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Featuring authorsA fresh, entertaining series of pocket books that feature        ANELE MDODAprominent young South African...
EDITED BYMANDY                                Gin & Tonic with a Splash of CranberryWIENER                   That’s my dri...
@ anele                                                          IT FEELS WRONG TO LAUGHT, BUT ...    I don’t like unneces...
One of the harshest realisations of fame is that                             the critics don’t stop at tearing into your c...
@ dannykmusic                                                                    TAKE IT FROM ME     to demonstrate that t...
EDITED BYMANDY                                         Many young black South Africans carryWIENER                        ...
@ khayadlanga                                                          IN MY ARROGANT OPINION     levels of crime in South...
The hardest thing about South African history                                                 is getting ­ eople to agree ...
@ nikrabinowitz                                                         A LONG WALK TO A FREE RIDE     place, beset by rac...
EDITED BY                   One day my little girl, then three, and quiteMANDY                           keen on simply dr...
@ shakasisulu                                                                      BECOMING     had nothing to do with her...
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The Youngsters Sample Material

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A fresh, entertaining series of pocket books that feature prominent young South African voices worth listening to.

The Youngsters series explores topics of interest to the youth, ranging from hair weaves to discovering who you are and what you should do with your life, as well as issues of race and gender, love and sex in the time of social networks, the music and radio industries, comedy, empowering yourself and more … The series shares the naked reality of being a youngster in South Africa and helps you to make sense of it all.

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The Youngsters Sample Material

  1. 1. Featuring authorsA fresh, entertaining series of pocket books that feature ANELE MDODAprominent young South African voices worth listening to. DANNY KThe Youngsters series explores topics of interest to the KHAYA DLANGAyouth, ranging from hair weaves to discovering who you NIK RABINOWITZare and what you should do with your life, as well asissues of race and gender, love and sex in the time of SHAKA SISULUsocial networks, the music and radio industries, comedy,empowering yourself and more … The series shares the SERIES IS EDITED BYnaked reality of being a youngster in South Africa and BESTSELLING AUTHOR ANDhelps you to make sense of it all. AWARD-WINNING JOURNALIST MANDY WIENER 3
  2. 2. EDITED BYMANDY Gin & Tonic with a Splash of CranberryWIENER That’s my drink. And I think it says a lot about me. WHO ARE YOU? I’m not saying your drink is who you are, but knowing your drink is part of knowing yourself. The process of finding the tastes you like, whilst you’re there deciding what you drink – surely you should also be finding out things about yourself. For example, am I studying law because I want to be a law-ANELE yer or because I like Ally McBeal/The Practice? Or is being a doctor your calling or do you want to find McDreamy? Also knowing what you should stay away from is just as important.MDODA Does tequila on the rocks make you dance on the table? If that’s your thing, then go ahead. If not, it may be best to step away. I personally don’t like beer and in university it was just soIt Feels Wrong cool for girls to drink beer. One of the years there was a wave of pretty chicks drinking beer, so know that deciding againstto Laugh, But … it was part of forming not only my independence but also for- tifying an opinion I would stand for. For one thing, I don’t like yeast unless it’s in a loaf of bread. Beer makes me burp and 5
  3. 3. @ anele IT FEELS WRONG TO LAUGHT, BUT ... I don’t like unnecessary burping. As unruly as I think I may you have to. You saw the table next to you have a Jam Jar be, I don’t like unladylike behaviour and as such, not only and it’s just easy to go along with hooraying to the colourful because of my knock-knees, I shy away from pants. I can just mixture, with too many straws, in front of you. hear the feminist’s … Urgh, leave me alone and please use My point is, everything you’re doing should be a series of a coaster. It is who I am and I’m unapologetic about these choices – leading to the next choice – you can’t just fall into things that make me me. things, everything is a sum of choices. Fate favours the pre- I don’t do cocktails – I like guarantees. Cocktails just pared. Fortune favours the brave. The brave know who they don’t know what they want to be in life, being a jack-of-all- are and what they stand for. trades and master of none. Think about a Long Island Ice Let’s say cheers to that. Tea: vodka, tequila, rum, gin, triple sec, sweet and sour mix, Coca-Cola. All these different tastes coming together and not going anywhere without each other. It has so much going on and no clear direction, but because there’s so much of it, it feels safe to kick your sobriety out of the way. ‘I am not my gap, but I own it. I am not my size, but I own it and you can’t use what you see as a negative against me. I own me and proudly so.’ – Anele Mdoda That was something I hated in university; the whole let’s go together somewhere even though we have our own cars. Carving her own path in radio, Anele Mdoda is known as one irreplaceable half I can hear the green people moaning we should be saving of The Grant & Anele Show on 5FM and, from April 2012, on the Drive Time show the world. Building your independence is a part of university; on Highveld Stereo. A talker, a comic, honest and raw, Anele discusses everything why then would we happily not celebrate that independence. from radio to hair weaves and owning your size in It Feels Wrong to Laugh, But … And I have no idea what’s in a Jam Jar (who the fuck knows Twitter Handle: @Anele what’s in those, only it knows), nor do I like the way the wait- June 2012 | Non-fiction (Youth) | Paperback (148 x 128 mm) |128 pp ers look at me as they serve it to me. 978-1-77010-247-7 | Rights: World |Available as an eBook 978-1-77010-252-1 Anyway, just because everyone is doing it, doesn’t mean6 7
  4. 4. One of the harshest realisations of fame is that the critics don’t stop at tearing into your career; they delve into your dirty laundry too.DANNY I’m sure everyone has heard the gossip regarding my rela- tionship with Lee-Ann Liebenberg; I can honestly say I wasn’t prepared for the amount of publicity we would get. During the time we were together, we literally became public property and I was seen as being famous purely for whom I was dating. Take It I blame myself for the media circus our relationship became. My naivety and blind faith that it would all work out had me From Me digging my own grave. I’ve learnt the hard way to be more discreet and measured about my public life. People saw me as a poser, and I wasn’t taken very seri- ously for being a musician even though I’d worked so hard over the years to produce albums that would prove differ- ently. After four albums I still felt myself having to prove my worth to everyone. During the rocky parts of our relationship, I was spending a lot of time in London recording my latest album, Across the Line. I had become very frustrated with so- EDITED BY cial commentary regarding my career and I was determined MANDY WIENER 9
  5. 5. @ dannykmusic TAKE IT FROM ME to demonstrate that the criticism was unfounded. seen what fame can do to people; it’s in the media every single I find it strange how criticism affects people differently. I’ve day. There isn’t much that can prepare you for that, but finding always been one to pretend it has no effect on me, when in a balance can really make all the difference in the world. all honesty, I never forget what’s been said. I think it subcon- Take It From Me: sciously filters down into some of the decisions I make, some- ❑ Never let praise go to your head and never let criticism times positively and sometimes negatively. On the one hand, go to your heart. I’ll work harder because of it but on the other, I’ll always try ❑ Be honest enough with yourself to listen to criticism. to win people over and change their minds about me, even ❑ If you can’t let it go, you can’t move on. though I know that most of the time I won’t succeed. ❑ Have a place where you can be yourself I’ve always felt that I’ve had to prove I’m deserving of my ❑ Don’t let the hate consume you, keep believing in fame; deserving of my career. I’ve never really felt like an artist yourself. … or a musician; I’m constantly proving and re-proving that I can do this. I don’t think I really give myself credit in my own mind, and with this last album I was determined to do something so ‘They say there’s no business like show business. And that’s not because of the fame, or the money. It’s because of just how hard it can be.’ – Danny K different that people could see that there was enough talent in the songwriting and production ability to do anything. Take It From Me records the ups and downs of the career path of South African To keep yourself sane in an industry that can be so ment­ singer, songwriter, actor and producer, Danny K. A performer from a young age, ally taxing, is to have the ability to divorce yourself from your Danny K talks about the good, the bad and the ugly of the music business, his public persona. When I’m at home I’m just Danny; I don’t have influences and how rejection can sometimes pay off. anything that will tell you I’m a singer. There are no pictures Twitter Handle: @dannykmusic of me on stage, no posters, no tour memorabilia. I think it’s June 2012 | Non-fiction (Youth) | Paperback (148 x 128 mm) | 128 pp important to be able to let go in a place where you feel safe, 978-1-77010-248-4 | Rights: World | Available as an eBook 978-1-77010-253-8 where you don’t have to prove anything to anyone. We’ve all10 11
