Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

SMART MOBILITY IN SMART CITIES

1,815 views

Published on

Presentation gave at the occasion of the 2015 CINEV (China International New Energy in Hong Kong Vehicle Show, 24-26 november 2015 - ROUND TABLE 2 Success stories of Urbanization & New Concepts of cities in Europe and
China

Published in: Environment
  • Protect your brain from memory loss with brain pill. find out more... ▲▲▲ https://tinyurl.com/brainpill101
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

SMART MOBILITY IN SMART CITIES

  1. 1. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 1 CINEV — China International New Energy Vehicle Show SMART MOBILITY IN SMART CITIES 24-25-26 November, Asia-World Expo Hong Kong Round Table 2: Success stories of Urbanization & New Concepts of cities in Europe and China 17:00 – 18:00pm, Tuesday 24 November 2015. BUSINESS MODELS AND THE DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS IN THE SMART-MOBILITY SECTOR
  2. 2. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 2 Sylvie Faucheux, Professor of Economics, LIRSA, CNAM (Paris, France)
  3. 3. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS — BUSINESS MODELS AND THE DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS IN THE SMART-MOBILITY SECTOR 1. Smart-Mobility : The Context and the Challenges 2. From Disruptive Innovation to New Business Models 3. The French Example of VEDECOM Institute 4. Conclusions
  4. 4. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 4 1. SMART-MOBILITY : THE CONTEXT AND THE CHALLENGES • Smart-Mobility solutions are disruptive innovations involving paradigm shifts because it is linked to radical technological innovations and to end-use innovations. One of the most striking features is the vision of the automobile not as a possession but as simply an element in the mobility chain. An illustration is the B2B model, where a mobility operator makes available to users the means of transport adapted to their needs (e.g., a real-time multimodal service; Peugeot’s Mu; the Orange fleet of ‘connected’ vehicles; Citroën with a high degree of personalisation of the vehicle). This combination of new technological possibilities and new conceptions of the mobility “needs”, has the effect of completely reshuffling the deck as far as market opportunity.
  5. 5. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 5 • Smart-Mobility impacts on the structure of supply and the patterns of goods/service demand. • Smart-Mobility is provoking substantial change to the existing “ecosystem” of mobility markets. For example, on the supply side: a pronounced shift in the mix of partners in the value chain with, (1) integration of ‘new’ actors notably from the electrical, electronics and information technology sectors; and, (2) modification of the roles (and in some cases the disappearance altogether) of traditional partners (for example, the distributors of refined petroleum products have a much reduced place in the production and servicing of electric cars…). THE EVOLVING ECOSYSTEM OF SMART-MOBILITY INNOVATION
  6. 6. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 6
  7. 7. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 7 The Questions…. - How innovation waves coming from different sectors can be linked or melded? - What are the impacts of the merging business models for the diffusion of these innovations on the wider “ecosystem” of mobility ?
  8. 8. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 8 1. FROM DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION TO NEW BUSINESS MODELS The business model for a disruptive innovation is a tool of creative destruction, it is integrative in new ways of the factors and partners in value creation. • These new partnerships involves a new cooperative economic governance : ØA behavioural component: the actors should be united in a “win-win” logic, with an attitude of shared or reciprocal confidence in. ØA knowledge management component: procedures for information sharing. ØAn organisational component: The partners has to seek to establish frameworks such as joint projects or task forces requiring collaboration between partners, in this way both promoting mutual understanding and encouraging “fair play. • To have the benefice of a Shared Value according to “open innovation” or “Open business”: ØPromoting the explicit alignment of the interests of business partners, so as to provide a clear basis for cooperation.
  9. 9. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 9 ØEnsuring the coordination of joint work programs with a clear division of labour agreed by all parties and accountability on terms of results. ØEnsuring that the added-value created in collaboration of shared in an equitable way and not appropriated by one partner in the commercial relation.
  10. 10. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 10 3.The French Example of VEDECOM Institute Véhicule Décarboné Communicant et sa Mobilité /Carbon-free, communicating vehicle and its mobility • VEDECOM is one of a small number of national Institutes for Energy Transition set up in France during the past five years as part of the Plan d’Investissement d’Avenir (the French national long-term research and technology investment plan for the future). • VEDECOM is based in Versailles and is supported logistically and financially by Mov’eo (the French mobility business cluster) and by local governance communities.
  11. 11. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 11 • • • Urbanization plan of the park on ‘Mobilities of the future’ with VeDeCoM ("Charte paysagère et urbaine de Versailles Satory-Ouest", Etablissement Public Paris-Saclay, 2013)
  12. 12. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 12 • VEDECOM intends to become a leading European institute for Smart-Mobility . As set up in 2012, the Institute comprises more than 40 members of industry and service sectors (automotive, aeronautics, system engineering, electronic components, ITC, numerical simulation, infrastructure management, transport operators, digital and energy grid operators), plus research and higher education institutions, and of local communities. • The VEDECOM partners have agreed to collaborate on a spectrum of pre-competitive and pre-normative research subjects. ØThe research and demonstration activities at VEDECOM are organized in two programmes: "Vehicles" on the one-hand, "Eco-Mobility" on the other hand. ØThe projects belong to three research domains on "Vehicle Electrification", "Driving Delegation and Connectivity" (which cuts across the two domains), and "Shared Mobility and Energy" in terms of infrastructure and services. Each domain comprises several research projects on technology and service bricks and associated demonstrators. Source : http://vedecom.fr/en/.
  13. 13. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 13 THE VEDECOM COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH THEMES
  14. 14. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 14 • The VEDECOM Institute is based on a novel and unprecedented collaboration between industries of the automotive sector, infrastructure and services operators in the mobility eco-system, academic research institutions, and local communities. • The institutional innovation has broken down old boundaries and built new relationships at all levels, in order to engage an “open innovation” process in several senses of the term: open to new ideas, open to new business models with consumers, open to new working relationships with territorial authorities (mobility services, networks and infrastructures). • The VEDECOM partners identify explicitly the challenge of building a common platform as a springboard for launching into an as-yet poorly defined future. Among the mechanisms of collaboration, they have defined: Á A domain of pre-competitive innovation and intellectual property (IP) . Á A phase of pre-normative activity, prior to establishment of regulations, at local, national and European levels.
  15. 15. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 15 4. CONCLUSIONS The open innovation process is very much larger than simple sharing of technologies and know-how. It extends to the “invention” and the governance of partner relations, with the accent on ongoing team building in the search of new shared opportunities. Á On the supply side: As in the VeDeCom consortium, the challenge taken up is for the partners to be a “winner” collectively, not one to win against others in the team. Á On the demand side: Infrastructure development in support of smart-mobility (e.g., frequent & accessible electric car charge points; cheap and reliable data services for modal shifts, etc..) is a necessary condition for uptake of smart-mobility innovations.
  16. 16. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 16 Thank you Sylvie Faucheux, Professor of Economics, LIRSA, CNAM (Paris, France) Isabelle Nicolaï, Professor of Economics, Laboratoire Génie Industriel, CentraleSupélec, UPSay (France) & Martin O’Connor, Professor of Economics, REEDS, UPSay (France)
  17. 17. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 17
  18. 18. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 18
  19. 19. CINEV – Hong Kong (24 November 2015) © Sylvie Faucheux, Isabelle Nicolaï, Martin O’Connor — Smart Mobility in Smart Cities Presentation — Page 19

×