Thriving in turbulent times

maximizing your success in the new social environment
                              May 4, 20...
agenda

 The emerging new economy
 The third sector and survival
 Funding and new opportunities
 From competition to c...
independent, non partisan, think tank advancing health equity

                  rigorous research leads to pragmatic poli...
affordable
                              housing




        social                            healthcare
      innovation...
“the future isn’t what it used to be”
                                environment

                               communic...
the new normal

 shift to the intellectual capital economy
 massive credit and debt loads
 $5 trillion dollar stimulus
...
the best is yet to come….we will recover




   www.wellesleyinstitute.com
speed debating

                                 What macro issues do you
                                    see affectin...
the third sector (and why it matters)
                             Delivers vital services and
                           ...
$90 billion GDP
                             Six times
                             the size of
                          ...
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Trends in Revenue Sources
                                     Core Nonprofit Sector
                       (without busin...
Case study: developing affordable homes
          Financing a 50-unit seniors’ housing project (2007)
                 $12...
collaboration




www.wellesleyinstitute.com
collaboration principles

                               Collective activities form
                               signifi...
speed debating


                                 In what types of
Discussion 2                     collaborations are you...
cause for concern

                             a heightened sense of anxiety about
                             funding a...
our collaborative initiative

                               A multi-year research and
                              polic...
funding and collaboration

                              reliability remains tenuous.
                              cumu...
collaboration challenges




 administrative burden is heavy, unrelenting, and places many
  constraints on their ability...
collaboration principles
                              “more for the same”, not “the same
                               ...
recommendations

 A new “virtual” Centre for Leadership in Collaboration, working in
  partnership with a funders’ collab...
recommendations
 If collaboration is one of many activities that NFPs are expected to
  perform without dedicated resourc...
recommendations

 Collaborative efforts should be established as time-dated
  initiatives with a shared vision, clear goa...
not all doom and gloom

                              umbrella groups and networking
                                 gro...
the chase for revenue

                              Stock market declines have
                               had a seve...
challenges

                               political vulnerability of grants
                                and programs...
More challenges

 Grant management, of necessity, takes priority
  over other management responsibilities.
 Funders need...
The Roof co-location (Barrie)




www.wellesleyinstitute.com
social innovation
                 Culture of
                   Social
                 Innovation




Social Finance    ...
A common lexicon is important
 Social innovation does not entail commercial
   interest and is oriented towards systemic ...
social enterprise continuum

                                                                         Volunteerism



    ...
social finance in the third sector
                              Role of third sector is to respond to
                  ...
speed debating


                                 How do you define innovation
Discussion 3
                              ...
the rise of social innovation




 Social innovation is an initiative, product, process or program that profoundly
  chan...
insights

 Successful social innovations
    have durability and broad
    impact
   Innovations avoid “band-aid”
    so...
the innovation cycle (F. Wesley)

                     capacity                  exploration




          resiliency     ...
building social innovation capacity
                                Process needs to connect:


                         ...
Social Finance: New (and sometimes not-to-
new) ways to deliver the finances that third
sector groups need to get their wo...
speed debating

                                 What new ways of
Discussion 4                     funding/financing have ...
The UK experiment…FutureFund
 Invested unclaimed bank assets into a 250M GBP
   fund with annual revenue of 20M GBP

 Ba...
social finance
      Social finance is the flow of financial capital to
      human need uses:
                           ...
spectrum of social finance
     A healthy social finance marketplace contains many different MODELS



       Investment T...
UK social finance spectrum
                             Venturesome’s Spectrum of Venture Capital Investment
             ...
Creating Social Finance Solutions
 Paul Cheng - Venturesome
    Venturesome is not a bank, nor a granting organisation - i...
social finance support systems
                                Courtesy SIG @MaRS




 The UK marketplace also contains ma...
legal structure basics
                                                What is an appropriate legal structure?

