. 8. What were local 60’s recordings like? <ul><li>There were folk songs, and Kundiman materials recorded. </li></ul><ul><li>There were “covers” done by Filipino wannabes who carried titles such as “ Elvis Presley of the Philippines” and the like. </li></ul>
  9. 9. What were local 60s recordings like ? <ul><li>There were very few new original materials. </li></ul><ul><li>The local recordings, as described by people then were “ tunog lata ”. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Dekada 60s: <ul><li>The “class” crowd went for the original and disdained the covers. One might say that the appeal of music then had an underlying aspirational come-on, an attraction to things American. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Mass Followed Class <ul><li>The so-called “Bakya” crowd responded to the same aspirational appeal by patronizing the covers. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Dekada 70s
  13. 13. The Age Of Relevance
  14. 14. Dekada 70s <ul><li>There were more FM stations and bigger listenership </li></ul><ul><li>There were more television stations with musical formats </li></ul>
  15. 15. Dekada 70s <ul><li>Society was in social turmoil—Marcos was reelected, the founding of the CPP, Martial Law, student unrest, etc.. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Dekada 70s <ul><li>“ Filipinization”, or the wide use of Tagalog was happening in Universities. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Dekada 70s <ul><li>The young people were rebellious, influenced perhaps by the Hippie movement in the US and the social upheavals here at home. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Dekada 70s <ul><li>New songwriters and performers joined the scene. They were young, educated, and non-traditional. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Dekada 70s <ul><li>Even if they grew up with American music, many of them decided to write and sing in Tagalog to be relevant to the local context. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Dekada 70s <ul><li>Both “class” and “Bakya” crowds responded to the same OPM music. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Dekada 70s <ul><li>It was hip to sing in Tagalog </li></ul><ul><li>It was hip to be original </li></ul><ul><li>It was profitable to create new expressions in music </li></ul>
  22. 22. Dekada 70s <ul><li>Artists wanted to capture the lucrative mass “Bakya” market </li></ul>
  23. 23. Dekada 70s <ul><li>In the 70s, one can say that “ Class followed mass .” </li></ul>
  24. 24. Dekada 70s <ul><li>Many new artists of diverse styles entered the scene </li></ul>
  25. 25. Dekada 70s <ul><li>New musical genres were introduced and clicked with the mainstream market. e.g. Pinoy rock, pop, jazz, disco, dance, new ballads, folk, ethnic… </li></ul>
  26. 26. Dekada 70s <ul><li>A great and wide repertoire was created (which is alive to this day) </li></ul>
  27. 27. Dekada 70s <ul><li>There was some sort of “renaissance” , in Filipino music with so much output in so many genres as done by an unprecedented number of people. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Dekada 70s <ul><li>The 70s saw the birth of the “Manila Sound” which was encompassed into a larger genre called OPM </li></ul>
  29. 29. In 1978, OPM as a brand was created
  30. 30. Dekada 70s <ul><li>The 70s saw the start of real active concert scene </li></ul><ul><li>music festivals (Metro Pop) </li></ul><ul><li>Solid and consistent radio play of Filipino artists </li></ul>
  31. 31. Dekada 70s <ul><li>the world recognition of OPM as Filipino singers and songs win in numerous festivals </li></ul><ul><li>Freddie Aguilar scores a world hit with “ Anak ”. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Dekada 80s
  33. 33. Dekada 80s <ul><li>At the onset, OPM’s acceptance continued with more artists and songs doing original material </li></ul>
  34. 34. Dekada 80s <ul><li>Enter MTV. TV now played a bigger role in music promotion. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Dekada 80s <ul><li>FM , now the dominant radio format for music dissemination slowly adopts US Top 40 format, feel and sound including faster turnover of music </li></ul>
  36. 36. Dekada 80s <ul><li>OPM creators begin to feel constricted with “sound” radio is promoting. New sounds in step with US Top 40 format are created while many other genres get less airplay. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Dekada 80s <ul><li>Record companies, knowing promotions are dependent on radio encourage artists to go along with new format. </li></ul>
  38. 38. Dekada 80s <ul><li>There is less OPM output. There is even less variety. Original English songs are on the rise. </li></ul>
  39. 39. Dekada 80s <ul><li>Remakes of old OPM hits abound as record companies invest less in new, untested materials </li></ul>
  40. 40. Dekada 80s <ul><li>The specter of piracy is felt by record companies, as markets dwindle. </li></ul>
  41. 41. Dekada 80s <ul><li>Gold and Platinum award record standards are adjusted to lower levels </li></ul>
  42. 42. Dekada 90s
  43. 43. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Radio and TV, now more influential than ever adopt American music formats and MTV. </li></ul>
  44. 44. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Many OPM artists revert back to copying foreign artists </li></ul>
  45. 45. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Piracy is at unprecedented levels. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Because of dwindling markets caused by piracy and changing tastes, record companies slash local production budgets even further. </li></ul>
  47. 47. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Enter the alternative bands. Able to record with smaller budgets, they dominate the music scene. </li></ul>
  48. 48. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Record companies grapple with even more dwindling markets, high costs, piracy and sponsor less and less recordings. Each year, less and less albums are released </li></ul>
  49. 49. Dekada 90s <ul><li>Independent producers or “Indies” enter the scene to fill the gap. </li></ul>
  50. 50. Dekada 90s <ul><li>The gap is not really filled. The music recording scene is but a shadow of what it was in its hey days in the 70s and 80s. </li></ul>
  51. 51. The last 5 years <ul><li>The Age </li></ul><ul><li>of the </li></ul><ul><li>Bands </li></ul>
  52. 52. <ul><li>More varied sounds coming out compared to the 5 years before </li></ul><ul><li>OPM band music in rock is very popular </li></ul><ul><li>Revivals continue </li></ul><ul><li>New avenues for music dissemination are available, e.g. Ringtones, youtube, internet, etc.. </li></ul>
  53. 53. <ul><li>-Piracy is stronger than ever and actually eats up almost 30 to 40% of the market. </li></ul><ul><li>-OPM is nowhere near crashing into the world-music scene in any significant way. </li></ul>
  54. 54. So what is wrong and how can we fix it?
