“ What is making a difference in the highest improving schools in the state?” OSPI January 2009 Conference Sue Mills Execu...
<ul><li>Field-based research, service, and data-centric tools to support School & District Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>P...
Welcome!  In this session we will: <ul><li>Discuss impact of culture (Nine Characteristics) upon school performance </li><...
“ The relationship among the adults in the schoolhouse has more impact on the quality and the character of the schoolhouse...
Is there a relationship between the Nine Characteristics and student achievement?
Remembering the 2008 Award Winners <ul><li>94 schools were identified as the “highest  improving ” schools </li></ul><ul><...
School Student Demographics <ul><li>Poverty ranges from 1% to 82%. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>16  have greater than 50% poverty...
ESD Representation <ul><li>101 = 13  (6) </li></ul><ul><li>105 = 5  (9) </li></ul><ul><li>112 = 7  (8) </li></ul><ul><li>1...
Elementary Schools RMLI 2002-03
Elementary Schools RMLI 2008
Middle Schools RMLI 2002-03
Middle Schools RMLI 2008
High Schools RMLI 2002-03
High Schools RMLI 2008
Let’s look at a repeat winner . . . East Port Orchard Elem  South Kitsap SD
Reading Achievement Lower than state 2 of 5 yrs Lower than district 4 of 5 yrs. Above state and district the last 2 years
 
Math Achievement Lower than state 4 of 5 years Lower than district 5 of 5 yrs Above state and district the last 2 years
49% NOT meeting standard to 77% MEETING standard All Schools of Distinction  accelerated Reading  and . . .
 
. . . accelerated Math as well . 65% NOT meeting standard to 63% MEETING standard
What about the Nine Characteristics?    Do they matter?
<ul><li>“… (don’t) aim only for kids. Adults are only kids grown up, anyway.” </li></ul><ul><li>Walt Disney </li></ul>
The following 6 slides were prepared by G. Sue Shannon, Ed.D. OSPI Senior Researcher August 2007
Nine Characteristics  of High-Performing Schools <ul><li>A clear & shared focus </li></ul><ul><li>High standards & expecta...
Second Edition:  Expanded Concepts <ul><li>Effective processes for improving schools </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded perspectiv...
Relationships among characteristics
Nine Characteristics Resource  -- 2 nd  Ed. the review process <ul><li>Reviewers examined original document & suggested re...
Conclusions from review <ul><li>The original research-base has not changed; nine characteristics are still viable, thus ma...
“ Culture influences everything that happens in a school – including student achievement”  (Tony Wagner 2006)
This session will use EES perceptual data to quantify the presence of the Nine Characteristics in 48 of the most improving...
In addition – we will use EES data from the past 15 months as a comparison set – a representative sample of 322 WA public ...
Where in this state? School of Distinction Winners WA Comparison Set
Job position of respondents WA Comparison Set School of Distinction Winners
What level of school? WA Comparison Set School of Distinction Winners
Sample elems v SOD elems
 
The next slides divide the SOD winners into 3 groups and contrast those 3 groups with each other as well as the comparison...
The Four Groups: <ul><li>SOD 2007  = 875  </li></ul><ul><li>SOD 2008  = 321 </li></ul><ul><li>SOD repeat winners  = 391  <...
The 10,000 foot view
 
High Standards and Expectations
Collaboration and Communication
Supportive Learning Environment
Monitoring of Teaching and Learning
Focused Professional Development
Curriculum-Instruction-Assessment
 