 What is C...
financial stakeholders in Canada
                                                           Charitable
                   ...
enabling public policy
                  The UK civil society contains many successful
                      ADVOCATES and...
Policy Catalyst Working Group
                             Reflecting public benefit through government

                 ...
structure and reform
                                   (courtesy SIG @MaRS)



                          Two big issues t...
building a resilient and sustainable future




   Third sector organizations will need to engage in new models for futur...
Breaking news…legislative victory!
     The Wellesley Institute convinced
      the Ontario government just last
         ...
People are talking to each other
                 online
2 choices:

1. Resist it, and it will happen anyway, elsewhere,
 ...
some benefits of social media
                1. Listen and learn
           2. Publish valuable news and
                ...
The web is about
               conversations,
           not top down delivery
              of information or
          ...
Social media works best in tandem
        with traditional means
 Baby….bathwater….no!
 Segments our audiences
 Build o...
the purpose of social media is to
engage with audiences in interactive
communities
 Genuine engagement facilitates a high...
Social media can change the world
 We’re looking for impact, influence, and change
 A message that resonates can make an...
innovative ways of getting things done
    The social web allows people and organizations
       to connect in unlimited ...
Organizations using sm successfully

 Here comes everybody
 Focus on relationships, not on “campaigns”
 Commit resource...
Social web innovates….
 Public relations
 Media relations
 Communications
 Networking
 Collaboration
 Outreach
 Fun...
How?
 Constant, small iterations
 Lather, rinse, repeat
 Tell stories




www.wellesleyinstitute.com
 Great grassroots initiatives
 Facebook groups
 Flashmob opportunities
 Online communities
 Email
 E-commerce on sit...
doing more with less




     © The Wellesley Institute
70   www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Building your brand




     © The Wellesley Institute
71   www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Ensuring the right culture




     © The Wellesley Institute
72   www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Culture precedes innovation success
 Social entrepreneurship governance model


 Permission to fail


 Integrated think...
We gratefully acknowledge the
 support and contribution of our
 various partners in the creation of
 this presentation.

 ...
Thank you and summary



 www.wellesleyinstitute.com



     © The Wellesley Institute
75   www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Thriving in Turbulent Times: Maximizing Your Success in the New Social Environment
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Thriving in Turbulent Times: Maximizing Your Success in the New Social Environment

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This presentation looks at social innovation and social entrepreneurship models as opportunities for organizations to survive and thrive.

Rick Blickstead, CEO of the Wellesley Institute
Michael Shapcott, Director of Housing and Innovation
Aerin Guy
www.wellesleyinstitute.com
Follow us on twitter @wellesleyWI

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  • Hi - some interesting points made, especially from a UK perspective. Thank you for sharing. I've added the show to my group at: www.slideshare.net/group/voluntary-sector-training-tools
    Jim
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  • Thriving in Turbulent Times: Maximizing Your Success in the New Social Environment

