About The Birkman Method ®  -  1951 to today <ul><li>Developed in the late 1940’s by Dr. Roger Birkman </li></ul><ul><li>C...
About The Birkman Method ®  -  the assessment Behavior generally is predictable if we know how the person perceived the si...
About The Birkman Method ®  -  the assessment 11 scales of BEHAVIORS Not just  “how”  you behave but  “why”  you behave th...
About The Birkman Method ®  -  the assessment 10 scales of INTERESTS Expressed preferences and motivations that measure th...
About The Birkman Method ®  -  the assessment 26 Criterion-Referenced Scales Management Styles Thinking Styles Work Styles...
Applications –  the assessment <ul><li>Hiring / Selection   </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Develo...
Applications –  the assessment So What? <ul><li>Descriptive + Prescriptive </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Awareness + Self-Managem...
<ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Direct Communication Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Life Style Grid ® The Birkman Life Style Grid® captures an overview of the individual. The Life Style Grid® captures the i...
Life Style Grid ® The  represents  Interests . Interests are expressed preferences and motivations that measure the attrac...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
<ul><li>The  represents  Usual  behavior.  </li></ul><ul><li>Usual behavior is  described as the individual’s effective st...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
<ul><li>The  represents  Needs.  </li></ul><ul><li>Needs describe the expectations an individual has of how relationships ...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
<ul><li>To Satisfy the Blue Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend time with individuals who offer  personal reassurance and su...
Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Co...
<ul><li>To Satisfy the Green Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend time in environments which are  action-oriented and have de...
Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Adminis...
<ul><li>To Satisfy the Red Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek relationships which allow for casual and   direct communicatio...
Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Adminis...
<ul><li>To Satisfy the Yellow Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek out environments that provide  structure and specific direc...
<ul><li>The   represents potential behavior that can result when individual needs go unmet over time.  </li></ul><ul><li>S...
Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Adminis...
<ul><li>To Manage  Blue  Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate in a more direct and  logical fashion </li></ul></ul><u...
Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Adminis...
<ul><li>To Manage  Green  Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend time with the details </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use more ca...
Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Adminis...
<ul><li>To Manage  Red  Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Take time for thoughtful reflection  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look...
Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Adminis...
<ul><li>To Manage  Yellow  Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show open enthusiasm about new ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C...
Voor aanvullende informatie en vragen:  Bel: 06-20019957  of mail naar: [email_address]
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Wat houdt de Birkman Methode in (Engels)

1,022 views

Published on

Voor meer informatie kunt u mij bereiken op 06-20019957 of via info@birkmanconsult.nl

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,022
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The developer of The Birkman Method ®, Roger W. Birkman, Ph.D. (1919 - ), began his exploration of individual differences while still a pilot and pilot instructor for the United States Air Force in the 1940s. His experience with the impact perceptions (both visual and interpersonal) had on pilot performance and student learning led him to the study of psychology. Roger Birkman conceptualized, developed, and refined The Birkman Method® as part of his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Texas (in Austin). Ultimately, Dr. Birkman believed he could create a much-needed instrument that would measure social expectations, self-concepts, interests, and stress behavior through a single assessment tool. He further believed that such an instrument would be of great value to both organizations and individuals in selection and development. The original name of the Birkman assessment in 1951 was &amp;quot;Test of Social Comprehension&amp;quot;. Today, Birkman International continues to enhance Dr. Birkman&apos;s original insights and research with ongoing research and development of The Birkman Method®. Its research and development department, working with other psychometricians and industrial/organizational psychologists in universities and industry, continues to refine The Birkman Method® and insure its relevance in the 21st century. [ADMINISTRATION] The Birkman Method® questionnaire and related reports are accessed through the Internet