Let’s come back to our example School of Distinction – East Port Orchard Elementary
East Port Orchard Elem 12-08
This is EPO’s data over time . . .
What about Trust?:  The “Glue” That Makes us Whole <ul><li>“ You must trust and believe in people or life becomes impossib...
EPO’s Organizational Trust
EPO Trust In Comparison
From the Superintendent of South Kitsap S.D. - David LaRose: <ul><li>I begin virtually all presentations with our message ...
” Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast ” <ul><li>Values and culture stand out as one of the strongest and most consistent c...
An example – the impact of a PLC on the culture of a building
A Culture of Collaboration <ul><li>Improved districts build a culture of commitment, collegiality, mutual respect, and sta...
System Support <ul><li>The key, is not simply that the successful schools have data – it’s who is using the data and how t...
Measuring and Reporting <ul><li>Successful turnarounds are typically marked by measuring and reporting data frequently and...
High Quality Teaching and Learning The Instructional Work of the Organization <ul><li>Reduce isolation and open practice u...
References You Can Use <ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2004).   Knowing the Right Things to Do:  School Impr...
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Gene's SOD Presentation

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Sod Year 2 2008

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  • Gene's SOD Presentation

    1. 1. “ What is making a difference in the highest improving schools in the state?” OSPI January 2009 Conference Sue Mills Executive Director
    2. 2. <ul><li>Field-based research, service, and data-centric tools to support School & District Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships with 500 Schools in 100 districts in WA </li></ul><ul><li>Assist all schools & districts in WA School & District Improvement programs (125 schools and 41 districts) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What we do & how we do it varies based on serving districts from 80 students K-12, to districts over 30,000 K-12. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The largest database of school effectiveness information in the state of Washington (Nine Characteristics of High Performing Schools) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>44,000 Staff (from 515 distinct schools) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>118,000 Students (30% from homes where English is not primary language) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>41,000 Parents (30% from homes where English is not primary language) </li></ul></ul>Data and CEE
    3. 3. Welcome! In this session we will: <ul><li>Discuss impact of culture (Nine Characteristics) upon school performance </li></ul><ul><li>Present Nine Characteristics survey findings from 2007 and 2008 Schools of Distinction </li></ul><ul><li>Compare SOD to a sample of WA schools gathered over same period of time </li></ul><ul><li>Hear from “the field” on the strategic value of the Nine Characteristics data (perceptual) </li></ul>
    4. 4. “ The relationship among the adults in the schoolhouse has more impact on the quality and the character of the schoolhouse – and on the accomplishments of youngsters – than any other factor.”                                                   – Barth, 2001
    5. 5. Is there a relationship between the Nine Characteristics and student achievement?
    6. 6. Remembering the 2008 Award Winners <ul><li>94 schools were identified as the “highest improving ” schools </li></ul><ul><li>53 elementary schools (14 repeat) </li></ul><ul><li>21 middle schools (3 repeat) </li></ul><ul><li>20 high schools (4 repeat) </li></ul>
    7. 7. School Student Demographics <ul><li>Poverty ranges from 1% to 82%. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>16 have greater than 50% poverty </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ESL/ELL ranges from 0% to 31% </li></ul><ul><li>21 - have more than the state average for ESL students served (state average is 7%) </li></ul><ul><li>31 are east of the Cascades </li></ul><ul><li>63 are west of the Cascades </li></ul><ul><li>32 are Title I Schoolwide </li></ul>
    8. 8. ESD Representation <ul><li>101 = 13 (6) </li></ul><ul><li>105 = 5 (9) </li></ul><ul><li>112 = 7 (8) </li></ul><ul><li>113 = 5 (9) </li></ul><ul><li>114 = 3 (5) </li></ul><ul><li>121 = 33 (21) </li></ul><ul><li>123 = 4 (10) </li></ul><ul><li>171 = 9 (11) </li></ul><ul><li>189 = 14 (7) </li></ul>(Last year)
    9. 9. Elementary Schools RMLI 2002-03
    10. 10. Elementary Schools RMLI 2008
    11. 11. Middle Schools RMLI 2002-03
    12. 12. Middle Schools RMLI 2008
    13. 13. High Schools RMLI 2002-03
    14. 14. High Schools RMLI 2008
    15. 15. Let’s look at a repeat winner . . . East Port Orchard Elem South Kitsap SD
    16. 16. Reading Achievement Lower than state 2 of 5 yrs Lower than district 4 of 5 yrs. Above state and district the last 2 years