    1. 1. Thriving in turbulent times maximizing your success in the new social environment May 4, 2009 www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    2. 2. agenda  The emerging new economy  The third sector and survival  Funding and new opportunities  From competition to co-petition  Challenges and opportunities  Rise of social innovation  Need for social enterprise and social finance  Building a resilient and sustainable future  Culture underpins success www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    3. 3. independent, non partisan, think tank advancing health equity rigorous research leads to pragmatic policy consumer-centric, solutions focused relentless incrementalism tipping point decisions www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    4. 4. affordable housing social healthcare innovation reform immigrant health www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    5. 5. “the future isn’t what it used to be” environment communications information freedom 85? interconnectedness sandwich generation Boomer and zoomer less is less www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    6. 6. the new normal  shift to the intellectual capital economy  massive credit and debt loads  $5 trillion dollar stimulus  trillion dollar hangover and possible stagflation  possible loss of 20,000 NFP  coping with those left behind www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    7. 7. the best is yet to come….we will recover www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    8. 8. speed debating What macro issues do you see affecting your Discussion 1 organization? What micro issues affect your organizations? What is affecting your colleagues? What is affecting you? www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    9. 9. the third sector (and why it matters) Delivers vital services and programs to people Strengthens communities…builds social cohesion Makes a large and dynamic contribution to economy Significant employer 12 million volunteers www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    10. 10. $90 billion GDP Six times the size of the auto industry www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    11. 11. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    12. 12. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    13. 13. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    14. 14. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    15. 15. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    16. 16. Trends in Revenue Sources Core Nonprofit Sector (without business and professional associations) 70% 60% 50% 40% earned income charitable donations 30% government 20% 10% 0% 1997 1999 2001 2004 www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    17. 17. Case study: developing affordable homes Financing a 50-unit seniors’ housing project (2007) $122,000 per unit construction cost Canada-Ontario Contribution $2,100,000 Municipal grant 194,750 Donation 520,000 Fundraising 675,000 Subtotal $3,489,750 Mortgage 2,610,250 TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET $6,100,000 Issues: Multiple funding sources, multiple accountability / regulatory requirements, inconsistent funding rules, timing concerns, heavy reliance on fundraising / earned income (20%), heavy reliance on private financing (43%) with ongoing financial burden… www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    18. 18. collaboration www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    19. 19. collaboration principles Collective activities form significant part of NFP work Much is accidental or incidental; but still important Much is also simply information sharing with some resources Need to take to next level www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    20. 20. speed debating In what types of Discussion 2 collaborations are you normally involved? What makes them good or poor? What would you change to improve? www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    21. 21. cause for concern a heightened sense of anxiety about funding and organizational stability, even survival, over the next two or three years at least one-third of the organizations experiencing serious economic impacts, and all fear that things will get worse before they improve NFP organizations are hearing that many long-term funders, including many United Ways, Community Foundations and family foundations will be reducing their granting programs in 2009 and 2010. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    22. 22. our collaborative initiative A multi-year research and policy initiative to examine good (and not-so-good) collaborations in the third sector – and the private sector …and to provide solid research and policy direction to our ongoing work in supporting effective collaboration www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    23. 23. funding and collaboration  reliability remains tenuous.  cumulative administrative burden is all consuming.  multi-year grants do not solve the administrative burden.  funders are slow to approve/reject grants  slow response time causes “gap” problems for service delivery. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    24. 24. collaboration challenges  administrative burden is heavy, unrelenting, and places many constraints on their ability to operate effectively  actual impact of the funding process is directly at odds with reasons we engage non-profit organizations to deliver community services.  funders, large and small, rarely give community organizations any latitude to adapt or adjust programs and finances to meet local conditions and changing circumstances.  grant applications tend to be overly long, complicated, and difficult to complete. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    25. 25. collaboration principles  “more for the same”, not “the same for less”  collaboration can make existing organizations more efficient and effective, and can deliver better programs and services that benefit clients, through shared resources.  funders should not view collaboration (or, indeed, measures such as forced integration or amalgamation) as a means to reduce infrastructure  a means to improve effectiveness and efficiency starting, at a minimum, with existing resources. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    26. 