Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
NFIP OverviewFlood Risk Information System     Elevation Certificate        By: Maureen O’Shea, AICP, CFM                 ...
Example: Elevated Home    North Carolina Emergency Management
Purposes of the NFIPIdentify & map flood hazard areasProvide a framework for floodplain management  regulationsMake flood ...
Effects of Hurricane Floyd on NC                                 51 deaths                                 $3.5 billion in...
NFIP BackgroundPrior to the creation of the NFIP in 1968:Flood insurance coverage was not availableNo national flood mappi...
NFIP GoalsReduce loss of life & loss of propertyReduce rising disaster relief costsIncrease importance of hazard mitigatio...
NFIP To join NFIP, communities must submit: Resolution of intent to “maintain in force…adequate land use & control measure...
CommunityIssuing or denying floodplain development &/or  building permitsInspecting all development to ensure  compliance ...
Sanctions for Non-ParticipationNo Federal grants or loans for development in Special Flood  Hazard Areas (SFHAs) under Fed...
NFIP RegulationsCommunities must adopt & enforce ordinances that meet or exceed NFIP criteriaNFIP criteria ensures that ne...
Definition: FloodA “flood” is defined by the NFIP as “a temporarycondition of partial or complete inundation ofnormally dr...
Definition: FloodplainAny land area susceptible to inundation by water from any source                            Floodpla...
Flood Zone Designations    North Carolina Emergency Management
Flood Zone Designations Shaded X is a.k.a. 500-year storm event        North Carolina Emergency Management
Hurricane Irene, Aurora, NC      North Carolina Emergency Management
Example: Elevated Modular Home        North Carolina Emergency Management
Biloxi, MS, April 1, 2006 - Beauvoir, the National Historic Landmark home of Jefferson Davis, is one of very few woodenhom...
Biloxi, Miss., August 19, 2010 - Construction is complete on the   Jefferson Davis Home. The house was heavily damaged byH...
After Hurricane Katrina    North Carolina Emergency Management
After Elevation & Restoration       North Carolina Emergency Management
Elevation Certificate  North Carolina Emergency Management
Newest Elevation CertificateNew version of the Elevation Certificate (EC) effective August 1, 2013 – July 31, 2015.Availab...
Elevation Certificate Form             Verify Regulatory compliance             Flood Insurance Policy Rating           ...
The Community’s EC ReviewCommunity Officials must review EC’s before accepting them.This ensures:    Completeness    Rea...
Section A (no changes)   North Carolina Emergency Management
Sections A1-A3 Complete all items, except “For Insurance Company Use”. A1. Building Owner’s(s’) Name(s) A2. Building Ad...
Section A4 A4. Building Use - residential, non-residential, an addition  to an existing residential or non-residential bu...
Section A5 Latitude/Longitude taken at the center of the front of the  building. Decimal degrees: provide coordinates to...
Sections A6 (a change) A6. Attach photographs showing at least the front & rear of the building. Must be in color & measu...
Sections A7 (no changes) A7. Enter the building diagram number that best represents the building. There are 10 building ...
Building Diagram 1A  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 1B  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 2  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 3  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 4  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 5  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 6  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 7  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 8  North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Diagram 9  North Carolina Emergency Management
Section A8a-bFor buildings with a crawlspace or enclosure(s):A8.a. Square footage of crawlspace or enclosure(s). Takemeas...
Section A8c A8.c. Calculate the total net area of all such permanent flood  openings in square inches, excluding any bars...
Section A8d     A8.d. Engineered flood openings. Attach a copy of the   Individual Engineered Flood Openings Certification...
Standards for Elevation             on Perimeter Wall Foundations In Zones A & AE, fully enclosed areas below the lowest ...
Hydrostatic Openings Permanent Opening in a Wall that Allowsthe Free Passage of Water in Both Directions,            AUTOM...
Minimum Requirements for           Foundation Openings Minimum of two openings on different sides of each enclosed  area....
Net area?   North Carolina Emergency Management
1 foot?North Carolina Emergency Management
This is < 1 footNorth Carolina Emergency Management
This is compliant                    North Carolina Emergency Management
Plexiglas cover.North Carolina Emergency Management                  This is a violation!!
Spray foam insulation. Emergency Management              North Carolina This is a violation!!
