Prague day-1-test

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  • In short: Using video to change practices, policies & laws. (Rose
  • What Video Advocacy is NOT…An effective tool on its own. Must be part of broader advocacy strategy and other hr methodologies. Video simply as a communications, fundraising or PR tool. Rather an advocacy tool to promote changes in human rights policy or practice.Just for professionals. You can use their help, but the understanding and intent should come from hr activists for use in advocacy as you are rooted in this. Also possibilities of access and long-term understanding of activists.Not just about strong graphic imagery. Most WITNESS partners’ work is testimony-based.Not for every human rights issues. Like all approaches, has strengths and weaknesses.
  • Brainstorm the strengths and shortcomings of video. What kind of stories is it good at telling? What kind of images is it best for capturing? What aspects of the process of creating a video for advocacy are strengths? What are potential or actual shortcomings or limitations?ADVANTAGESPersonal testimony (eye contact)“Put a face on it”: Voices of those directly affected can be brought to locations that our otherwise inaccessible (eg. refugees, marginalized people); truth-telling senseDirect evidence of a violation (seeing is believing; ‘indisputable’)‘Presencing’ direct neglect or inaction of authorities (recording inaction of police/local officials, and holding accountable to higher authorities)Emotional/visceral impact encouraging to action - flip side is mis-use in propaganda; depends on integrity of filmmaker/activistAudience is less literate in editing; tends to place trust in television and be less questioning of how put together; opportunity to abuse trust depends on integrity of makerPowerful at illustrating contrasts (between places/and over time – eg IDP settlements in Burma?)Depends on compression (linked to contrast)Make links of individual stories and systemic issues; emblematic cases of wider problems.Storytelling potential – including power of positive envisioning, particularly relevant in ESC/other rights where fulfillment can seem distantCan create space for actionGood for case-study approach and for violations-based cases where documenting individual stories; not good for quantitative analysis. Accessible to most – does not require literacy, and potential to share information, and engage viewers in debates (cf. Lessons from participatory development communication). Particularly relevant if we are talking about empowering groups themselves in a struggle. Not all audiences are external.Process and product can be representative of marginalized groupsThrough good visual and verbal storytelling can emphasize indivisibility of rights – someone can talk about how they were denied justice at police station; shots of them at home in poverty can dramatically and in an unspoken manner highlight a whyCan simplify and clarify issuesPROCESSCan be strongly participatory – visual medium, easy-to-use technology, easy to share material and discussEmpowering to users (easy to learn how to do)Can film where difficult to get access (undercover RAWA, trafficking)Requires planningPotential deterrent to abuses occurring as recording eventsLIMITATIONSNot good for abstract conceptsCan reduce complex structural issues to personal stories and lose the bigger pictureAudience can be too trusting. Potential risk to people involved in filming and distributionEditing process can be non-participatoryCan intrude into privacy; need to take extra care with consent and securityCan be a shield or a targetPROCESS: Hand out Powerpoint slides
  • These are some key elements to our approach which are also key concerns that are relevant to any hr worker using video:We empower local human rights activists and concerned citizens within affected communities; not just video professionals. Video originates in the advocacy and is embedded in it throughoutVideo is a tool alongside other campaign elements. Since you’re using video as part of a campaign its not necessarily about reaching the most people, its about reaching the right people – seven members of a review body, 15 members of a government committee, key shareholders in a business, 100 youth organizers, 2000 online solidarity supporters of your cause. And its about reaching them at the right time. The video advocacy starts with the objective and audience, not the issue or story.We know that with there is growing saturation of images and stories of despair – so we need to also include concrete solutions, and a clear space for action by the audience. And we need to convey the direct ‘asks’ of the beneficiaries of the advocacy in a way that visual media makes possible. Storytelling is key and its not just about visual imagery of horror.Finally, safety, security and ethics are critical I’m going to mention a couple of examples of real impact using video to mobilize and to target key audiences – one that draw more on targeted advocacy screenings to highlight a human rights situation, bring voices from the ground to policymakers and push for specific action
