Water Resources Planning and Governance in Highly Contested Rivers

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Water Resources Planning and Governance in Highly Contested Rivers

  1. 1. Water  Resources  Planning  and  Governance  in  Highly  Contested  Rivers   RiverSymposium,  9  October  2012     Robert  Speed   Okeanos  Pty  Ltd      
  2. 2. The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again.
  3. 3. gregated global gap between existing accessible, reliableply1 and 2030 water withdrawals, assuming no efficiency gainm3, 154 basins/regions 6,900 2% 900 CAGR -40% 2,800 1,500 Municipal & 4,500 4,200 Domestic 100 600 700 Groundwater Industry 800 Relevant supply quantity is much lower that the 4,500 absolute renewable water availability in nature 3,500 Surface water Agriculture 3,100 Existing 2030 Basins with Basins with Existing withdrawals2 withdrawals3 deficits surplus accessible, reliable, sustainable supply1 Units:  billion  m3  ng supply which canSource:  Mat 90% reliability, based on historical hydrology and infrastructure investments scheduled through 2010; net of be provided ckinsey,  2009,  Char%ng  our  Water   nmental requirements Future  d on 2010 agricultural production analyses from IFPRId on GDP, population projections and agricultural production projections from IFPRI; considers no water productivity gains between 2005-2030E: Water 2030 Global Water Supply and Demand model; agricultural production based on IFPRI IMPACT-WATER base case
  4. 4. Historical  PerspecHves  and   Approaches   Infrastructure & Systemic water Growth & water use resources development• water resource (surface) • catchment (IWRM) • political-economic• reconciliation • resource protection • inter-sectoral• demand projections • demand management • uncertainty (change)• water supply regulation • WQ management • water as catalyst/const• system optimisation • stakeholder engagement • adaptive management pre-­‐1970’s   1980’s  &  1990s   2000’s  
  5. 5. Issue  1.    •  In  heavily  contested  basins,  it  is  oQen  no   longer  possible  to  allocate  and  manage  water   resources  to  meet  all  developmental   demands.  •  Water  is  both  a  major  constraint  and  also  a   catalyst  for  economic  development.   ShiQ  from  “water  for  the  economy”  to   “water  in  the  economy”  
  6. 6. The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again.Lesson:    Water  plans  and  development  plans  should  be  developed  through  an  itera6ve  process    
  7. 7. Issue  2.  •  People  –  and  what  they  value  –  maXer  in   water  resources  management.  All  the  more  so   in  contested  basins.  
  8. 8. Lesson:    Understand  the  social  and  cultural  values  and  incorporate  those  in  the  process  
  9. 9. Issue  3.  •  Where  water  resources  development  offers   clear  social  and  economic  benefits,   environmental  protecHon  needs  to   demonstrate  an  equally  compelling  case.          In  developing  countries,  this  is  even  more    criHcal.    
  10. 10. 95%   decline  in   fish  fry  Lesson:  the  importance  of  good  science  and  monitoring  only  increases  as  basins  become  more  contested  
  11. 11. Issue  4.  •  Challenges  associated  with  water  security  are   intricately  linked  with  issues  related  to  food   and  energy  security  
  12. 12. Lesson:    Understand  the  connec6ons,  the  dependencies,  and  the  costs  and  benefits  
  13. 13. Issue  5.  •  Having  an  aspiraHonal  vision  for  a  basin  can   promote  a  long-­‐term  view    BUT    may  not  always  provide  guidance  on  how    trade-­‐offs    should  be  managed  
  14. 14. Lesson:    Acknowledge  that  you  can’t  have  everything  and  decide  what  it  is  you  want  from  the  basin     Pegram  et  al.,  2012  
  15. 15. Thank  you!  

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