Engineered Openings/Vents      North Carolina Emergency Management
Section A9 (no changes) Same as Section A8, but for garage when the  garage is attached to the building. Use the Comment...
Sections B1-B9 (no changes) B1. Enter name of Community which has permitting jurisdiction. B4. Enter the 10 digit panel ...
Section B1-9 Complete the Elevation Certificate on the basis of  the FIRM in effect at the time of the  certification. A...
Title Block           Community names & CID           numbers           FIRM Panel Effective Date           10-digit Ma...
Sections B10-B12 B10. Check the box for source of BFE data. These are listed in the  order of preference. If the flooding...
Coastal Barrier Resource System  OPA                                       CBRS  11/16/1991                               ...
Section CNorth Carolina Emergency Management
Section C1 Item C1. The elevations to be entered in this section are  based on construction drawings, a building under  c...
Section C2 Enter the Benchmark Utilized. Provide the PID or other unique  identifier assigned by the maintainer of the be...
Section C2.a-d Items C2.a-c. Enter the building elevations (excluding the  attached garage) indicated by the selected bui...
Section C2.a-d A field survey is required for Items C2.a-h. For buildings in A zones:    Elevations should be measured ...
North Carolina Emergency Management
Lowest Floor in ZONE A, AEThe lowest floor                                     C2bis measured atthe top of thesub-floor, s...
Lowest Floor in ZONE V & VE                                                            C2aBottom of thelowest horizontal  ...
Section C2.e Enter the lowest platform elevation of the machinery & equipment. The elevation(s) for machinery & equipmen...
North Carolina Emergency Management
North Carolina Emergency Management
High WaterMark             North Carolina Emergency Management
Anchored Propane Tank                               Properly anchored    North Carolina Emergency Management
Section C2.f-h Item C2.f. Enter the lowest elevation of the ground, sidewalk,  or patio slab immediately next to the buil...
Section D (change)Original Signature & Seal are required         North Carolina Emergency Management
Section DUse the Comments section for as needed    clarifications, explanations, etc. .           North Carolina Emergency...
Photographs (change)At least 2 color photographs, 3” x 3”          North Carolina Emergency Management
Quick EC Review Form completed by a NC surveyor Surveyor/Engineer is providing data points Community Officials & Flood ...
NC     North Carolina Emergency Management
North Carolina Emergency Management
Hurricane Irene, Aurora, NC      North Carolina Emergency Management
Bolivar Peninsula, TX 10/15/08                        Hurricane Ike 20 ft. storm surge        North Carolina Emergency Man...
Gilchrist, TX                     8/16/09           Hurricane Ike, 20 ft. storm surge;Town of Gilchrist destroyed; only th...
Hurricane Sandy – Sea Bright NJ        North Carolina Emergency Management
Hurricane Sandy – Mantoloking NJ         North Carolina Emergency Management
Hurricane Sandy - Union Beach NJ        North Carolina Emergency Management
Hurricane Sandy – Union Beach NJ         North Carolina Emergency Management
Resources                            Resources:                     Flood Insurance Rate Maps                        www.n...
Contact InformationNC Geospatial & TechnologyManagement OfficeFloodplain Mapping Programwww.ncfloodmaps.comJohn Gerber, P....
Questions?Thank You!North Carolina Emergency Management
New Tool forFlood & Hazard Planning   Flood Risk Information System               (FRIS) Wilmington Regional Association o...
Flood Risk Information System (FRIS)          North Carolina Emergency Management
Older Map versus Digital MapDotey’s Branch in Jacksonville, NC          North Carolina Emergency Management
Digital Map2009 NC Statewide DFIRM Panel       North Carolina Emergency Management
Ingredients of a DFIRM            +Base Map             Topography           North Carolina Emergency Management
Building Footprints LayerReason for Development:To know what portion of the structure is in a flood zone    (e.g.: all i...
North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS DFIRM Map Symbology      North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS DFIRM Display   North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS Display View/Print/Map Export          North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS Preliminary DFIRM    North Carolina Emergency Management
Coming Attraction: Updated Hazard DataNCFMP is currently fundedto update 50 counties withnew / updated models.All coastal ...