26. recommendations  A new “virtual” Centre for Leadership in Collaboration, working in partnership with a funders’ collaborative alliance, should be created to serve as a hub and a catalyst for action among individual organizations, and with funders.  a more intentional structure within the third sector to identify and share good practices and to bring together NFPs and funders to share and assess collaborative ventures.  funding agencies should shift a meaningful portion of program dollars to create the infrastructure that supports collaborative partnerships. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    27. 27. recommendations  If collaboration is one of many activities that NFPs are expected to perform without dedicated resources, then the real gains from collaboration will be hard to achieve.  Existing collaboratives, networks and integration structures (as an example: Local Health Integration Networks, the Community-Based Research Network, Community Partnerships, and others) should provide leadership in developing and sustaining effective collaborations.  The capacity for creativity for collaboration among these existing organizations needs to be encouraged and supported. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    28. 28. recommendations  Collaborative efforts should be established as time-dated initiatives with a shared vision, clear goals and objectives, and highly-defined impact mandates by all partners  Longer-term collaboratives should be encouraged to continually self-assess and re-invent themselves to remain relevant  Collaborations should adapt to changing circumstances and, in some instances, should be prepared to wind down in response to evolving conditions.” www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    29. 29. not all doom and gloom  umbrella groups and networking groups are bringing their members together, to share best practices.  agencies are looking for new ways to collaborate with one another.  charities are looking at diversifying their fundraising base, and also at opportunities to generate new revenues.  concerned funders – such as foundations and United Ways – are actively engaged in explorations of how to have greater impact with fewer dollars.  reduce costs – to do more with less. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    30. 30. the chase for revenue  Stock market declines have had a severe impact on the value of endowment funds that many NFPs have been carefully building for years.  Corporate donors and sponsors are frequently not renewing their support.  A number of social service agencies – such as food banks and credit counseling agencies – report significantly increased demand for their services. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    31. 31. challenges  political vulnerability of grants and programs is increasing.  large and small grants impose heavy administrative burdens.  all three organizations described themselves as “operating on the edge,” with staff more than fully engaged and extremely vulnerable should a senior manager leave.  senior managers are very aware and worried that they cannot replace themselves. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    32. 32. More challenges  Grant management, of necessity, takes priority over other management responsibilities.  Funders need to do things differently.  None of the agencies we studied had a portfolio of funders that supported them to get on with the task of delivering effective services and building communities.  Core non-profits rely more heavily on non- governmental funding… www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    33. 33. The Roof co-location (Barrie) www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    34. 34. social innovation Culture of Social Innovation Social Finance Public Policy Social Social Enterprise Entrepreneurship
    35. 35. A common lexicon is important  Social innovation does not entail commercial interest and is oriented towards systemic change  Social enterprise is a profit oriented entity marketing its products and services blending business interests with social ends getting both an economic and social return on investment. Often also called a social purpose business.  Social entrepreneurship is an individual-centred concept www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    36. 36. social enterprise continuum Volunteerism Public Services Social enterprise Socially responsible business Profit driven mainstream business www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    37. 37. social finance in the third sector  Role of third sector is to respond to need and pioneer new approaches beyond the reach of public and private sector.  Ability to do so is undermined by financial frailty  In UK Commission on unclaimed asset develop the concept of a Social Investment bank  Objective is to provide urgently needed greater investment and professional support. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    38. 38. speed debating How do you define innovation Discussion 3 What forms of social innovation do you use? What are the obstacles to innovation? How do you reward risk taking? www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    39. 39. the rise of social innovation  Social innovation is an initiative, product, process or program that profoundly changes the basic routines, resource and authority flows or beliefs of any social system (F. Wesley Sig Waterloo).  Social system is defined as any organized assembly of resources, beliefs and procedures regulated by interaction or interdependence to accomplish specific outcomes  Social systems are complex and must be adaptive and constantly evolving  Social systems have own culture, political and economic structures and social interactions www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    40. 40. insights  Successful social innovations have durability and broad impact  Innovations avoid “band-aid” solutions  When broad and durable, SI is disruptive and create systemic change  Must cross multiple boundaries, reach different and more people, more organizations, and linked into social networks  Social innovations depend on “surprising coalitions” www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    41. 41. the innovation cycle (F. Wesley) capacity exploration resiliency choice exploitation www.wellesleyinstitute.com S 