  • These are some key elements to our approach which are also key concerns that are relevant to any hr worker using video:We empower local human rights activists and concerned citizens within affected communities; not just video professionals. Video originates in the advocacy and is embedded in it throughoutVideo is a tool alongside other campaign elements. Since you’re using video as part of a campaign its not necessarily about reaching the most people, its about reaching the right people – seven members of a review body, 15 members of a government committee, key shareholders in a business, 100 youth organizers, 2000 online solidarity supporters of your cause. And its about reaching them at the right time. The video advocacy starts with the objective and audience, not the issue or story.We know that with there is growing saturation of images and stories of despair – so we need to also include concrete solutions, and a clear space for action by the audience. And we need to convey the direct ‘asks’ of the beneficiaries of the advocacy in a way that visual media makes possible. Storytelling is key and its not just about visual imagery of horror.Finally, safety, security and ethics are critical I’m going to mention a couple of examples of real impact using video to mobilize and to target key audiences – one that draw more on targeted advocacy screenings to highlight a human rights situation, bring voices from the ground to policymakers and push for specific action
  • Another example is from my colleague - Bukeni’s work - in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where he worked to bring the experiences of child soldiers to parents and communities in the eastern DRC to convince thousands not to let their children be voluntarily recruited into militia – and then subsequently also shared their perspectives and calls for action with decision-makers at the ICC to encourage prioritization of these issues in the prosecutions. The key elements again for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.*NOTE if time: Less directed asks; more pulling audiences into discussion of first community-oriented video-More directed asks of second video making specific calls for action to audience of decision-makers
  • Another example is from my colleague - Bukeni’s work - in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where he worked to bring the experiences of child soldiers to parents and communities in the eastern DRC to convince thousands not to let their children be voluntarily recruited into militia – and then subsequently also shared their perspectives and calls for action with decision-makers at the ICC to encourage prioritization of these issues in the prosecutions. The key elements again for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.*NOTE if time: Less directed asks; more pulling audiences into discussion of first community-oriented video-More directed asks of second video making specific calls for action to audience of decision-makers
  • Another example is from my colleague - Bukeni’s work - in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where he worked to bring the experiences of child soldiers to parents and communities in the eastern DRC to convince thousands not to let their children be voluntarily recruited into militia – and then subsequently also shared their perspectives and calls for action with decision-makers at the ICC to encourage prioritization of these issues in the prosecutions. The key elements again for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.*NOTE if time: Less directed asks; more pulling audiences into discussion of first community-oriented video-More directed asks of second video making specific calls for action to audience of decision-makers
  • Another example is from my colleague - Bukeni’s work - in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where he worked to bring the experiences of child soldiers to parents and communities in the eastern DRC to convince thousands not to let their children be voluntarily recruited into militia – and then subsequently also shared their perspectives and calls for action with decision-makers at the ICC to encourage prioritization of these issues in the prosecutions. The key elements again for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.*NOTE if time: Less directed asks; more pulling audiences into discussion of first community-oriented video-More directed asks of second video making specific calls for action to audience of decision-makers
  • Itgestbetter.org
  • http://globalvoicesonline.org/2011/02/03/egypt-clashes-on-video/
  • In Brazil we partnered with the Pastoral Land Commission to highlight the continuing problem of rural slave labor – over 25,000 people a year involved in forced labor under degrading conditions.Here key is bringing the voice of victims and survivors and the visual evidence of their situation directly into the spaces where decisions are made. The video highlights the voices of ex-slave and current slave laborers, but also their direct requests for action, and frames those voices in terms of policy solutions.‘Bound by Promises’ has been used in many different decision-maker venues, and particularly in screenings to state and national authorities to help convince them to reinstate the mobile inspection squads that monitor these abuses.The key elements for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.
  • In Brazil we partnered with the Pastoral Land Commission to highlight the continuing problem of rural slave labor – over 25,000 people a year involved in forced labor under degrading conditions.Here key is bringing the voice of victims and survivors and the visual evidence of their situation directly into the spaces where decisions are made. The video highlights the voices of ex-slave and current slave laborers, but also their direct requests for action, and frames those voices in terms of policy solutions.‘Bound by Promises’ has been used in many different decision-maker venues, and particularly in screenings to state and national authorities to help convince them to reinstate the mobile inspection squads that monitor these abuses.The key elements for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.