Integrated Hazard Risk Management                                       (iRisk)         North Carolina Emergency Management
IHRM Scope: Hazard Identification Identifies & displays all natural hazards at different magnitude levels / annual frequen...
Current & Intended Uses Vulnerability & Hazard Risk Identification Loss Estimation Assistance with Recovery Operations...
FRIS Vulnerability/Risk Information          North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS Financial Vulnerability/Risk         North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS Reduce My Risk   North Carolina Emergency Management
FRIS Produce a FIRMETTE     North Carolina Emergency Management
10 Minute BreakNC Floodplain Mapping Contacts:     John Gerber, PE, CFM     State NFIP Coordinator         (919) 825-2317 ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

NFIP Overview Flood Risk Information System Elevation Certificate

4,262 views

Published on

By: Maureen O’Shea, AICP, CFM
NFIP Planner, North Carolina Emergency Management
March 13, 2013

Published in: Real Estate
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

NFIP Overview Flood Risk Information System Elevation Certificate

  1. 1. NFIP OverviewFlood Risk Information System Elevation Certificate By: Maureen O’Shea, AICP, CFM NFIP PlannerFor: Wilmington Regional Association of Realtors March 13, 2013 North Carolina Emergency Management
  2. 2. Example: Elevated Home North Carolina Emergency Management
  3. 3. Purposes of the NFIPIdentify & map flood hazard areasProvide a framework for floodplain management regulationsMake flood insurance available in Communities that participate in the NFIP North Carolina Emergency Management
  4. 4. Effects of Hurricane Floyd on NC 51 deaths $3.5 billion in damages to homes, roads, businesses, & infrastructure 31,000 jobs lost North Carolina Emergency Management
  5. 5. NFIP BackgroundPrior to the creation of the NFIP in 1968:Flood insurance coverage was not availableNo national flood mapping programNo Federal minimum standards for floodplainmanagementEscalating costs to taxpayers for flood disasterrelief North Carolina Emergency Management
  6. 6. NFIP GoalsReduce loss of life & loss of propertyReduce rising disaster relief costsIncrease importance of hazard mitigation (flood resistant construction, guide future development, & prohibit development in floodplains that would increase flood levels)Restore & protect natural resources & functions of floodplainsDecrease taxpayer-funded disaster costsMake Federally backed insurance coverage available to property owners North Carolina Emergency Management
  7. 7. NFIP To join NFIP, communities must submit: Resolution of intent to “maintain in force…adequate land use & control measures” & to cooperate with FEMA Their adopted floodplain management regulations (often are referenced within zoning ordinances, building codes, subdivision ordinances, sanitary ordinances, or floodplain ordinances) North Carolina Emergency Management
  8. 8. CommunityIssuing or denying floodplain development &/or building permitsInspecting all development to ensure compliance with local ordinancesMaintaining records of floodplain developmentAssisting in preparation & revision of floodplain mapsHelping residents obtain information on flood hazards, floodplain map data, flood insurance, & proper construction measures North Carolina Emergency Management
  9. 9. Sanctions for Non-ParticipationNo Federal grants or loans for development in Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHAs) under Federal programsNo Federal disaster assistance to repair insurable buildings located in SFHAsNo Federal mortgage insurance or loan guarantees in SFHAsFederally insured or regulated lenders must notify applicants seeking loans in SFHAs that:  There is a flood hazard  The property is not eligible for Federal disaster relief North Carolina Emergency Management
  10. 10. NFIP RegulationsCommunities must adopt & enforce ordinances that meet or exceed NFIP criteriaNFIP criteria ensures that new buildings will be protected from flood levels shown on digital FIRMOver time, stock of pre-FIRM buildings should be replaced with post-FIRM buildings & risk to flooding reduced North Carolina Emergency Management
  11. 11. Definition: FloodA “flood” is defined by the NFIP as “a temporarycondition of partial or complete inundation ofnormally dry land areas from:Overflow of inland or tidal waters orUnusual or rapid accumulation or runoff of surfacewaters from any source” North Carolina Emergency Management
