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Health and Safety Executive - Changing Buttons on an Old Jacket - FuturePMO 2018

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Presented by Matt Warren, Head of Corporate P3MO, Health and Safety Executive

Establishing or re-energising a PMO can add real value in supporting an organisation deliver its change or operational agenda. However, to embed such a function, so that it delivers that value is no mean feat. Even once ‘embedded’, the life of many PMOs are short-lived and seldom provide the ‘value’ envisioned from the outset. Why is this?

As PMO professionals it is vital we challenge our own notions or assumptions of what success looks like in a particular organisation when implementing PMOs– remember, there is no unique definition of what a PMO is or does! In my session, I discuss how organisational context and ‘cultural DNA’ can mediate the effectiveness of a PMO deployment and how a PMO needs to align itself to the core values espoused by the organisation. In addition, I shall discuss the importance of understanding the organisation’s stance, assumptions and/or pre-existing notions of what a PMO is before implementing.

Presented by Matt Warren, Head of Corporate P3MO, Health and Safety Executive

Establishing or re-energising a PMO can add real value in supporting an organisation deliver its change or operational agenda. However, to embed such a function, so that it delivers that value is no mean feat. Even once ‘embedded’, the life of many PMOs are short-lived and seldom provide the ‘value’ envisioned from the outset. Why is this?

As PMO professionals it is vital we challenge our own notions or assumptions of what success looks like in a particular organisation when implementing PMOs– remember, there is no unique definition of what a PMO is or does! In my session, I discuss how organisational context and ‘cultural DNA’ can mediate the effectiveness of a PMO deployment and how a PMO needs to align itself to the core values espoused by the organisation. In addition, I shall discuss the importance of understanding the organisation’s stance, assumptions and/or pre-existing notions of what a PMO is before implementing.

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Health and Safety Executive - Changing Buttons on an Old Jacket - FuturePMO 2018

  1. 1. Health and Safety Executive Health and Safety Executive Changing Buttons on an Old Jacket Matt Warren Head of P3MO, Health and Safety Executive
  2. 2. Overview • Introduction • Importance of culture • The importance of language • Setting your stall out early • Seeking support • How to get traction quickly • The Journey
  3. 3. Insight • 50% of project management offices close within 3 years (Association for Project Mgmt) • Since 2008, the correlated PMO implementation failure rate is over 50% (Gartner Project Manager 2014) • 68% of stakeholders perceive their PMOs to be bureaucratic (2013 Gartner PPM Summit) “One of the overriding issues fuelling these poor stats is the fact that in many organisations, there is a wide gap between what the PMO is doing and what the business expects”
  4. 4. What do you think of?
  5. 5. So where do the buttons and jackets come in? ‘Organisation Culture and values can be described as the threads that keep an organisation together’ Your Organisation Your ‘new’ PMO “Best practice PMO”
  6. 6. So how do you understand culture? *Language* PMO Alignment Crucial *Language*
  7. 7. Perception – 2 way transaction Organisation Shared experience, assumptions and values PMO ‘Best practice’ Success!
  8. 8. Understanding culture • Challenge your own assumptions • Many people will have had experiences of PMOs before, and will view your implementation through a lens of experience (or even social construct) • Speak to people – get their thoughts and ideas • Build your allies “People support what they help create”
  9. 9. Importance of language • Remember, not everyone works, or has worked in a PPM environment ( ) • Workplace language is part of the culture itself. Where possible use it • Use positive language
  10. 10. Set your stall out early • Don’t let there be an information vacuum • There are many definitions of what a PMO is and a variety different views on what a PMO does • Colleagues will have preconceived ideas – its important to reconcile that view early, Otherwise, you will end up adding value in ‘wrong areas’ - PMOs are all about value
  11. 11. Set your stall out early • Be explicit about what functions and services the PMO will be providing
  12. 12. Seeking support • Not everyone will be supportive from the outset • It will be a lonely place without the right support • Understanding your key stakeholders is critical (not just seniors) • Be prepared to challenge your own assumptions
  13. 13. How to get traction quickly • People believe what they see, not necessarily what they hear! • When ‘stuff’ is visible, this starts to make the PMO more tangible • Small wins/low hanging fruit - but have a plan • Keep is simple - mature slowly
  14. 14. The Journey Sense and Adapt Define Business Need Plan Quick Wins Govern Build Capability Evaluate Value The ‘challenge’
  15. 15. The Journey Key Activity Description Sense and adapt Understand the business (maturity, assumptions, culture) Define Business Needs Based upon business strategy and maturity define the business needs and prioritise services Plan This is a change programme - have a plan which the business is signed up to! Quick wins Based on value and capabilities determine what are ‘things’ you could put in place quickly Build Capability Don’t focus on developing PMO services without focusing on capability - as tempting as that is* Evaluate Value Value is key to everything. Remember value I subjective and can change
  16. 16. Any Questions?

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