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PARCC-ELA

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Training video for GTPS staff on PARCC in ELA.

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PARCC-ELA

  1. 1. A Day in the PARCC
  2. 2. Get Yer’ Program, Here! Can’t tell one acronym from the next without yer program.
  3. 3. P. 1 Abbreviations
  4. 4. P. 2 Blueprints PARCC Test Blueprints
  5. 5. Section I – The Literary Analysis Task Part A – Reading Long Fiction Passage: prose, poem, or drama Grades 3-5: up to 800 words Grades 6-8: up to 1000 words 1. Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) two part question 2. Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR) graphic organizers 3. Vocabulary Questions Packet p. 3
  6. 6. Section I – The Literary Analysis Task Part B—Reading Short Fiction Passage: prose, poem, drama, video or audio Grades 3-5: 200-400 words Grades 6-8: 400-600 words 1. Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) 2. Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR) 3. Vocabulary Questions Packet p. 3
  7. 7. Section I – The Literary Analysis Task Part C-Writing - Theme (4-8) You have just read two texts, (name them). Write an essay that • identifies a theme in both stories and explains how the theme is shown through the characters (or speaker if a poem) • compares and contrasts the approaches each text uses to develop a given theme. • identifies a theme from each text and analyzes how each theme is developed. • identifies and explains a theme that is similar in both passages. Packet p. 3
  8. 8. Section I – The Literary Analysis Task Part C-Writing – Characterization & Structure You have just read two texts (name them) Write an essay that  explains how the characters’ words and actions are important to the plots of the stories.  describes how the events in both texts did not happen exactly as the narrators expected and how the narrators’ points of view influence how the events happen.  analyzes how each author creates tension in both stories.  analyzes the different approaches the authors take to develop the characters. Be sure to include specific details from both selections. Packet p. 3
  9. 9. The Literary Analysis Pilot 3-5 On Pilot (rumored) Grade 3  Characterization in a story  Author’s study Grade 4 & 5 Analysis of structural elements  Central Idea (Theme)/Lesson of literature  Character(s), setting(s) or event(s)  Author’s study Not On Pilot (rumored) Grade 3  Analysis of the contribution of illustrations  Author’s study including analysis of illustration Grade 4  Connecting a text and a companion visual or oral presentation of that text Grade 5  Analysis of visual and multimedia elements
  10. 10. The Literary Analysis Pilot 6-8 On Pilot (rumored) Grade 6  Theme, setting or plot -‐  Central Idea/Lesson of literature  Analysis of Plot and Characterization  Comparing themes and topics Grade 7 & 8 (also)  Influence of narrator’s or speaker’s point of view  Interaction of story elements Not On Pilot (rumored)  Contribution of one section to theme, setting or plot -‐  Comparing a print text to a multimedia version of that text  Effect of dialogue
  11. 11. The Key Words  analyze  compare and contrast  describe  explain  Classroom practice and directions should clearly point out what these key words mean.  The bottom line: Students have to find similarities and/or differences in 2 texts.
  12. 12. Suggestions  Directions in the classroom should be more extensive so kids keep these in mind regardless of the directions on the day of the test. This way they will know what to write about and how.  On the day of the test, the directions might give them the theme (or claim) or they will have to identify it. Therefore, it is better to provide practice in doing both.
  13. 13. Lit Analysis Prompt (4-8) p. 4 handout
  14. 14. Sample Shared Writing Lesson Approach: 1. Use PARCC formatted directions. 2. Have groups respond in note form on easel paper. 3. Create a master list from all group contributions. 4. Write a Master Essay where the teacher writes choosing the best contributions. 5. Kids copy and save to use as an exemplar for future assignments.