    17. 18. Math Achievement Lower than state 4 of 5 years Lower than district 5 of 5 yrs Above state and district the last 2 years
    18. 19. 49% NOT meeting standard to 77% MEETING standard All Schools of Distinction accelerated Reading and . . .
    19. 21. . . . accelerated Math as well . 65% NOT meeting standard to 63% MEETING standard
    20. 22. What about the Nine Characteristics? Do they matter?
    21. 23. <ul><li>“… (don’t) aim only for kids. Adults are only kids grown up, anyway.” </li></ul><ul><li>Walt Disney </li></ul>
    22. 24. The following 6 slides were prepared by G. Sue Shannon, Ed.D. OSPI Senior Researcher August 2007
    23. 25. Nine Characteristics of High-Performing Schools <ul><li>A clear & shared focus </li></ul><ul><li>High standards & expectations for all students </li></ul><ul><li>Effective school leadership </li></ul><ul><li>High levels of collaboration & communication </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum, instruction & assessments aligned with state standards </li></ul><ul><li>Frequent monitoring of learning & teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Focused professional development </li></ul><ul><li>A supportive learning environment </li></ul><ul><li>High levels of family & community involvement </li></ul>
    24. 26. Second Edition: Expanded Concepts <ul><li>Effective processes for improving schools </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded perspectives on effective leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Relational trust </li></ul><ul><li>Quality instruction, grading practices, monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Professional learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural competence & culturally responsive teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Family & community engagement in schools </li></ul><ul><li>High school improvement </li></ul><ul><li>District improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Need-based allocation of resources (funding, staffing, & support) </li></ul>
    25. 27. Relationships among characteristics
    26. 28. Nine Characteristics Resource -- 2 nd Ed. the review process <ul><li>Reviewers examined original document & suggested revisions & new resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Author reviewed recent research studies & professional literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Author revised document to expand & deepen the discussion of the characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>OSPI documents were added to pertinent characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewers read & commented on second edition. </li></ul>
    27. 29. Conclusions from review <ul><li>The original research-base has not changed; nine characteristics are still viable, thus maintained. </li></ul><ul><li>Characteristics are explained and developed for deeper understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation ideas are expanded using current research and professional literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic illustrates relationships between & among characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>School improvement cycle of inquiry is suggested. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools and districts must move beyond planning to doing to close the “knowing-doing gap.” </li></ul>
    28. 30. “ Culture influences everything that happens in a school – including student achievement” (Tony Wagner 2006)
    29. 31. This session will use EES perceptual data to quantify the presence of the Nine Characteristics in 48 of the most improving schools (top 5%) in the state of Washington
    30. 32. In addition – we will use EES data from the past 15 months as a comparison set – a representative sample of 322 WA public schools (16,937)
    31. 33. Where in this state? School of Distinction Winners WA Comparison Set
    32. 34. Job position of respondents WA Comparison Set School of Distinction Winners
    33. 35. What level of school? WA Comparison Set School of Distinction Winners
    34. 36. Sample elems v SOD elems
    35. 38. The next slides divide the SOD winners into 3 groups and contrast those 3 groups with each other as well as the comparison MDB group.
    36. 39. The Four Groups: <ul><li>SOD 2007 = 875 </li></ul><ul><li>SOD 2008 = 321 </li></ul><ul><li>SOD repeat winners = 391 </li></ul><ul><li>(TOTAL SOD = 1,587 ) </li></ul><ul><li>MDB Comparison Set = 16,937 </li></ul><ul><li>(WA 9/07 – 12/08) </li></ul>
    37. 40. The 10,000 foot view
    38. 42. High Standards and Expectations
    39. 43. Collaboration and Communication
    40. 44. Supportive Learning Environment
    41. 45. Monitoring of Teaching and Learning
    42. 46. Focused Professional Development
    43. 47. Curriculum-Instruction-Assessment
    44. 49. Let’s come back to our example School of Distinction – East Port Orchard Elementary