  12. 12. Definition: FloodplainAny land area susceptible to inundation by water from any source Floodplain North Carolina Emergency Management
  13. 13. Flood Zone Designations North Carolina Emergency Management
  14. 14. Flood Zone Designations Shaded X is a.k.a. 500-year storm event North Carolina Emergency Management
  15. 15. Hurricane Irene, Aurora, NC North Carolina Emergency Management
  16. 16. Example: Elevated Modular Home North Carolina Emergency Management
  17. 17. Biloxi, MS, April 1, 2006 - Beauvoir, the National Historic Landmark home of Jefferson Davis, is one of very few woodenhomes still standing in the coastal Mississippi area after Hurricane Katrina. North Carolina Emergency Management
  18. 18. Biloxi, Miss., August 19, 2010 - Construction is complete on the Jefferson Davis Home. The house was heavily damaged byHurricane Katrina in 2005. FEMA provided grants for the project. North Carolina Emergency Management
  19. 19. After Hurricane Katrina North Carolina Emergency Management
  20. 20. After Elevation & Restoration North Carolina Emergency Management
  21. 21. Elevation Certificate North Carolina Emergency Management
  22. 22. Newest Elevation CertificateNew version of the Elevation Certificate (EC) effective August 1, 2013 – July 31, 2015.Available for download (in both PDF & MS Word format) from FEMA’s website at:http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=1383 North Carolina Emergency Management
  23. 23. Elevation Certificate Form  Verify Regulatory compliance  Flood Insurance Policy Rating  Support of applications for map revisions & amendments NOTE: Data collected on this form is for the construction & utility service to a single STRUCTURE only – not the lot or other improvements. North Carolina Emergency Management
  24. 24. The Community’s EC ReviewCommunity Officials must review EC’s before accepting them.This ensures:  Completeness  Reasonableness/Accuracy  ComplianceIf a problem is found, return to the professional for correction.Structure will be in violation until proper Finished ConstructionElevation Certificate is provided. North Carolina Emergency Management
  25. 25. Section A (no changes) North Carolina Emergency Management
  26. 26. Sections A1-A3 Complete all items, except “For Insurance Company Use”. A1. Building Owner’s(s’) Name(s) A2. Building Address - 911 address of building location. A3. The address is a rural route, enter the lot & block numbers, the tax parcel number, the legal description. North Carolina Emergency Management
  27. 27. Section A4 A4. Building Use - residential, non-residential, an addition to an existing residential or non-residential building, an accessory building (e.g., garage), or other type of structure. Use the Comments area on page 2 or attach additional comments, as needed. North Carolina Emergency Management
  28. 28. Section A5 Latitude/Longitude taken at the center of the front of the building. Decimal degrees: provide coordinates to at least 4 decimal places (e.g., 39.5043°, -110.7585°). Coordinates must be accurate within 66 feet. Provide the type of datum used - FEMA prefers the use of NAD 1983. North Carolina Emergency Management
  29. 29. Sections A6 (a change) A6. Attach photographs showing at least the front & rear of the building. Must be in color & measure at least 3”x3”. If split-level or multi-level, side views are also required. **When applicable photographs must show the foundation with representative examples of the flood openings or vents. ** North Carolina Emergency Management
  30. 30. Sections A7 (no changes) A7. Enter the building diagram number that best represents the building. There are 10 building diagrams. Use the Comments area on page 2 or attach additional comments, as needed. North Carolina Emergency Management
  31. 31. Building Diagram 1A North Carolina Emergency Management
  32. 32. Building Diagram 1B North Carolina Emergency Management
  33. 33. Building Diagram 2 North Carolina Emergency Management
  34. 34. Building Diagram 3 North Carolina Emergency Management
  35. 35. Building Diagram 4 North Carolina Emergency Management
  36. 36. Building Diagram 5 North Carolina Emergency Management
  37. 37. Building Diagram 6 North Carolina Emergency Management
  38. 38. Building Diagram 7 North Carolina Emergency Management
  39. 39. Building Diagram 8 North Carolina Emergency Management
  40. 40. Building Diagram 9 North Carolina Emergency Management
