Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
GLOBAL OUTSOURCING:
RECENT ISSUES & CHALLENGES IN
THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY
WEI GAROFOLO & FABIO GAROFOLO
Drug development has become a tremendous
challenge for most pharmaceutical companies
today. Investment of US$1 billion and...
The pharmaceutical industry, like others,
goes through various stages of the business life
cycle and, apparently, it is no...
We have seen major increases in R&D
investment; however the return has been disappointing,
with decreases in successful ne...
To cope with the challenges in the future,
pharmaceutical companies have become more
selective by focusing only on innovat...
‘Aging’ seems to be
another opportunity for big pharma because the
overall aging of the population will provide a big
mark...
However, challenges
remain with the opportunity, because these agerelated
new drugs, such as CNS drugs, have only
a 1% cha...
 In other words, R&D
must be performed with greater efficiency, major
cost containment and faster speed, drug discovery
mu...
Tougher regulations are another challenge the
pharmaceutical industry is facing. For instance,
the FDA Amendment Act (FDAA...
In addition, the recently issued FDA guidelines
on metabolites in safety testing (MIST) clearly
state that a more extensiv...
This is due to the recent belief
that characterization of UMMs could provide
greater insight into the connection between
m...
“…even if the market for generic drugs is huge,
the competition among generic companies
themselves has become tougher, whi...
Generic drug companies appear to do better
than big pharmaceutical companies. It is
forecasted that they will continue to ...
In addition, there is also the increasing government
promotion of generic drugs to counter growing
healthcare drug expendi...
For the full Bioanalysis publication,
please visit Wei Garofolo's
professional website
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Global Outsourcing: Recent Issues & Challenges in the Pharmaceutical Industry

464 views

Published on

The first portion of Wei Garofolo's Bioanalysis "Global Outsourcing" publication.

Published in: Science
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Global Outsourcing: Recent Issues & Challenges in the Pharmaceutical Industry

  1. 1. GLOBAL OUTSOURCING: RECENT ISSUES & CHALLENGES IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY WEI GAROFOLO & FABIO GAROFOLO
  2. 2. Drug development has become a tremendous challenge for most pharmaceutical companies today. Investment of US$1 billion and 10 years are very common in order to launch any new drug, not to mention that it is also common for a promising candidate to fail to become a manufacturable and marketable therapy after many years of development [1]. 
  3. 3. The pharmaceutical industry, like others, goes through various stages of the business life cycle and, apparently, it is now in a downcycle compared with 10–20 years ago. Blockbuster drugs and the enormous earnings from them are perishing, ‘me-too’ drugs are only making limited profits and old drug targets are becoming exhausted [2].
  4. 4. We have seen major increases in R&D investment; however the return has been disappointing, with decreases in successful new drugs. Based on the numbers published, in the USA the R&D spending has increased year by year from US$15,000 million in 1995 to over US$40,000 million in 2006, but the number of new molecular entities (NMEs) and new biologic license applications (BLAs) approved by the US FDA has gone down from over 50 in 1996 to approximately 20 in 2006 [1]. Obviously, despite substantial R&D spending, pharmaceutical companies’ development pipelines seem to be failing to provide promising rewards. 
  5. 5. To cope with the challenges in the future, pharmaceutical companies have become more selective by focusing only on innovations that could produce significant returns in the future, such as disease models, biologics (e.g., somatic cells, gene therapy and recombinant therapeutic proteins) and biomarkers. However, on a more positive note, genome studies are producing new drug targets and it is estimated that in 10–15 years, most new drugs will be produced from these new targets [2]. 
  6. 6. ‘Aging’ seems to be another opportunity for big pharma because the overall aging of the population will provide a big market for new age-related drugs. Indeed, current clinical trials are generating new blockbusters for those chronic diseases, and these future blockbuster markets are estimated to be in the region of approximately US$10–50 billion rather than US$5 billion today [2]. 
  7. 7. However, challenges remain with the opportunity, because these agerelated new drugs, such as CNS drugs, have only a 1% chance of reaching the market place after entering clinical development, compared with the industry average of 11% [3]. Obviously, it takes much more time and resources to develop them and, therefore, pharmaceutical companies must work on reducing risks of failure across the drug-development process by lowering development costs and shortening development time for these newly needed drugs.
  8. 8.  In other words, R&D must be performed with greater efficiency, major cost containment and faster speed, drug discovery must be streamlined and highly focused on achieving ‘proof of concept’ in humans, and productivity must be improved with a minimum increase of the resources [2]. In short, ‘doing more with less’ has become the present objective of many pharmaceutical companies.
  9. 9. Tougher regulations are another challenge the pharmaceutical industry is facing. For instance, the FDA Amendment Act (FDAAA), issued in September 2007, empowers the FDA with greater control over drug safety. Under the guideline of safety first/safe use, the FDA requires more postmarketing studies/trials, safety-related labeling and risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) to ensure that benefits outweigh risks based on pre- and post-safety information [4]. 
  10. 10. In addition, the recently issued FDA guidelines on metabolites in safety testing (MIST) clearly state that a more extensive characterization of the pharmacokinetics of unique and/or major human metabolites (UMMs; known as ‘disproportionate metabolites’ in the MIST document) is needed. 
  11. 11. This is due to the recent belief that characterization of UMMs could provide greater insight into the connection between metabolites and toxicological observations, based on plenty of evidence that metabolites were the cause of certain drug withdrawals and black-box warnings.
  12. 12. “…even if the market for generic drugs is huge, the competition among generic companies themselves has become tougher, which is quickly reducing the prices, hence lowering the profits for generic drug companies.”
  13. 13. Generic drug companies appear to do better than big pharmaceutical companies. It is forecasted that they will continue to grow, due to the patent expiration of a large number of branded drugs. For example, blockbuster drugs like atorvastatin (Pfizer, for treatment of high cholesterol), olanzapine (Eli Lilly, for treatment of schizophrenia), valsartan (Novartis, for treatment of hypertension) and pantoprazole (Wyeth, for treatment of gastrointestinal disorders) will all expire in the next few years. 
  14. 14. In addition, there is also the increasing government promotion of generic drugs to counter growing healthcare drug expenditure. However, even if the market for generic drugs is huge, the competition among generic companies themselves has become tougher, which is quickly reducing the prices, hence lowering the profits for generic drug companies. 
  15. 15. For the full Bioanalysis publication, please visit Wei Garofolo's professional website

×