  15. 15. Other Elements In addition to theme, characterization and structure, prepare for essays on other elements.  Pick two texts that have a similarity or difference:  Point of view  Character development  Character relationships  Character reactions
  16. 16. Writing Checklist p. 5 handout
  17. 17. Writing Rubric p. 6 handout
  18. 18. Heads In, Bottoms Up  Identify a similar theme, characterization or structure in both stories and analyze how it is developed in each text.  Think about how the texts are similar and how they are different.  Gr. 6 The School Play / All Summer in a Day  Gr. 7 Seventh Grade / The Last Dog  Gr. 8 Raymond’s Run / The Ransom of Red Chief  Gr. 3 Charlie McButton / What about Me  Gr. 4 Because of Winn Dixie / Lewis and Clark and Me  Gr. 5 Red Kayak / Thunder Rose Online timer to RST restart
  19. 19. Section II – The Research Simulation Task (RST AKA DBQ ) Part A – Reading Passage 1  Long Nonfiction Passage: article, speech, argument, opinion, biography, court case * work in some primary sources 1. Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) 2. Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR) 3. Vocabulary Questions p. 7 handout
  20. 20. Section II – The Research Simulation Task Part B – Reading Passage 2 Short Nonfiction Passage: article, speech, argument, opinion, biography, court case 1. Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) 2. Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR) 3. Vocabulary Questions p. 7 handout
  21. 21. Section II – The Research Simulation Task Part C – Reading Passage 3 Short Nonfiction Passage or Video Clip 1. Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) 2. Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR) 3. Vocabulary Questions p. 7 handout
  22. 22. Section II – The Research Simulation Task Part D –Writing The Research Simulation Task - SCIENTIFIC-RELATED (animals, environment, chemistry, archeology) You have read two texts (name them) and viewed a video entitled (name it). In an essay • describe the roles of animals and humans in a process or procedure • compare how each source describes the roles of animals and humans in a process or procedure • identify a similar claim in the sources and then compare and contrast the evidence each source uses • compare the purposes of each source then analyze how each source uses information and evidence • compare and contrast the information in the texts with the information in the video • examine and/or delineate a phenomenon p. 7 handout
  23. 23. Section II – The Research Simulation Task Part D –Writing The Research Simulation Task for HISTORY-RELATED or ARGUMENT/OPINION • compare and contrast a primary argument in each text • explore author’s purpose Part D –Writing The Research Simulation Task for COURT CASE • analyze how effectively the arguments are presented for each side Remember to use evidence from all three (or at least two) sources to support your ideas p. 7 handout
  24. 24. Synthesis Sources should have a conversation with each other. p. 8 handout
  25. 25. How could this look using our ELA/SS/Sci materials? You have read two texts (name them) and viewed a video entitled (name it). EX. • describe the roles of animals and humans in a process or procedure • compare how each source describes the roles of animals and humans in a process or procedure • identify a similar claim in the sources and then compare and contrast the evidence each source uses • compare the purposes of each source then analyze how each source uses information and evidence • compare and contrast the information in the texts with the information in the video • examine and/or delineate a phenomenon
  26. 26. RST - Heads In, Bottoms Up You have read two texts (name them) and viewed a video entitled (name it). • describe… • compare how each source describes … • identify a similar claim in the sources and then compare and contrast… • compare the purposes of each source then analyze how each source uses information • compare and contrast the information in the texts with the information in the video • examine and/or delineate a phenomenon  Gr. 6 Unit 1 – Weather That’s Out of This World! / Space Settlements / Artist’s Views of A Space Colony (or use p. 85 prompt)  Gr. 7 Unit 8 – Like Black Smoke: The Black Death’s Journey / A World Turned Upside Down: How the Black Death Affected Europe  Gr. 8 Unit 8 - Robo-Legs / Eureka: Scientific Twists of Fate  Gr. 3 Unit 1 Week 4 – Supermarket / Money from Long Ago (How do we learn to make our way in the world?)  Gr. 4 Unit 1 Week 5 – Letters Home from Yosemite / The Bison of Caprock Canyons (What can we learn from exploring new places and things?)  Gr. 5 Unit 1 Week 2 Night of the Tornados Read Aloud / Measuring Tornadoes / GR (What kinds of challenges do people face and how do they meet them?)