using the proprietary online system, BirkmanDirect® . Using BirkmanDirect®, respondents are emailed a unique link to access the Birkman questionnaire or can be provided a unique password. Respondents complete the 298-item questionnaire over the web. Time to complete the questionnaire averages 30 to 45 minutes. Results are available to the BirkmanDirect® administrator immediately upon questionnaire completion. The consultant can create and print from a variety of report sets from anywhere in the world, to view, print, save to disk or send electronically. A coach has limited access to The Coaching Report. Reports are created in .pdf format - the de facto standard for secure electronic document exchange. [OPTIONAL INFORMATION – Roy B. Mefferd, Ph.D.] In the 1960s, while on the University of Texas campus, Roger was introduced to one Roy B. Mefferd, Ph.D. This meeting was made to introduce Roger to the man who would assist him with the “higher statistics” of The Birkman Method®. Dr. Mefferd was instrumental to increasing the predictive validity (the ability to predict something you want to predict) of the instrument through his expertise in statistics and factor analysis (A form of multivariate analysis that takes a large number of variables or objects and aims to identify a small number of factors that explain the interrelations among the variables or objects.) Dr. Mefferd was a man of broad interests with formal education in agricultural biology, genetics and plant physiology, bacteriology and biochemistry. Interestingly, he held professorships in psychiatry and the behavioral sciences at several universities. He did extensive work with the Veterans Administration (VA) and was at one time professor of psychiatry and physiology at Baylor University. He wrote a multitude of papers for journals and was a leading expert in schizophrenia (although The Birkman Method® is not a measure of personality disorders or pathology; rather, it is a measure of normal adult behavior). Dr. Mefferd was a colleague of H.J. Eysenck (German-born British Psychologist, March 4, 1916 - September 4, 1997; best remembered for his work on intelligence and personality, though he worked in a wide range of areas. At the time of his death, Eysenck was the living psychologist most frequently cited in science journals), with whom he sat on the editorial board of the journal of Psychological Reports . Dr. Mefferd worked with Raymond Cattell, the creator of the 16PF. Cattell spoke of Roy’s “provacative and intensive thinking … at the turning points of scientific history only a few pioneers realize the direction in which things are heading. Dr. Mefferd has been such a pioneer in the no-man’s land between psychology and physiology.” This is the background of the man Roger asked for help with factor analysis.
  • Behavior generally is predictable if we know how the person perceived the situation and what is important to him or her. While people’s behavior may not appear to rational to an outsider, there is reason to believe it usually is intended to be rational and it is seen as rational by them. An observer often sees behavior as non-rational because the observer does not have access to the same information or does not perceive the environment in the same way. Edward E. Lawler III
  • What makes The Birkman Method ® so unique are three (3) dimensions measured through eleven (11) Behavioral Components. These three dimensions of personality are called Usual Behavior, Underlying Needs, and Stress Behavior. The Birkman Method® reports not only “how” you behave, it also reports “why” you behave the way you do. Usual Behavior – describe an individual’s effective style of dealing with relationships and tasks. These behaviors are typically described as positive or effective in manner (though not necessarily in result). Each scale is a bi-polar descriptor of style so that persons with low scale values are described as approaching relationships or tasks in one manner while those with high scale values are described as approaching them in an opposite, but equally effective for that particular individual , manner. The scales under Usual are derived from the Self responses on the Questionnaire and are known to be influenced by perceptions of social desirabilty (the inclination to present oneself in a manner that will be viewed favorably by others). The scaling techniques Birkman uses preserve the underlying skew created by commonly held perceptions of social desirability. Usual Behavior describes style of behavior not level of effectiveness. Usual Behavior occurs for the individual when they feel good about self and situation and when the situation appears to require “good” behavior or when others are expected to judge or evaluate the behavior or results of the behavior. Thus, it is “socially correct” behavior as the individual understands socially correct. Those observing an individual’s Usual Behavior will judge its effectiveness based on their own Underlying Needs. Underlying Needs – describe the expectations an individual has of how relationships and tasks will be governed in a particular situation or relationship regardless of perceived social correctness. These scales are also bi-polar in description and more specifically describe how the individual needs others to act toward them and what types of behaviors the person wants to be required to express