    45. 50. East Port Orchard Elem 12-08
    46. 51. This is EPO’s data over time . . .
    47. 52. What about Trust?: The “Glue” That Makes us Whole <ul><li>“ You must trust and believe in people or life becomes impossible.” </li></ul><ul><li>Anton Chekov </li></ul><ul><li>“ If we don’t have trust in each other, then we will always find reasons not to win” </li></ul>
    48. 53. EPO’s Organizational Trust
    49. 54. EPO Trust In Comparison
    50. 55. From the Superintendent of South Kitsap S.D. - David LaRose: <ul><li>I begin virtually all presentations with our message of values, beliefs and culture as the “why” behind all decisions about “what” we do. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Culture always should precede programs. If teams of people do not improve, a school never will.&quot; </li></ul>
    51. 56. ” Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast ” <ul><li>Values and culture stand out as one of the strongest and most consistent contrasts between beat-the-odds schools and the comparison schools. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    52. 57. An example – the impact of a PLC on the culture of a building
    53. 58. A Culture of Collaboration <ul><li>Improved districts build a culture of commitment, collegiality, mutual respect, and stability. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional culture of high standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trust, mutual respect, and competence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunities for peer support, collaboration, and develop professional learning communities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Shannon & Bylsma (2004) </li></ul>
    54. 59. System Support <ul><li>The key, is not simply that the successful schools have data – it’s who is using the data and how they use the data. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006) </li></ul>
    55. 60. Measuring and Reporting <ul><li>Successful turnarounds are typically marked by measuring and reporting data frequently and publically. </li></ul><ul><li>School Turnarounds (2007) </li></ul>
    56. 61. High Quality Teaching and Learning The Instructional Work of the Organization <ul><li>Reduce isolation and open practice up to direct observation, analysis, and feedback. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make direct observation of practice, analysis, and feedback a routine feature of work. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Elmore (2000, 2002, and 2004) </li></ul>
    57. 62. References You Can Use <ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2004). Knowing the Right Things to Do: School Improvement and Performance-Based Accountability. Washington, D.C.: National Governors Association- Center for Best Practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Marzano, R. (2003). What Works in Schools: Translating Research Into Action. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat The Odds (2006). Morrison Institute for Public Policy (2006). Why Some Schools With Latino Children Beat the Odds…and Others Don’t. Tempe, AZ.: Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University, jointly with Center for the Future of Arizona. (aka: “Beat The Odds (2006) ). </li></ul><ul><li>School Turnarounds (2007). Public Impact (2007). School Turnarounds: A review of the cross-sector evidence on dramatic organizational improvement. Public Impact, Academic Development Institute- prepared for the Center on Innovation and Improvement. Retrieved from : http://www.centerii.org / (aka: School Turnarounds (2007)). </li></ul><ul><li>Shannon, G.S. & Bylsma, P. (2004). Characteristics of Improved School Districts: Themes from Research. Olympia, WA. Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>Shannon, G.S. & Bylsma, P. (2003). Nine Characteristics of High Performing Schools. A research-based resource for school leadership teams to assist with the School Improvement Process. Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Olympia, WA. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE) (2005). Longitudinal Change in Staff Perceptions of the 9 Characteristics of High Performing Schools in OSPI SIA Cohort-II and III Schools. Redmond, WA: Center for Educational Effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2000). Building a New Structure For School Leadership . Washington, D.C.: The Albert Shanker Institute. </li></ul><ul><li>Elmore, R. (2002). Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement. Washington, D.C.: The Albert Shanker Institute. </li></ul><ul><li>Quinn, R. and Rohrbaugh, J. (1983). A spatial model of effectiveness criteria: Toward a competing values approach to organizational analysis. Management Science, 29(3), 363-377. </li></ul><ul><li>Tschannen-Moran, (2004). Trust Matters, Leadership for Successful Schools. San Francisco, CA. Jossey-Bass. </li></ul>

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