  27. 27. Section III – The Narrative Task Part A – Reading Passage 1 Short or long fiction or nonfiction passage 1. Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR) 2. Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) p. 9 handout
  28. 28. Section III – The Narrative Task Part B—Writing The Narrative Task for the FICTION TEXT You have read (name the text). • Write a journal entry from the character (name him or her) about what happened in the story. • Write a narrative story retelling the story from the point of view of (name the character). • Write an original short story that describes what (name the character) does next. Think about the details the author uses to create the characters, settings, and events in the story and use these as a guide in writing your own narrative. p. 9 handout
  29. 29. Section III – The Narrative Task Part B—Writing The Narrative Task (Continued) for the FICTION TEXT • Write a continuation of the story using details from the story you just read. • Write a narrative story that describes the major events in the passage from the point of view of (name the character—it could even be a character that was not in the story but was suggested in the story). • Write a narrative story that describes what the character (name the character) does and the experiences she or he has. p. 9 handout
  30. 30. Section III – The Narrative Task Part B—Writing The Narrative Task for the NON-FICTION TEXT You have just read an article on (a scientific or historical event) with a short personal introduction. • Write an original short story from the perspective of (name a person from the short personal introduction). Be sure to include details (scientific or historical) in your original short story. p. 9 handout
  31. 31. Test Talk Increasing success on EBSRs and TECRs http://www.flocabulary.com/test-taking-vocabulary/
  32. 32. The EBSR - Part A Q. On the PARRC multiple choice questions, how many right answers are there? A. Four… B. One is best  Students will also be required to negotiate plausible, text-‐based distractors
  33. 33. Q. Who was the first president of the United States? A. B. C. D. Q. What WRONG answers would you expect?
  34. 34. Q. Who was the first president of the United States? A. Martha Washington’s husband B. G. Washington C. General Washington D. The man who commanded the American Revolutionary army
  35. 35. In addition to teaching reading and writing, we must also teach the thinking process needed to find the best answer.
  36. 36. Q. Why did the Big Bad Wolf disguise himself as Little Red Riding Hood’s grandmother? A. It was easy for the wolf to put on a gray wig, nightcap, and nightgown. B. He wanted to play a joke on Little Red Riding Hood. C. He wanted to fool Little Red Riding Hood like he did before. D. It was a way of luring her into a false sense of security. E. The wolf arrived at the grandmother’s house before Little Red Riding Hood did.
  37. 37. Every answer choice will be one of the following: • a totally false statement which will still use words from the passage • a partially false and partially true statement which uses words from the passage • a logical conclusion but something that is not supported in the passage • a totally true statement that does not answer the question • a totally true statement that answers the question and may very well use synonyms
  38. 38. Eliminate the distractors Q. Why did the Big Bad Wolf disguise himself as Little Red Riding Hood’s grandmother?  Step 1. Review the story  Step 2. Cross out any answer choices that are totally false  Step 3. Circle the words in any answer choice that make it partially false..  Step 4. Cross out any answer choice that is a true statement but does not answer the question.  Step 5. Cross out any answer choice that is a logical conclusion but is not supported in the passage. A. It was easy for the wolf to put on a gray wig, nightcap, and nightgown. B. He wanted to play a joke on Little Red Riding Hood. C. He wanted to fool Little Red Riding Hood like he did before. D. It was a way of luring her into a false sense of security. E. The wolf arrived at the grandmother’s house before Little Red Riding Hood did.
  39. 39. Eliminate the distractors – Cont. Q. Why did the Big Bad Wolf disguise himself as Little Red Riding Hood’s grandmother?  Step 6. Locate the correct answer to the question using words and phrases from the text. “…so the wolf would be able to get close to Little Red Riding Hood.”  Step 7. Circle the synonym(s) in the best answer that means something close to the words you picked out of the text to answer the question. “lure into a false sense of security”
  40. 40. From PARCC Gr. 3 EBSR Question Part A. A. True statement but does not answer the question B. Logical conclusion but not supported in the text C. Partially true and partially false D. Correct
  41. 41. How Vocabulary Questions Are Asking For More Than Definitions  “One should not underestimate the value of any meaningful encounter with a word, even if the encounter with a word is relatively small.” (Nagy and Herman)
  42. 42. Part B is always asking for evidence. Otherwords for evidence: • Word • Phrase • Sentence • Paraphrase • Quotations • Details from text Part B (gr 7) Which phrase from Blessings best helps the reader to understand the meaning of scale? Part B (gr.7) Which sentence from “Energy Story” best supports the answer in Part A?