for extended periods of time. Thus, The Birkman Method ® draws a distinction between the “socially correct” behavior a person exhibits or perceives and how the person wants to be treated by others. This distinction captures the fact that significant numbers of people “know how to act” in a relationship or task but would prefer not to be required to use that particular style of action for extended periods of time. Needs are an inferred construct utilizing perceptions of social context heavily. One cannot directly observe another’s Need but only the positive (Usual behavior) or negative (Stress behavior) that result from Needs being met or not being met. Underlying Needs for a given Component describes what it takes in a relationship or task for the person to feel good about self. As with Usual, persons with low scale values need situations and relationships that demand one style of response while those with high scale values need the opposite. Needs are fulfilled when the relationship or situation treats the individual in a manner consistent with their Need; and, when the relationship or situation requires the individual to behave frequently in a manner consistent with their Need. When an individual is in an important situation or relationship that is not consistent with their Need they can feel distressed, mistreated, uncomfortable, and tend to exhibit less effective behavior called Stress behavior. Stress Behavior – describe an individual’s ineffective style of dealing with relationships or tasks. These behaviors are typically described as “how he acts when he is under stress” or “how she behaves when she is frustrated” or similar terms. It is described as ineffective, negative, and non-productive in terms of relationships. Stress behavior can be productive (getting things done) but costly in terms of relationships (leaving “dead bodies” in the wake). Persons with low scale values tend to act out their frustration with one style of ineffective behavior while persons with high scale values act out in the opposite, but equally ineffective, manner. Stress Behavior describes style of behavior not level of effectiveness.
  • Early in the development of The Birkman Method ®, but after the development of the preceding three scales, Dr. Birkman added a third section to the Questionnaire to measure Interests . These ten (10) scales measure occupational preferences. They are an expressed motivational construct. Persons with high scale values tend to prefer to be engaged in activities consistent with the commonly expected responsibilities of the interest scale meaning. The Interest scales were developed to measure general interest, something akin to families of jobs, rather than attempting to develop measures of interest to more specific job titles. The scale values measure intensity of desire to be involved with these activities. They do not measure level of expected skill.
  • The 26 Criterion-Referenced Scales (criterion being a standard measurement by which something may be judged) is made up of management styles, thinking styles, work styles, and Interview Guide Scales. These scales represent data that is often used in hiring / selection and to determine general styles of work, thinking, and management.
  • Through a single online questionnaire The Birkman Method® provides “hire-to-retire” application. Through over 40 individual, comparative, and group reports The Birkman Method® is an effective tool throughout the employment life-cycle.
  • So What? Unlike other assessments that provide only descriptive information, The Birkman Method provides both descriptive and prescriptive feedback. It is the prescriptive data that makes Birkman so unique. The definition of an individual’s underlying needs, available through Birkman’s unique construction and comparative database, provide powerful insight into what specifically drives a person’s behavior, and thus gives people greater choice while allowing these participants to assume a much higher level of responsibility for their own behavior through increased in-depth self-understanding and a relative comparison with others. Without this information, people assume their needs and feelings are “normal”, though seldom quantified, and few people are able to “figure out” how to get their needs met or satisfied. This prescriptive capability is one of Birkman’s most powerful contributions. Birkman provides a common language to define individual differences which is non-judgmental and non-categorical. This language “neutralizes” the assumptions and judgments that most people conclude about others, and opens realistic and lasting opportunities for reliable communication, trust and collaboration. Birkman is more than an individual tool or event. Beyond Birkman’s powerful language and measurement, Birkman provides a sophisticated information management system and over 40 report formats for individuals, groups, teams, and large organizational systems as well. The information can be configured to address a broad spectrum of individual, team and organizational development applications. Further, the extensive information management system of the Birkman data offers important analytical capabilities for organizational and cultural assessment, organizational needs analysis, database sorting, searching and strategically using the data to manage an organization’s human capital.