  • In Brazil we partnered with the Pastoral Land Commission to highlight the continuing problem of rural slave labor – over 25,000 people a year involved in forced labor under degrading conditions.Here key is bringing the voice of victims and survivors and the visual evidence of their situation directly into the spaces where decisions are made. The video highlights the voices of ex-slave and current slave laborers, but also their direct requests for action, and frames those voices in terms of policy solutions.‘Bound by Promises’ has been used in many different decision-maker venues, and particularly in screenings to state and national authorities to help convince them to reinstate the mobile inspection squads that monitor these abuses.The key elements for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.
  • In Brazil we partnered with the Pastoral Land Commission to highlight the continuing problem of rural slave labor – over 25,000 people a year involved in forced labor under degrading conditions.Here key is bringing the voice of victims and survivors and the visual evidence of their situation directly into the spaces where decisions are made. The video highlights the voices of ex-slave and current slave laborers, but also their direct requests for action, and frames those voices in terms of policy solutions.‘Bound by Promises’ has been used in many different decision-maker venues, and particularly in screenings to state and national authorities to help convince them to reinstate the mobile inspection squads that monitor these abuses.The key elements for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.
  • Another example is from my colleague - Bukeni’s work - in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where he worked to bring the experiences of child soldiers to parents and communities in the eastern DRC to convince thousands not to let their children be voluntarily recruited into militia – and then subsequently also shared their perspectives and calls for action with decision-makers at the ICC to encourage prioritization of these issues in the prosecutions. The key elements again for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.*NOTE if time: Less directed asks; more pulling audiences into discussion of first community-oriented video-More directed asks of second video making specific calls for action to audience of decision-makers
  • Another example is from my colleague - Bukeni’s work - in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where he worked to bring the experiences of child soldiers to parents and communities in the eastern DRC to convince thousands not to let their children be voluntarily recruited into militia – and then subsequently also shared their perspectives and calls for action with decision-makers at the ICC to encourage prioritization of these issues in the prosecutions. The key elements again for the video advocacy here: Start with an objective, and an identified audience; Then draw on the storytelling and narrative power of video, its capacity to put the ‘human’ in human rights and to place testimony and survivor experience in spaces of power, to propose specific solutions and engage the audience both emotionally and analytically. And finally place the video in front of the target audience in an appropriate setting and with very specific timing.*NOTE if time: Less directed asks; more pulling audiences into discussion of first community-oriented video-More directed asks of second video making specific calls for action to audience of decision-makers
  • Follow up training—in dependently producing evidentiary video. Goal = implementation of Protocol on Gender and Development, and that SADC forces Zim to implement the Global Political Agreement. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) is an inter-governmental organization headquartered in Gaborone, Botswana. Its goal is to further socio-economic cooperation and integration as well as political and security cooperation among 15 southern African states. It complements the role of the African Union.Protocol (2008) = regional instrument for advancing gender equality and women's rights. GPA = Power sharing agreement struck between ZANU-PF and MDC after the 2008 runoff elections(Rose)
  • Brainstorm the strengths and shortcomings of video. What kind of stories is it good at telling? What kind of images is it best for capturing? What aspects of the process of creating a video for advocacy are strengths? What are potential or actual shortcomings or limitations?ADVANTAGESPersonal testimony (eye contact)“Put a face on it”: Voices of those directly affected can be brought to locations that our otherwise inaccessible (eg. refugees, marginalized people); truth-telling senseDirect evidence of a violation (seeing is believing; ‘indisputable’)‘Presencing’ direct neglect or inaction of authorities (recording inaction of police/local officials, and holding accountable to higher authorities)Emotional/visceral impact encouraging to action - flip side is mis-use in propaganda; depends on integrity of filmmaker/activistAudience is