  41. 41. Section A8a-bFor buildings with a crawlspace or enclosure(s):A8.a. Square footage of crawlspace or enclosure(s). Takemeasurements from the outside.A8.b. Number of permanent flood openings in the crawlspaceor enclosure(s) that are no higher than 1.0 foot above the higherof the exterior or interior grade or floor immediately below theopening North Carolina Emergency Management
  42. 42. Section A8c A8.c. Calculate the total net area of all such permanent flood openings in square inches, excluding any bars, louvers, or other covers of the permanent flood openings. If the net area cannot be calculated, provide the size of the flood openings without consideration of any covers & indicate in the Comments area the type of cover that exists in the flood openings. North Carolina Emergency Management
  43. 43. Section A8d A8.d. Engineered flood openings. Attach a copy of the Individual Engineered Flood Openings Certification or an Evaluation Report issued by the International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC ES), if you have it.If the crawlspace or enclosure(s) have no permanent flood openings,or if the openings are not within 1.0 foot above adjacent grade, enter “0” (zero) in Items A8.b-c.FEMA Technical Bulletin 1: “Openings in Foundation Walls & Walls of Enclosures” North Carolina Emergency Management
  44. 44. Standards for Elevation on Perimeter Wall Foundations In Zones A & AE, fully enclosed areas below the lowest floor shall be designed to automatically equalize hydrostatic flood forces on walls by allowing for the entry & exit of floodwaters To meet this requirement, the openings must be:  certified by a registered engineer or architect, OR  meet or exceed the minimum opening requirements North Carolina Emergency Management
  45. 45. Hydrostatic Openings Permanent Opening in a Wall that Allowsthe Free Passage of Water in Both Directions, AUTOMATICALLY, without Human Intervention.A Window, a Door, or a Garage Door is NOT Considered an Opening. North Carolina Emergency Management
  46. 46. Minimum Requirements for Foundation Openings Minimum of two openings on different sides of each enclosed area. The total net area of all openings must be at least one (1) square inch for each square foot of enclosed area. The bottom of all required openings shall be no higher than one foot above the adjacent grade at each opening. Openings may be equipped with screens, louvers, or other “automatic” coverings or devices, provided they permit the automatic flow of floodwaters in both directions. North Carolina Emergency Management
  47. 47. Net area? North Carolina Emergency Management
  48. 48. 1 foot?North Carolina Emergency Management
  49. 49. This is < 1 footNorth Carolina Emergency Management
  50. 50. This is compliant North Carolina Emergency Management
  51. 51. Plexiglas cover.North Carolina Emergency Management This is a violation!!
  52. 52. Spray foam insulation. Emergency Management North Carolina This is a violation!!
  53. 53. Engineered Openings/Vents North Carolina Emergency Management
  54. 54. Section A9 (no changes) Same as Section A8, but for garage when the garage is attached to the building. Use the Comments area on page 2 or attach additional comments, as needed. North Carolina Emergency Management
  55. 55. Sections B1-B9 (no changes) B1. Enter name of Community which has permitting jurisdiction. B4. Enter the 10 digit panel number. B5. Enter the panel suffix (letter following panel number). B6. Enter the date from the FIRM Index Panel. B7. Enter the FIRM panel effective date. B8. Enter the Flood Zone(s) related to the structure. B9. Enter the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) for the structure to the nearest tenth of a foot . North Carolina Emergency Management
  56. 56. Section B1-9 Complete the Elevation Certificate on the basis of the FIRM in effect at the time of the certification. Additional &/or preliminary data may be provided in Comments Section. North Carolina Emergency Management
  57. 57. Title Block Community names & CID numbers FIRM Panel Effective Date 10-digit Map Number (based on state plane coordinates) & Suffix (letter)North Carolina Emergency Management
  58. 58. Sections B10-B12 B10. Check the box for source of BFE data. These are listed in the order of preference. If the flooding source is riverine, the “FIS Profile” box should be selected. B11. Check the box for elevation datum used in Item B9. NC maps currently use NAVD 1988. B12. Indicate whether or not the building is located in a Coastal Barrier Resource System (CRBS) or Otherwise Protected Area (OPA). Enter the designation date & check “CBRS” or “OPA”. North Carolina Emergency Management