  • This is the Birkman Life Style Grid® and its general descriptions. This is only 1 report of over 40 reports generated from The Birkman Method® assessment. The horizontal axis ranges from Task-Oriented focus to People-Oriented focus while the vertical axis ranges from Indirect Styles to Direct Styles . The four descriptors are not absolutes for every individual and so should not be considered completely separate and distinct from each other. In reality, most persons represent a combination of these whereby certain descriptions take on a stronger meaning for the individual than others. This is represented on The Life Style Grid® when measurements fall near the divisions between quadrants; or, when near the center of the Grid. If your own measurement appears like this then you will have elements of the other quadrant(s) to your personality.
  • The Life Style Grid® is not a specific measurement. It can be equated to the 25,000 foot view in terms of Birkman measurements. The Life Style Grid® averages the measurements of an individual from each of the four major domains of Birkman. Interests Usual Needs Stress to provide “indications” of your personality. There is other reporting that we won’t cover here today that provides your unique measurements. We will not have time today to cover that information individually.
  • We will start first with Interests. There are 10 scales grouped under the heading of Interests. On the Life Style Grid® your 10 Interest measurements have been averaged together to place you on a single point on the Grid. Where your asterisk (*) is located on the Grid represents where your predominant interests lie. However, you may have some interests of a different color that are significant for you. For that information we would need to look specifically at each of your 10 Interest measurements. For our purposes here today an averaging of the Interests is sufficient to give a general indication of your higher Interests.
  • Wat houdt de Birkman Methode in (Engels)

    1. 1. About The Birkman Method ® - 1951 to today <ul><li>Developed in the late 1940’s by Dr. Roger Birkman </li></ul><ul><li>Created from the need to have an assessment that could measure the behaviors of normal working adults </li></ul><ul><li>Instrument is empirically created, scales were not derived from an existing personality model </li></ul><ul><li>Has been used in over 8000 organizations including most in the Fortune 500 </li></ul><ul><li>Over 3 Million people worldwide have completed The Birkman Method ® assessment </li></ul>The Birkman Offices at 3040 Post Oak in Houston, Texas
    2. 2. About The Birkman Method ® - the assessment Behavior generally is predictable if we know how the person perceived the situation and what is important to him or her. While people’s behavior may not appear rational to an outsider, there is reason to believe it usually is intended to be rational and it is seen as rational by them. An observer often sees behavior as non-rational because the observer does not have access to the same information or does not perceive the environment in the same way. Edward E. Lawler III Distinguished Professor of Business at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business Founder and director of the University's Center for Effective Organizations (CEOs)
    3. 3. About The Birkman Method ® - the assessment 11 scales of BEHAVIORS Not just “how” you behave but “why” you behave the way you do . 1 99 plenty of time alone or in small groups to feel part of the group < a balance> UNDERLYING NEEDS –Expectations & Motivations 1 99 able to work well alone friendly and easy to know < a balance> USUAL Behavior – Social Style 1 99 impatient with group interaction over-valuing group opinion < a balance> STRESS Behavior + -
    4. 4. About The Birkman Method ® - the assessment 10 scales of INTERESTS Expressed preferences and motivations that measure the attraction to, or lack thereof, to tasks and job roles. Birkman Interests are not a measure of abilities.