less literate in editing; tends to place trust in television and be less questioning of how put together; opportunity to abuse trust depends on integrity of makerPowerful at illustrating contrasts (between places/and over time – eg IDP settlements in Burma?)Depends on compression (linked to contrast)Make links of individual stories and systemic issues; emblematic cases of wider problems.Storytelling potential – including power of positive envisioning, particularly relevant in ESC/other rights where fulfillment can seem distantCan create space for actionGood for case-study approach and for violations-based cases where documenting individual stories; not good for quantitative analysis. Accessible to most – does not require literacy, and potential to share information, and engage viewers in debates (cf. Lessons from participatory development communication). Particularly relevant if we are talking about empowering groups themselves in a struggle. Not all audiences are external.Process and product can be representative of marginalized groupsThrough good visual and verbal storytelling can emphasize indivisibility of rights – someone can talk about how they were denied justice at police station; shots of them at home in poverty can dramatically and in an unspoken manner highlight a whyCan simplify and clarify issuesPROCESSCan be strongly participatory – visual medium, easy-to-use technology, easy to share material and discussEmpowering to users (easy to learn how to do)Can film where difficult to get access (undercover RAWA, trafficking)Requires planningPotential deterrent to abuses occurring as recording eventsLIMITATIONSNot good for abstract conceptsCan reduce complex structural issues to personal stories and lose the bigger pictureAudience can be too trusting. Potential risk to people involved in filming and distributionEditing process can be non-participatoryCan intrude into privacy; need to take extra care with consent and securityCan be a shield or a targetPROCESS: Hand out Powerpoint slides
  • Prague day-1-test

    1. 1. WITNESS uses video to open the eyes of the world <br />to human rights violations<br />Making Your Video Advocacy Successful <br />March 7-10, 2011<br />Chris Michael, WITNESS <br />Video Advocacy Training Manager<br />
    2. 2. WHO ARE WE? <br />Name<br />Where you live<br />Why you’re here<br />Experience with video for advocacy <br />Demonstrate your favorite facial expression <br />
    3. 3. WHAT ARE WE DOING?<br />Learn WITNESS’ Video Advocacy Methodology <br />Review (successful) case studies<br />Ensure you leave with a Video Action Plan<br />Practice filming best practices<br />Develop safety, security and informed consent best practices<br />What else? <br />
    4. 4. DAY 1<br />Review our experience of effective video advocacy<br />Explore strengths and limitations of video <br />Look at methodologies for using video for change<br />Introduce the Video Action Plan<br />Filming exercise<br />
    5. 5. DAY 2<br />Video advocacy case study review<br />Storytelling discussion and exercises<br />Start developing your Video Action Plan <br />Introduce safety, security and consent <br />Filming exercises <br />
    6. 6. DAY 3<br />Explore innovative uses of video for change <br />Overview of editing and tips to film like an editor <br />Finalize* your video action plan & share it<br />
    7. 7. WITNESS: VIDEO FOR CHANGE<br />19years<br />75countries<br />250partner organizations<br />1000’s of human rights defenders<br />4000hours of archived human rights footage<br />
    8. 8. HARNESSING TECHNOLOGY FOR HUMAN RIGHTS<br />EQUIPPING<br /> cameras & tools<br />EMPOWERING<br /> training human rights defenders<br />ENABLING<br /> growing P2P networks<br />
    9. 9. TRAJECTORY OF VIDEO<br />
    10. 10. THE GAME CHANGER…<br />
    11. 11. TOOLS FOR A REASON<br />JUST BECAUSE YOU CAN, DOESN’T MEAN YOU SHOULD. <br />- My (most incredible) mom<br />Tactics that optimally support the advocacy.<br />Tools that optimally support the tactic.<br />All should both build and harness power - and be integrated. <br />
    12. 12. VIDEO ADVOCACY<br /> Video advocacy is about effectively using the power of stories, visual evidence and personal testimony as part of a human rights advocacy strategy to engage people to act and create change in human rights law, policy, practice and behavior. <br />
    13. 13. EXERCISE <br /> In a group of three-four persons, share an experience of video being used for human rights advocacy.<br />Discuss together in the small group what made it effective.<br /> After ten minutes, we’ll hear a sample of the examples.<br />
    14. 14. WITNESS’ TOP 5<br />Video made for a reason, not about something<br />Video made for a specific audience <br />Video with a clear and doable request for action from the audience<br />Video with a strong message and the best messengers to move the audience to action<br />Video that can, and will, be seen by the audience<br />