  43. 43. A TECR Gr. 8 Question from PARCC Click and Drag Brian’s Winter, Gary Paulsen
  44. 44. Additional Resources 1. Compiled List of PBA Components pp. 10-11 2. Performance Coach Samples * 3. PARCC 6-8 Model and Practice – Fare Text - Table of Contents * & p. 21 4. PARCC-like Lessons Table of Contents Reading Street* p. 12 Holt* p.13 5. https://snapshot.edmodo.com/landing - Online assessment tool. Click here for tutorial. 6. Discovery Streaming (on tech page of our website) 7. “Effective Writing” Article – A worthy read from Jeff Anderson p. 14 8. “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Decode Text Types” Article – A good read pp. 15-16 9. Close Reading Cheat Sheet – Student bookmark p. 17 10. Transitions – list of transition words p. 18 11. Standards Progression for Writing Sample Gr 5/6 * 12. Roller Coaster Example of Writing Progression – K to HS progression of student response to a singular prompt pp. 19-20 13. CCSS Appendix A-C * 14. This PPT will be linked to our ELA homepage * Supplemented with documents saved in X:/grade __/English Language Arts/PARCC Resources
  45. 45. Poster Activity How will PARCC Impact: 1. Questioning 2. Choice of Texts 3. Writing Instruction 4. Small Group (GR) Instruction 5. Assessment 6. Pacing 7. 20-270-200-100-00-SA Draft of Pacing 14-15
  46. 46. Modeled and Practice PBA Lessons for PARCC ELA Literary Analysis Narrative Writing Task Research Simulation Task Grade 6 pp. 32-41 “The Road Not Taken” & Dragonwings pp. 98-103 Alice In Wonderland pp. 64-79 School Uniforms pp. 112-115 A Wrinkle in Time pp. 233-243 Bullying Grade 7 pp. 140-157 “The World’s Reward” &”Caged Bird” pp. 193-217 Space Exploration pp. 218-225 Native American Contributions Grade 8 pp. 47-58 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer—Chap. 2 pp. 247-259 Segregation pp. 41-46 “A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long” & “O Captain! My Captain!” pp. 105-107 Little Women pp. 226-232 African American Literary Experience pp. 158-165 “The Road Not Taken” & Tom Sawyer—Chap. 9 pp. 108-111 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer—Introduction
  47. 47. Standards Progression
  48. 48. Draft of Pacing 14-15 Grades 3 -5 Grades 6 - 7 Grade 8 Month Unit/Week Month Unit Month Unit Sep Baseline and U1 Wk 1-3 / Narrative Sep Unit 1 Plot, Conflict & Setting / Narrative Sep Unit 1 Plot, Conflict & Setting / Narrative Oct U1 Wk 4-6 & U2 Wk 1 / Narrative Oct Unit 2 Characters and POV / Narrative Oct Unit 2 Characters and POV / Narrative Nov U2 Wk 2-4 / Literary Analysis Nov Unit 3 Theme / Literary Analysis Nov Unit 3 Theme / Literary Analysis Dec U2 Wk 5-6 / Literary Analysis Dec Unit 3 Theme / Literary Analysis Dec Unit 4 Imagery and Style / Literary Analysis Jan U 3 Wk 1-4 / RST Jan Unit 8 Argument / RST Jan Unit 9 Argument / RST Feb U 3 Wk 5-6 & U 4 Wk 1 / RST Feb Unit 4 Imagery and Style / Literary Analysis Feb Unit 8 Informational / RST / Holocaust Mar U 4 Wk 2-4 (PARCC PBA) Mar Unit 5 Poetry / Literary Analysis (PARCC PBA) Mar Unit 5 Poetry / Literary Analysis (PARCC PBA) Apr U 4 Wk 5-6 & U 5 Wk 1 Apr Unit 6 Myths, Legends, and Tales / Narrative Apr Unit 6 Myths, Legends, and Tales May U 5 Wk 2-4, EOY testing, (PARCC EOY) May Unit 7 Bio - and Auto / RST May Unit 7History, Culture Author Jun U 5 Wk 5-6 Jun Unit (PARCC EOY) Jun Unit (PARCC EOY)

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