    42. 42. building social innovation capacity  Process needs to connect:  1) Links between vulnerability and resilience  2) Re-engaging vulnerable populations that are disenfranchised from resources  3) Creates links between a healthy environment, vibrant economy and social justice www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    43. 43. Social Finance: New (and sometimes not-to- new) ways to deliver the finances that third sector groups need to get their work done… enpTO: A pilot project led by the Centre for Social Innovation, with the Wellesley Institute as a founding partner, to assist non-profits to develop their financial base www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    44. 44. speed debating What new ways of Discussion 4 funding/financing have you explored? What are the barriers internally and externally Where might you find capital sources? www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    45. 45. The UK experiment…FutureFund  Invested unclaimed bank assets into a 250M GBP fund with annual revenue of 20M GBP  Bank acts as a “wholesaler” of capital for the social sector  It capitalizes present financial intermediaries, provide advice and support, develops sustained investment programs, supports new intermediaries in efforts to raise capital  Facilitates access to private finance as well as broader capital markets. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    46. 46. social finance Social finance is the flow of financial capital to human need uses: Charity and • Affordable Housing Non-profit • Social Enterprise • Support for working families • Health & Home Care • Community Development Hybrid • Social Economy Space • Clean Technology Business Government • Microfinance • Fair Trade • Green Building • Education • Bottom of the Pyramid source: market sector listing adapted from www.xigi.net)
    47. 47. spectrum of social finance A healthy social finance marketplace contains many different MODELS Investment Type UK Examples Canadian Examples Financial Institutions Triodos, Charity Bank Vancity Financial Investment Product Social Investment Jantzi Index Universe Forum, GSI Social Venture Capital - business Catalyst Investeco, Renewal 2 Social Venture Capital – social Bridges Ventures, Resilient Capital enterprise Venturesome Government Loans Future Builders Fiducie Chantier de L’economie Sociale Trust Non-Government Grants Unltd. Enterprising Non Profits (ENP) – BC and ON Philanthropy Esmee Fairbairn McConnell Foundation Vancouver Foundation Ontario Trillium Foundation, 47 Wellesley Institute
    48. 48. UK social finance spectrum Venturesome’s Spectrum of Venture Capital Investment Increasing evidence of HIGH commercial finance available CHANCE OF Secured loan REPAYMENT Dark grey area show where supply Standby of finance is readily available Light Facility grey area is where there is a need Overdraft for more capital and instruments Unsecured Loan LOW RISK HIGH RISK Working Pre-funding Hard Soft Capital Capital Working Patient Development Development (closed) Capital (open) Capital Fundraising Capital Capital Quasi-equity Equity LOW Need for further supply of CHANCE OF REPAYMENT Grant capital and development of financial instruments What does Canada’s spectrum look like? 48 Courtesy of Paul Cheng at Venturesome
    49. 49. Creating Social Finance Solutions Paul Cheng - Venturesome Venturesome is not a bank, nor a granting organisation - it provides underwriting/stand-by facilities, unsecured loans and equity and quasi-equity 3 models of social enterprise 1. Profit Generator – goal to get profit and give some (or all) away to charity (Patagonia) 2. Trade Off Financial and Social Returns - activity has social impact, but needs to trade off between financial and social impact (ie, The Hoxton) 3. Lock-Step – no trade- off between social and financial impact - if one side goes down, the whole organisation does (ie. community wind farms) • Responding to issues in the third sector – charities are undercapitalized with weak balance sheets and a ‘donor’ culture rather than an ‘investor’ culture • Provided £12m to 200 organisations, with a default rate of less than 5% • Current fund is £10m with banks, foundations and HNW individual investors • Exploring the ‘negative return’ spectrum - 100% - 15% 0% + 8% Grant-makers Capital-protected Market-rate return 49 Courtesy of Paul Cheng at Venturesome
    50. 50. social finance support systems Courtesy SIG @MaRS The UK marketplace also contains many social finance INTERMEDIARIES Investment Corporate Bank Finance Social Finance Ltd Catalyst Research Legal Guidestar Structures Ashoka Social CIC’s Enterprise Growth What systems exist in Canada? 50
    51. 51. legal structure basics What is an appropriate legal structure? What is CIC? Community interest companies (CIC) are a type of limited company designed specifically for those wishing to operate for the benefit of the community rather than for benefit of owners of the company.. CICs can be limited by shares, or by guarantee, and will have a statutory “Asset Lock” to prevent the assets and profits being distributed, except as permitted by legislation. This ensures the assets and profits are retained within the CIC for community purposes, or transferred to another asset-locked organisation, such as another CIC or charity. What is an L3C? L3C'sare low-profit limited liability corporations, which function via a business modality that is a hybrid legal structure combining the financial advantages of the limited liability company, an LLC, with the social advantages of a non-profit entity. An L3C is run like a regular business and is profitable. However, unlike a for-profit business, the primary focus of the L3C is not to make money, but to achieve socially beneficial aims, with profit making as a secondary goal. What is the Community Enterprise Act? Sector leaders in Canada are exploring the creation of a legal structure, learning from CIC and L3C models. 51 Each model has its pros and cons...what is right for Canada?
    52. 52. financial stakeholders in Canada Charitable Foundations Endowments Mainstream Private Companies Banks Federal and Financial Financial Pension Funds Provincial Stakeholders Stakeholders Government Insurance High Net Worth Companies Individuals SIO & SRI Mutual Credit Unions Funds How do we engage and connect the individuals in these stakeholder groups? 52 What is he role of crowd sourcing and micro-investors?