  55. 55. What went wrong? <ul><li>1) Radio and TV “reformatting” at the start of the 80s constricted the growth of OPM </li></ul>
  56. 56. What went wrong? <ul><li>2) Lack of commitment from record companies, artists to develop and pursue OPM started in the 70s </li></ul>
  57. 57. What went wrong? <ul><li>Lack of political will to curb piracy </li></ul>
  58. 58. What can we do?
  59. 59. ENCOURAGE OPM MUSIC IN ALL ASPECTS AND ALL WAYS. FOR STARTERS…
  60. 60. <ul><li>1) Change radio and TV formats to allow greater access to many types of OPM, not just those that conform to certain genres. </li></ul>
  61. 61. <ul><li>2) Artists, audience and record companies must recommit to creating and promoting more OPM material </li></ul>
  62. 62. <ul><li>3) Minimize if not totally eradicate the scourge of piracy </li></ul>
  63. 63. OPM and World Markets
  64. 64. <ul><li>Almost every Filipino songwriter and artist has always dreamed of making it big both here and abroad. </li></ul>
  65. 65. <ul><li>We have traditionally followed the </li></ul><ul><li>Two Streams Approach </li></ul>
  66. 66. The Two Streams of OPM <ul><li>OPM in Filipino for Filipinos </li></ul><ul><li>OPM in English for the world </li></ul>
  67. 67. <ul><li>If the aim is to make it big in the world, </li></ul><ul><li>What is the best strategy? </li></ul>
  68. 68. How the rest of the world did it and continues to do so.
  69. 69. Look around us
  70. 70. <ul><li>The Brazillians gave the world “samba” and “bossa” </li></ul><ul><li>The Jamaicans gave reggae, ska </li></ul>
  71. 71. <ul><li>The Latinos gave the latin beats—salsa, merengue, tango, chacha, etc </li></ul><ul><li>Cuba has influenced Western music in a major way. </li></ul>
  72. 72. <ul><li>Australian Aborigines have their own digeridoo sound </li></ul><ul><li>Africans have their wild beats and percussions </li></ul><ul><li>Indonesians have the Gamelan sound </li></ul>
  73. 73. <ul><li>India gave the world its music and Bollywood </li></ul><ul><li>Ireland gave us Celtic music </li></ul>
  74. 74. <ul><li>Even Mongolia has its Tuva singers who have made their mark in the world with “Throat singing” </li></ul>
  75. 75. The point is every nationality that contributes to world culture leaves a distinct mark—themselves! What they ARE is their theme. They don’t try to be anything else.
  76. 76. We seem to be an exemption in this.
  77. 77. <ul><li>We try hard to be “international” by attempting to build on American popular music. In the process, we abandon what is unique about us. </li></ul>
  78. 78. We try to “respond” by attempting to give the market what we think it will go for.
  79. 79. <ul><li>Historically, this strategy has not produced anything that has put us on the map. </li></ul>
  80. 80. On the contrary, the only two Filipino songs that made it in the world or at least are recognizable in other countries are in Tagalog. They are “ Anak ” and “ Dahil Sayo ”
  81. 81. The better strategy for OPM to contribute to world music is this:
  82. 82. <ul><li>Create a Filipino sound (or sounds) by encouraging ALL types of music to be written in Filipino. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow songs to have access to media. </li></ul>
  83. 83. There is no question that we as a people have the talent (hardware) to succeed. We just have to develop a truly Filipino cultural content (software).
  84. 84. Advice to creators of music <ul><li>Write for your milieu. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Magpakatotoo ka” </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t stop creating! </li></ul>
  85. 85. <ul><li>To be global, one must be local </li></ul>
  86. 86. The best, most realistic and sustainable strategy for OPM to become international therefore is this: Create Filipino music for Filipinos!
  87. 87. <ul><li>Only when we focus in creating music that represents who we really are will the world take notice. </li></ul>
  88. 88. END

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