  59. 59. Coastal Barrier Resource System OPA CBRS 11/16/1991 10/01/1983 North Carolina Emergency Management
  60. 60. Section CNorth Carolina Emergency Management
  61. 61. Section C1 Item C1. The elevations to be entered in this section are based on construction drawings, a building under construction, or finished construction. Use the Comments area of Section D as needed. “Finished Construction” is only when all machinery &/or equipment (furnaces, hot water heaters, heat pumps, air conditioners, elevators & their associated equipment) have been installed & the grading around the building is completed. North Carolina Emergency Management
  62. 62. Section C2 Enter the Benchmark Utilized. Provide the PID or other unique identifier assigned by the maintainer of the benchmark. For GPS survey, indicate the benchmark used for the base station, the Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) sites used for an On-line Positioning User Service (OPUS) solution (attach the OPUS report), or the name of the Real Time Network used. Note the Vertical Datum. All elevations for the certificate must use the same datum on which the BFE is based. North Carolina Emergency Management
  63. 63. Section C2.a-d Items C2.a-c. Enter the building elevations (excluding the attached garage) indicated by the selected building diagram (Item A7). If there is an attached garage, enter the elevation for top of attached garage slab in Item C2.d. If any item does not apply to the building, enter “N/A” for not applicable. North Carolina Emergency Management
  64. 64. Section C2.a-d A field survey is required for Items C2.a-h. For buildings in A zones:  Elevations should be measured at the top of the floor. For buildings in V zones:  Elevation must be measured at the bottom of the lowest horizontal structural member . For buildings elevated on a crawlspace enter the elevation of the top of the crawlspace floor in Item C2.a. North Carolina Emergency Management
  65. 65. North Carolina Emergency Management
  66. 66. Lowest Floor in ZONE A, AEThe lowest floor C2bis measured atthe top of thesub-floor, slabor grade for A8regulatory & C2aflood insurancepurposes EC References to BOTTOM Floor North Carolina Emergency Management
  67. 67. Lowest Floor in ZONE V & VE C2aBottom of thelowest horizontal EC References to BOTTOM Floorstructuralmember C2csupporting the C2a*lowest floor *If solid enclosure below BFE as in Diagram 6 North Carolina Emergency Management
  68. 68. Section C2.e Enter the lowest platform elevation of the machinery & equipment. The elevation(s) for machinery & equipment are required in order to rate the building for flood insurance. Local officials are required to ensure that all machinery & equipment servicing the building are protected from flooding, including ductwork, be documented on the Elevation Certificate. If the machinery or equipment is mounted to a wall, pile, etc., indicate machinery/equipment type & its location (on floor inside garage, on platform affixed to exterior wall, etc.) in the Comments area. North Carolina Emergency Management
  69. 69. North Carolina Emergency Management
  70. 70. North Carolina Emergency Management
  71. 71. High WaterMark North Carolina Emergency Management
  72. 72. Anchored Propane Tank Properly anchored North Carolina Emergency Management
  73. 73. Section C2.f-h Item C2.f. Enter the lowest elevation of the ground, sidewalk, or patio slab immediately next to the building. Item C2.g. Enter the highest elevation of the ground, sidewalk, or patio slab immediately next to the building. Item C2.h. Enter the lowest grade elevation at the deck support, or stairs. These measurements must be to the nearest tenth of a foot. North Carolina Emergency Management
  74. 74. Section D (change)Original Signature & Seal are required North Carolina Emergency Management
  75. 75. Section DUse the Comments section for as needed clarifications, explanations, etc. . North Carolina Emergency Management
  76. 76. Photographs (change)At least 2 color photographs, 3” x 3” North Carolina Emergency Management
  77. 77. Quick EC Review Form completed by a NC surveyor Surveyor/Engineer is providing data points Community Officials & Flood Insurance Agents must determine compliance details The locations of elevations such as BFE, HAG & LAG are determined by building type Color photos (2 minimum), & must show the foundation with representative examples of the flood openings or vents North Carolina Emergency Management
