Wt5912 2012 u7-w9

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Special Needs Education in Technology Settings

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Wt5912 2012 u7-w9

  1. 1. TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION ANDWORKSHOP PRACTICE 2:MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION: PROVISIONSPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION FOR SPECIAL NEEDSUNIT 7: WEEK 9 EDUCATION IN TECHNOLOGYCourse Involved: Graduate Diploma in Technology Education SETTINGSUniversity of LimerickDepartment of Design & Manufacturing TechnologyLecturer/Teacher: Mr. Joseph LysterAcademic Year 2012: Spring SemesterTechnical Support: Mr. Joe Murray & Mr. Richie HennessyNotes Prepared by: Mr. Joseph LysterAvailable on www.slideshare.net/WT4603 UNIVERSITY of LIMERICK OLLSCOIL LUIMNIGH
  2. 2. SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATIONHistory: In the past, students with special educational needs were sometimes overlooked in school settings. This stemmed from a lack of knowledge and understanding about learning difficulties. Students with learning difficulties were often stigmatized or regarded as non-academics. However, over the past number of years psychological, physiological and sociological research has classified various forms of behavioural, psychological and physical disabilities. Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  3. 3. SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATIONBroad Definition:‘Any educational provision which is designedto cater for pupils with special educationalneeds, and is additional to or different fromthe provision which is generally made inordinary classes for pupils of the same age.’ (SERC, 1993) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  4. 4. CATERING FOR DISABILITIES There is a wide range of special schools catering for various types and levels of disability, including sensory impairment and physical disability This may range from a physical disability to exceptional or gifted ability in a particular area. Such a broad definition has implications for practice and also for the essential resources required by individual students. (NCCA, 1999) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  5. 5. CATERING FOR DISABILITIES Their difficulties may be specific to language or mathematics or can come from a physical impairment that affects their movement, sight, or hearing, or from a complex combination of several disabilities. Some of these may be addressed by the provision of alternative teaching methods, suitable materials, appropriately adapted equipment, or personalised tutorial support. However, this approach tends to focus on the difficulties of the student rather than on his or her individual needs. (NCCA, 1999) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  6. 6. T YPES OF DISABILITIES/DIFFICULTIES General learning disabilities Emotional and behavioural disturbance Language and communication difficulties and disorders Physical and sensory disabilities. (SERC, 1993) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  7. 7. SERC REPORTSERC Report: Recommendations Students with special educational needs have a right to an appropriate education The needs of the individual student are paramount in decisions relating to their education Parents should have an active role within the system A continuum of educational services should be provided and, where Practicable, appropriate education should be provided in ordinary schools for all students with special educational needs Only in exceptional circumstances should a student have to live away from home to avail of an appropriate education The state should provide adequate resources to enable students with special educational needs to avail of an appropriate (NCCA, 1999) education. Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  8. 8. IRISH POST-PRIMARY The Education Act (1998) refers to particular reference to the role of the NCCA in advising the Minister for Education and Science on the curriculum for students with a disability or other special educational needs. In 2002, to fulfil this remit, the NCCA developed draft guidelines for teachers of students with general learning disabilities. To gain insights into the value of the guidelines to teachers, schools and parents, the NCCA embarked on a series of consultations during the period 2002-2004. The findings of this consultation process resulted in the development of the ‘Guidelines for Teachers of Students with General Learning Disabilities’ (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  9. 9. GUIDELINESDepartment of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  10. 10. DIVISION OF NEEDS Special needs education in Ireland is divided into the following: 1. Students with mild general learning disabilities 2. Students with moderate general learning disabilities 3. Students with severe and profound general learning disabilities (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  11. 11. MILD LEARNING DISABILITIES: INDICATORS  Delayed conceptual development and limited ability to generalise  Difficulty expressing ideas and feelings in words  Limited attention span and retention  Clumsiness and difficulties with motor skills  Underdeveloped sense of spatial awareness  Difficulty adapting to new situations. (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  12. 12. MODERATE LEARNING DISABILITIES: INDICATORS  limited concentration  passivity  delayed oral language development  difficulty in adapting to their environment  limited ability to generalise  difficulties in problem solving. (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  13. 13. SEVERE & PROFOUND LEARNING DISABILITIES: INDICATORS The material in the guidelines for teachers of students with severe and profound general learning disabilities is laid out in three broad bands: 1. Attending; 2. Responding; and 3. Initiating. learning targeted at a very early developmental level consideration of additional motor and/or sensory difficulties basic self-care needs significant needs in the area of communication, with strategies for non-verbal communication being critical significant emotional and/or behavioural needs that affect learning and social interaction specific help in generalising concepts and skills to enable them to accommodate to a change of context. (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  14. 14. LEARNER INTELLIGENCE Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  15. 15. EXCEPTIONALLY ABLE STUDENT: CAPABILIT Y Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  16. 16. Students with Mild Learning Difficulties in Technology Education Settings Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  17. 17. A DESIGN PROCESS: POTENTIAL AREAS OF DIFFICULT Y - TECHNOLOGY WOOD Being overwhelmed by the learning process. Short attention span and lack of concentration. Understanding concepts (difficulties associated with the non-linear nature of the design process). Limited vocabulary (understanding technical language). Language/writing. Spatial awareness (drawing/sketching, organisation of the workspace). Transfer to real life—difficulty transferring design intent to practice. Calculating (adding, measuring). Co-ordination (use of tools, fear of machinery). (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  18. 18. STRATEGIES Using a spiral approach, i.e. introducing the design process at basic level initially and fostering broader and deeper understandings in subsequent projects. Using individual student worksheets to differentiate each stage, in booklet form. Using an overview/diary worksheet. Presenting relevant terminology and allowing space to write/copy simplified meanings. Encouraging the use of graphical communication where appropriate. Working in pairs/small groups where appropriate. Using concrete materials. Using templates as appropriate. (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  19. 19. RESOURCES Pieces of wood/other material pre-prepared to various sizes to enable students to experiment with and express different design possibilities. Magazines showing concrete examples of associated models. Material and equipment for making the chosen model. Design activity sheets. (NCCA, 2007) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  20. 20. PHYSICAL DISABILIT YPhysical skills:These skills range from basic mobility and positioning andphysical activation through an understanding of spatialawareness, and fine and gross motor skills to specificskills required for a purpose, for example writing, sports orleisure skills. (NCCA, 1999) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  21. 21. ROOM LAYOUTPhysical Disability: (T4, 2008) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology
  22. 22. ROOM LAYOUTPhysical Disability: (T4, 2008) Department of Design & Manufacturing Technology

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