    5. 5. About The Birkman Method ® - the assessment 26 Criterion-Referenced Scales Management Styles Thinking Styles Work Styles Interview Guide Scales
    6. 6. Applications – the assessment <ul><li>Hiring / Selection   </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Development  </li></ul><ul><li>Executive Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Succession Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Retention </li></ul><ul><li>Team Building   </li></ul><ul><li>Career Management </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict Resolution </li></ul><ul><li>Retirement Planning </li></ul>1 Questionnaire providing “Hire … to … Retire” Application
    7. 7. Applications – the assessment So What? <ul><li>Descriptive + Prescriptive </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Awareness + Self-Management </li></ul><ul><li>Group Awareness + Group Management </li></ul><ul><li>Identify & Accelerate Development </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Judgmental Reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates A Common, Neutral Language </li></ul><ul><li>More than an individual event. </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Direct Communication Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner 1 Report from over 40 reports generated from The Birkman Method ®
    9. 9. Life Style Grid ® The Birkman Life Style Grid® captures an overview of the individual. The Life Style Grid® captures the individual’s average measurements from each of the four major domains within Birkman and then plots them on the Life Style Grid®. These symbols are used for easier recognition on the Life Style Grid®. Interests Needs Usual Stress
    10. 10. Life Style Grid ® The represents Interests . Interests are expressed preferences and motivations that measure the attraction to, or lack thereof, to tasks and job roles. The location of the Interest symbol suggests which activities provide the greatest sense of personal fulfillment. Interests can be expressed through work and hobby. Birkman Interests are not a measure of abilities. Interests
    11. 11. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Task <ul><li>Blue prefers activities allowing for: </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas and consideration of ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Creative approaches </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of doing things </li></ul><ul><li>More abstract thinking </li></ul>Interests
    12. 12. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Task <ul><li>Green prefers activities allowing for: </li></ul><ul><li>Selling or promoting </li></ul><ul><li>Directing others </li></ul><ul><li>Motivating others </li></ul><ul><li>Building agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Using persuasive language </li></ul>Interests
    13. 13. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner People Planner <ul><li>Red prefers activities allowing for: </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing and taking action </li></ul><ul><li>Solving practical problems </li></ul><ul><li>Working through people </li></ul><ul><li>Seeing finished product </li></ul><ul><li>Hands-on work </li></ul>Interests
    14. 14. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner <ul><li>Yellow prefers activities allowing for: </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduled activities and tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed work </li></ul><ul><li>Closer control </li></ul><ul><li>Working with numbers </li></ul><ul><li>Working with systems </li></ul>Interests
    15. 15. <ul><li>The represents Usual behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Usual behavior is described as the individual’s effective style of dealing with relationships and tasks. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Observable by others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Typically accepted as positive by others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexible and adaptable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy and natural for the individual to use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be modified by experience or coaching </li></ul></ul>Usual Life Style Grid ®
    16. 16. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Usual Task <ul><li>Blue behavior appears as: </li></ul><ul><li>Insightful </li></ul><ul><li>Reflective </li></ul><ul><li>Selectively sociable </li></ul><ul><li>Thoughtful </li></ul><ul><li>Optimistic </li></ul>
    17. 17. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Usual Task <ul><li>Green behavior appears as: </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive </li></ul><ul><li>Assertive </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Persuasive </li></ul>
    18. 18. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Usual People Planner <ul><li>Red behavior appears as: </li></ul><ul><li>Friendly </li></ul><ul><li>Decisive </li></ul><ul><li>Energetic </li></ul><ul><li>Direct </li></ul><ul><li>Logical </li></ul>
    19. 19. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Usual People <ul><li>Yellow behavior appears as: </li></ul><ul><li>Orderly </li></ul><ul><li>Concentrative </li></ul><ul><li>Cautious </li></ul><ul><li>Insistent </li></ul><ul><li>Low key </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>The represents Needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Needs describe the expectations an individual has of how relationships and tasks will be governed in a particular situation regardless of perceived social correctness. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rarely observable by others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How the individual needs to be treated, supported, and motivated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Our “lens” through which we see and perceive others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remain essentially static and persistent over time. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the preferred environment </li></ul></ul>Needs Life Style Grid ®