  78. 78. NC North Carolina Emergency Management
  79. 79. North Carolina Emergency Management
  80. 80. Hurricane Irene, Aurora, NC North Carolina Emergency Management
  81. 81. Bolivar Peninsula, TX 10/15/08 Hurricane Ike 20 ft. storm surge North Carolina Emergency Management
  82. 82. Gilchrist, TX 8/16/09 Hurricane Ike, 20 ft. storm surge;Town of Gilchrist destroyed; only the stilt homes survived North Carolina Emergency Management
  83. 83. Hurricane Sandy – Sea Bright NJ North Carolina Emergency Management
  84. 84. Hurricane Sandy – Mantoloking NJ North Carolina Emergency Management
  85. 85. Hurricane Sandy - Union Beach NJ North Carolina Emergency Management
  86. 86. Hurricane Sandy – Union Beach NJ North Carolina Emergency Management
  87. 87. Resources Resources: Flood Insurance Rate Maps www.ncfloodmaps.com www.msc.fema.gov Flood Insurance www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program www.floodsmart.gov CRSwww.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program/community-rating-system North Carolina Emergency Management
  88. 88. Contact InformationNC Geospatial & TechnologyManagement OfficeFloodplain Mapping Programwww.ncfloodmaps.comJohn Gerber, P.E., CFMState NFIP Coordinator Maureen O’Shea, AICP, CFM(919) 825-2317 NFIP PlannerJohn.Gerber@ncdps.gov (252) 565-3206 Maureen.OShea@ncdps.govRandy Mundt, AICP, CFMCommunity Development Planner III(919) 825-2339Randy.Mundt@ncdps.gov Federal Emergency Management Agency 1-877-FEMA-MAP http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/fmc_main.shtm North Carolina Emergency Management
  89. 89. Questions?Thank You!North Carolina Emergency Management
  90. 90. New Tool forFlood & Hazard Planning Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) Wilmington Regional Association of Realtors March 13, 2013 North Carolina Emergency Management
  91. 91. Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) North Carolina Emergency Management
  92. 92. Older Map versus Digital MapDotey’s Branch in Jacksonville, NC North Carolina Emergency Management
  93. 93. Digital Map2009 NC Statewide DFIRM Panel North Carolina Emergency Management
  94. 94. Ingredients of a DFIRM +Base Map Topography North Carolina Emergency Management
  95. 95. Building Footprints LayerReason for Development:To know what portion of the structure is in a flood zone  (e.g.: all in, all out, or partially in),To provide expanded potential for additional hazardassessments. North Carolina Emergency Management
  96. 96. North Carolina Emergency Management
  97. 97. FRIS DFIRM Map Symbology North Carolina Emergency Management
  98. 98. FRIS DFIRM Display North Carolina Emergency Management
  99. 99. FRIS Display View/Print/Map Export North Carolina Emergency Management
  100. 100. FRIS Preliminary DFIRM North Carolina Emergency Management
  101. 101. Coming Attraction: Updated Hazard DataNCFMP is currently fundedto update 50 counties withnew / updated models.All coastal counties willreceive updated modelsthat include new stormsurge Still waterinformation.Onslow Co. & Pender Co. ~ 1/2014 North Carolina Emergency Management
  102. 102. Integrated Hazard Risk Management (iRisk) North Carolina Emergency Management
  103. 103. IHRM Scope: Hazard Identification Identifies & displays all natural hazards at different magnitude levels / annual frequency on the parcel, statewide, & national level for: Riverine flooding Coastal erosion Dam failure Landslides Levee failure Earthquakes Coastal flooding Wind (straight line/hurricane) Storm surge from hurricanes Tornadoes Coastal erosion Wildfire Landslides Snow/Ice, Hail Earthquakes Drought Sea Level Rise North Carolina Emergency Management
  104. 104. Current & Intended Uses Vulnerability & Hazard Risk Identification Loss Estimation Assistance with Recovery Operations Enhancements to Floodplain Mapping North Carolina Emergency Management
  105. 105. FRIS Vulnerability/Risk Information North Carolina Emergency Management
  106. 106. FRIS Financial Vulnerability/Risk North Carolina Emergency Management
  107. 107. FRIS Reduce My Risk North Carolina Emergency Management
  108. 108. FRIS Produce a FIRMETTE North Carolina Emergency Management
  109. 109. 10 Minute BreakNC Floodplain Mapping Contacts: John Gerber, PE, CFM State NFIP Coordinator (919) 825-2317 John.Gerber@ncdps.gov Randy Mundt, AICP, CFMCommunity Development Planner III (919) 825-2339 Randy.Mundt@ncdps.gov Maureen O’Shea, AICP, CFM NFIP Planner (252) 565-3206 Maureen.OShea@ncdps.govNorth Carolina Emergency Management

×