    53. 53. enabling public policy The UK civil society contains many successful ADVOCATES and ASSOCIATIONS • Social Enterprise Coalition provides research and awareness programs and is proactively developing relationships with both political parties • The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) provides the support and voice for the voluntary and community sector The UK has an OFFICE OF THE THIRD SECTOR • Created in 2006 • Sits within Cabinet with its own minister, Kevin Brenn an • Pros and Cons to placement in central government The Third Sector includes voluntary and community groups, social enterprises, charities, cooperatives and mutuals Which government body, advocates and associations do we need in 53 Canada?
    54. 54. Policy Catalyst Working Group Reflecting public benefit through government Key issues to address What is an appropriate policy catalyst? •Creation of a social innovation ministry (Office of the Third Sector)? •Creation of a social innovation endowment (NESTA)? What should a ‘government body’ cover? • How should public benefit services be reflected in government •Focus Innovation and not cost-cutting What should a ‘NESTA-like’ organisation do? •Canada-wide knowledge management and research • Funding for social innovation projects •Challenge Grant Programs Should the catalyst be provincial, federal or both? 54 Is there a role for municipal leadership?
    55. 55. structure and reform (courtesy SIG @MaRS) Two big issues to address: Legal structure • Designing and advocating for a legal structure for Canada • Pros and cons of CIC and LC3 • Provincial and Federal actions need to be activated Regulatory reform (foundations and taxes) •Revising and advocating for improvement of regulations for foundations • CRA and PRI guidelines for foundations • Exploring how tax levers might support investment in social innovation and social enterprises Key Step: Convene a high profile working group 55
    56. 56. building a resilient and sustainable future  Third sector organizations will need to engage in new models for future expansion  Private-Public and Third sector partnerships will be critical  Collaboration will necessitate real exchange and sharing of financial and people resources  Organizations will need to agree to common missions, values and objectives www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    57. 57. Breaking news…legislative victory! The Wellesley Institute convinced the Ontario government just last week to amend its draft anti- poverty law to recognize critical importance of third sector www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    58. 58. People are talking to each other online 2 choices: 1. Resist it, and it will happen anyway, elsewhere, outside your influence 2. Support it, participate, influence it, and leverage it for extending your brand
    59. 59. some benefits of social media 1. Listen and learn 2. Publish valuable news and information 3. Distribute promotions 4. Create or extend your brand personality 5. Engage in conversations and customer services 6. Efforts lead back to websites – repository of information
    60. 60. The web is about conversations, not top down delivery of information or messages. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    61. 61. Social media works best in tandem with traditional means  Baby….bathwater….no!  Segments our audiences  Build on the power of networks and burgeoning communities  Organizations using communities to connect faster, more collaboratively, more inclusively, and more effectively  Proliferation of social media stories within traditional media piques interest
    62. 62. the purpose of social media is to engage with audiences in interactive communities  Genuine engagement facilitates a highly involved audience that wants to interact with “the brand”  The more people an organization can interact with who already have strong social networks, the more likely it is that a message can be spread through those networks
    63. 63. Social media can change the world  We’re looking for impact, influence, and change  A message that resonates can make an enormous difference  Frozen Pea Fund – original Twitter posts became a global campaign for breast cancer awareness  Barack Obama’s presidential campaign  Kiva.org  Netchange  Stableandaffordable.com  Homeless Hub  Can you think of any others?
    64. 64. innovative ways of getting things done  The social web allows people and organizations to connect in unlimited ways  connectivity as a catalyst for change  Technology as an enabler for innovation  For example: Kiva.com  Microloans for the developing world  Connects third world entrepreneurs with microlenders world wide www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    65. 65. Organizations using sm successfully  Here comes everybody  Focus on relationships, not on “campaigns”  Commit resources to learning and training  Made and learned from mistakes  Respect and humbled by medium www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    66. 66. Social web innovates….  Public relations  Media relations  Communications  Networking  Collaboration  Outreach  Fundraising  Word of mouth www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    67. 67. How?  Constant, small iterations  Lather, rinse, repeat  Tell stories www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    68. 68.  Great grassroots initiatives  Facebook groups  Flashmob opportunities  Online communities  Email  E-commerce on site www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    69. 69. doing more with less © The Wellesley Institute 70 www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    70. 70. Building your brand © The Wellesley Institute 71 www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    71. 71. Ensuring the right culture © The Wellesley Institute 72 www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    72. 72. Culture precedes innovation success  Social entrepreneurship governance model  Permission to fail  Integrated thinking  Creative thinking and pragmatic doing  Small acorns produce large oak trees www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    73. 73. We gratefully acknowledge the support and contribution of our various partners in the creation of this presentation. Thank you. www.wellesleyinstitute.com
    74. 74. Thank you and summary www.wellesleyinstitute.com © The Wellesley Institute 75 www.wellesleyinstitute.com

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