    21. 21. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Needs Task <ul><li>Blue needs: </li></ul><ul><li>Individualized reassurance </li></ul><ul><li>Suggestive direction </li></ul><ul><li>Varied activities </li></ul><ul><li>Personalized scheduling </li></ul><ul><li>Time to reflect </li></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><li>To Satisfy the Blue Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend time with individuals who offer personal reassurance and support. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek out involvement in new and varied activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek out relationships with people who are suggestive rather than directive in direction . </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives Needs
    23. 23. Direct Communication <ul><li>Life Style Grid ® </li></ul>Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Needs Task <ul><li>Green needs: </li></ul><ul><li>Individual approval </li></ul><ul><li>Defined authority </li></ul><ul><li>Active environments </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible scheduling </li></ul><ul><li>Working with others </li></ul>
    24. 24. <ul><li>To Satisfy the Green Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend time in environments which are action-oriented and have defined authority </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build broad and flexible scheduling into your life </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arrange time for group socializing </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives Needs
    25. 25. Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner People Planner <ul><li>Red needs: </li></ul><ul><li>Clear cut situations </li></ul><ul><li>Plenty to do - action </li></ul><ul><li>Group interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Concrete results </li></ul><ul><li>Directive authority </li></ul>Needs
    26. 26. <ul><li>To Satisfy the Red Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek relationships which allow for casual and direct communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find opportunities for strong and direct authority </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek out energetic, action-oriented environments </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives Needs
    27. 27. Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner People <ul><li>Yellow needs: </li></ul><ul><li>Orderly and organized approach </li></ul><ul><li>Concentration on tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency and predictability </li></ul><ul><li>An environment of trust </li></ul><ul><li>Casual interaction </li></ul>Needs
    28. 28. <ul><li>To Satisfy the Yellow Need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek out environments that provide structure and specific direction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Take time to be with individuals that allow friendly, low-key interaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build predictability through scheduling and processes </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives Needs
    29. 29. <ul><li>The represents potential behavior that can result when individual needs go unmet over time. </li></ul><ul><li>Stress describe an individual’s ineffective style of dealing with relationships or tasks. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defensive and negative in nature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seen as negative and unacceptable by others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inflexible and non-adaptable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uncomfortable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Difficult to modify but controllable </li></ul></ul>Stress Life Style Grid ®
    30. 30. Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Stress Task <ul><li>Blue stress may appear as: </li></ul><ul><li>Ignoring social convention </li></ul><ul><li>Indecisive </li></ul><ul><li>Difficulty in taking action </li></ul><ul><li>Overly sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Magnifying problems </li></ul>
    31. 31. <ul><li>To Manage Blue Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate in a more direct and logical fashion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Move pending decisions toward closure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work to make your voice heard in groups </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives
    32. 32. Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner Task <ul><li>Green stress may appear as: </li></ul><ul><li>Easily distracted </li></ul><ul><li>Distrustful of others </li></ul><ul><li>Domineering </li></ul><ul><li>Failing to follow plans </li></ul><ul><li>Protective of personal interests </li></ul>Stress
    33. 33. <ul><li>To Manage Green Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend time with the details </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use more caution and predictability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work to listen and hear the other person </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives
    34. 34. Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner People Planner <ul><li>Red stress may appear as: </li></ul><ul><li>Impatient </li></ul><ul><li>Busy for the sake of being busy </li></ul><ul><li>Minimizing problems </li></ul><ul><li>Overly concrete and unreflective </li></ul><ul><li>Insensitive </li></ul>Stress
    35. 35. <ul><li>To Manage Red Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Take time for thoughtful reflection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look for the subtleties of the situation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage in a more optimistic outlook </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives
    36. 36. Direct Communication Life Style Grid ® Indirect Communication People Oriented Task Oriented Expediter Communicator Administrator Planner People <ul><li>Yellow stress may appear as: </li></ul><ul><li>Overly insistent on the rules </li></ul><ul><li>Resistant to change </li></ul><ul><li>Reluctant to confront others </li></ul><ul><li>Uncomfortable when bargaining </li></ul><ul><li>Inflexible in thinking / attitude </li></ul>Stress
    37. 37. <ul><li>To Manage Yellow Stress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show open enthusiasm about new ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate directly about ideas and issues – try to sell your point of view </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strive to understand the importance of being flexible when change is occurring </li></ul></ul>Birkman Prescriptives
    38. 38. Voor aanvullende informatie en vragen: Bel: 06-20019957 of mail naar: [email_address]

    ×