  6. 6. EDITED BYMANDY Many young black South Africans carryWIENER around bitterness towards their fathers for a variety of reasons. One of the major reasons is because their fathers have been fathers in name only, and not in actions. The only thing they seem expert in is making babies – and then abandoning them. I have heard many people simply call their fathers sperm donors. I have heard people refer to their fathers as ‘that thing’. The great bitterness towards fathers has less to do with hate than deep-seated disappointment. It is because they know what fathers are supposed to do. When they don’t do what they are meant to, bitterness sets in. But this does notKHAYA mean that they hate their fathers. A myriad of contradictory feelings settle upon many children directed at their fathers. A large number of black fathers should be ashamed ofDLANGA themselves. They have not taken responsibility after enjoying some hanky panky. They are like gangbangers in projects in the United States when gang violence was rife, and drive- bys. They practise what one could call bang-bys. It is no co-In My Arrogant Opinion incidence then that one of the reasons we experience high 13
  7. 7. @ khayadlanga IN MY ARROGANT OPINION levels of crime in South Africa is precisely because fathers 70% of the black children had fathers who were not around. have abdicated their duties as men. The greatest crime that They were there but they were missing. Not in a ‘Let’s file a has been committed against black South African children missing person’s report’ manner, they just didn’t live at home has to be that of fathers abandoning their children. In fact, with their children. Most of these children might as well have I don’t know if a large section of black fathers deserves the been raised by single parents, their mothers … honour of being called men at all. ‘Boys’ would be more ap- propriate considering the behaviour of many of our fathers. This is not meant to take anything away from the many ‘This book isn’t about anything in particular. I know that sounds a little disturbing, but hear me out. I think that those people who read my work read it precisely because great fathers who know what it means to be a man. Those there is no particular pattern; they read it to find out what I have to say. Essentially I men who look after and show their children through actions am like them. I am a conversationalist. I write like people talk. No fancy language; nor as well words that they love them. Some fathers think that do I show how smart I am.’ – Khaya Dlanga throwing money at their children is being a father. We all know that they do this to avoid confronting the fact that they Award-winning blogger and advertising guy who never eats black jelly babies haven’t been fathers. Money will never take the place of an Khaya Dlanga discusses issues of racism, love and sex, money, gender and a range of things in between. Khaya’s humour mixed with opinion is a recipe guaranteed absent father. Children want their fathers to be around more to make you think and laugh out loud. than they want their father’s money. Khaya Dlanga is a Senior Communications Manager: Content Excellence at According to AMPS, 65% of women in South Africa with ba- Coca-Cola South Africa. He writes in his personal capacity. He is a winner of the bies under the age of two are single (never married and not prestigious Cannes Gold and Black Eagle advertising awards. He is also a terror of living together). In 2006, this proportion was 50%. Obviously the social networks. there is a serious underlying problem with society. Towning Twitter Handle: @khayadlanga and running. June 2012 | Non-fiction (Youth) | Paperback (148 x 128 mm) | 128 pp When I was in high school I noticed that a large portion of 978-1-77010-246-0 | Rights: World | Available as an eBook 978-1-77010-251-4 black children had absent fathers. In one of my classes over14 15
  8. 8. The hardest thing about South African history is getting ­ eople to agree on it. p ‘Oh great,’ you’re probably thinking, ‘a history lesson. I have bigger things to worry about. Why should I care about an- cient history when the present is changing all the time?’ Our generation is all about change: regime changes, party changes, road name changes, province changes, Facebook status update changes. History books get changed accord- ing to who is in power, so we don’t know where we’re coming& GILLIAN BRESLIN from. Newspapers are censored and sanitised, so we don’t know where we stand. Twitter and Facebook are no use be- cause they are full of people who lie and can’t spell. And theSOUTH AFRICA future is uncertain, so we don’t know where we’re going. But A Long Walk to sometimes, knowing where you came from can help you to figure out where you are going. Or at the very least, help you a Free Ride to win at Trivial Pursuit. It may come as a surprise to you that South Africa was not always the raceless, classless utopia you see in beer EDITED BY adverts. Once upon a time this was a dark and dangerous MANDY WIENER 17
  9. 9. @ nikrabinowitz A LONG WALK TO A FREE RIDE place, beset by racism and violence. Like America, but with Then evolution happened. Unless you don’t believe in elephants. evolution, in which case God made some new and improved So what happened? How did we get from primitive violent humans. racists to sophisticated violent racists? If you were educated prior to 1990, you might remember learning that the noble According to these two youngsters, ‘The hardest thing about South African history is Boers and long-suffering British people were beset by prob- getting people to agree on it.’ lems caused by the bloodthirsty black tribes. That isn’t really a big theme in post-1990 teaching. So A fast-paced, hilarious guide to surviving your youth in South Africa. Expect a we are here to set the record straight. This is the true, una- history lesson with a difference, what makes a comedian tick, some alternative political insights and thoughtful crystal-ball gazing. Join Nik Rabinowitz and bridged version of South African history. Gillian Breslin on a side-splitting journey to discover the ‘real’ South Africa. Prehistory Nik Rabinowitz was raised on the mean, green streets of Constantia, Cape Town, a world of ride-bys, piano lessons, and unrelenting love and financial support from Millions of years ago, there were tiny, hairy hominids roam- family members. Despite all this hardship he still managed to be moderately suc- ing the West Rand of Joburg. This is still true, but the original cessful, achieving fame as the world’s foremost Xhosa-speaking Jewish comedian. hairy hominids had not yet invented the wheel, let alone the Gillian Breslin obtained a Journalism Degree from Rhodes University, but tow-truck. These original hominids were the missing link – quickly realised that writing is much easier when you get to make stuff up. After the precursors to all mankind. We don’t know much about a brief stint as ‘The World’s Worst Producer’ she started writing for television, and these guys, but we do know that they were incredibly clumsy, hasn’t looked back since (mostly because that’s where the creditors are). Gillian because we keep finding their bones down holes and in old and Nik have been working together since 2008. riverbeds. Since we don’t find many bones we assume they Twitter Handle: @nikrabinowitz were either incredibly good at decomposing or they ate each June 2012 | Non-fiction (Youth) | Paperback (148 x 128 mm) | 128 pp other. We are going with cannibalism, since every good story 978-1-77010-249-1 | Rights: World | Available as an eBook 978-1-77010-254-5 needs a bit of cannibalism …18 19
  10. 10. EDITED BY One day my little girl, then three, and quiteMANDY keen on simply driving around with me,WIENER reached over to the radio, turned it off and looked me squarely in the eye. We were at a traffic light so she had my full attention. She then asked me very pointed questions about the nature of my relationship with her mother. Stunned, I waded through the inquisition as honestly as I could. When she was satisfied, she simply nodded, looked briefly into the distance and then turned on the radio again. Within moments she was happily chatting about something or the other that had captured her imagination.SHAKA Something happened in those few moments. She had held me to account in a way that I allowed very few people to do. Not only that, her questions reminded me of the role I was playing in determining what sort of romantic relation-SISULU ships she herself would be predisposed to pursuing. There remains no doubt in my mind that daughters find their fa- thers to love, or spend their lives searching for him. WhetherBecoming I liked it or not, I was directly influencing the quality of her adult life through my actions, even if I felt that certain things 21
  11. 11. @ shakasisulu BECOMING had nothing to do with her or were none of her business. You pouring myself into the sort of activities (with Cheesekids, for know, parenting begins when each decision we make for example) that would later lead to people pointing me out as ourselves considers the souls in our care for safekeeping. I having leadership qualities. I suppose flawed characters have said that my daughter has raised me. Partially because with Damascene experiences present the most appealing of her, Bond had to go. candidates for leadership; we want to follow folks who have * * * escaped their circumstances. Back in Oxford, having reflected on all that I have shared ‘By three methods we may learn wisdom: with you, I then asked myself who it was that had replaced First, by reflection, which is the noblest; Bond? Who was my new idol? I remember smiling, it was Second, by imitation, which is the easiest; an easy answer ... one that I will share with you in the next and Third by experience, which is the bitterest.’ chapter … Confucius (551–479 BC) In the years since, I’ve more often than not opted for bitter experience to spur me into turning my back on my Bond. My ‘There is a poetic justice to life because we are the sum of our experiences.’ – Shaka Sisulu break-up with alcohol after a 19 year (yeah, really) relation- ship followed my imitation of Judge Motala. In my moment of Grandson of anti-apartheid stalwart Walter Sisulu, CEO of non-profit organisation clarity I finally understood what ‘the good life, an enemy of Cheesekids, creator, dreamer, father and devoted Afrikan, Shaka Sisulu discusses a great life’ meant. I decided there and then to conquer my heritage, BEE, inspiration, leadership, legacy and how you can carve your own vices one by one. I was not just leaving Bond, now I was out destiny in the Afrikan soil in Becoming. to kill him. Twitter Handle: @shakasisulu There is a poetic justice to life because we are the sum of June 2012 | Non-fiction (Youth) | Paperback (148 x 128 mm) | 128 pp our experiences. I am sure that had it not been for this pro- 978-1-77010-250-7 | Rights: World | Available as an eBook 978-1-77010-255-2 cess of transition, even unwitting, I wouldn’t have found myself22 23

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