    15. 15. FOR WITNESS, VA IS NOT…<br />A substitute for other advocacy tools: reports, mobiles, lobbying, etc.<br />Used primarily as a publicity, educational or training tool<br />Just for professional filmmakers or journalists or media experts<br />Necessarily dependent on strong graphic imagery for impact<br />3/7/11<br />14<br />
    16. 16. EXERCISE <br /> In a group of three-four persons, use the example of the film and your own experience to discuss the strengths and limitations of video being used for human rights advocacy.<br />Note your ideas on post-its using no more than 4-5 words – try to identify 3-4 advantages and 3-4 limitations<br /> After ten minutes, we’ll gather the post-its on the wall and see what groupings emerge<br />
    17. 17. STRENGTHS<br />Show or contextualize a violation or its aftermath<br />2) Put a face on human rights advocacy by telling a personal story <br />3) Compress, contrast and juxtapose situations<br />4) Use emotional power to communicate to an audience<br />5) Detail specific cases or incidents that are emblematic of patterns<br />6) Be a democratic and participatory medium<br />7) Serve as a shield<br />LIMITATIONS/SHORTCOMINGS<br />1) Depends on access to places and people<br />2) Limitations in covering structural issues<br />3) Weak for deep quantitative analysis and complex procedural issues<br />4) Technological divide still exists and does not change/remove issues of representation, and process can be less participatory during editing<br />5) Can jeopardize lives<br /> Advocacy and Propaganda?<br />3/7/11<br />16<br />
    18. 18. BREAK…<br />
    19. 19. WITNESS: Methodology<br />Start with the Advocacy Objective<br /> Focus on Audiences<br /> Solutions and a Space for Action<br /> Safety and Security<br />
    20. 20. Landmarks of a Video Advocacy Campaign<br />Safety, Security & Consent<br />Advocacy Goal<br /> Target Audiences<br /> Message<br /> Story<br /> Distribution<br /> Archive<br /> Impact Evaluation<br />
    21. 21. Location/Partner: Paraguay, Mental Disability Rights International<br />Objective: Secure precautionary measures to protect two named individuals; and push for long-term reform with community-based model<br />Audience: Inter-American Commission for Human Rights, footage sequenced for mass media usage<br />
    22. 22. Advocacy Objective<br /> Audience<br /> Message <br />Contextualize in/or Create Narratives with Action Opportunities<br />Circulation, Distribution and Viewing Approach<br />Evaluate<br />Participation/Safety<br />
    23. 23. Objective<br /> Audience<br /> Message<br />Contextualize in/or Create Narratives with Action Opportunities<br />Circulation, Distribution and Viewing Approach<br />Evaluate<br />Location/Partner: Paraguay, Mental Disability Rights International<br />Objective: Secure precautionary measures to protect two named individuals; and push for long-term reform with community-based model<br />Audience: Inter-American Commission for Human Rights<br />Participation/Safety<br /> /<br />Message: Abuses in this facility are breaches of international law, and require immediate action<br />Story: Told via the emblematic stories of two minors, framed by international law<br />Timing/Distribution: For usage before Commission; and footage to be used in news coverage of decision<br />Impact: Presidential action to secure improved conditions for named minors; reform of the psychiatric system<br />
    24. 24. Location/Partner: Croatia<br />Association for Promoting Inclusion (API)<br />Objective:To raise awareness about the rights of people with intellectual disabilities; secure officials’ commitment to social inclusion and establishment of community-based social care programs.<br />Audience: Health care, social services, elected officials -> UN<br />Objective<br /> Audience<br /> Message<br />Contextualize in/or Create Narratives with Action Opportunities<br />Circulation, Distribution and Viewing Approach<br />Evaluate<br />Participation/Safety<br /> /<br />
    25. 25. Location/Partner: Croatia<br />Association for Promoting Inclusion (API)<br />Objective:To raise awareness about the rights of people with intellectual disabilities; secure officials’ commitment to social inclusion and establishment of community-based social care programs.<br />Audience: Health care, social services, elected officials -> UN<br />Message: Over institutionalizing persons with intellectual disabilities; challenging stereotypes; policy change is needed<br />Story: Told via the emblematic stories of two lovers, framed by rights<br />Timing/Distribution: Key decision makers; direct service providers; UN <br />Impact: Croatia one of first 5 nations to sign UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities<br />Objective<br /> Audience<br /> Message<br />Contextualize in/or Create Narratives with Action Opportunities<br />Circulation, Distribution and Viewing Approach<br />Evaluate<br />Participation/Safety<br /> /<br />
    26. 26. STEP 1: SMART OBJECTIVES<br />Establish the purpose of the video within broader advocacy strategy<br />Set clear and specific objectives for the video, specifying what they are, and how they can be achieved<br />
    27. 27. SMART Objectives<br />Specific<br />Measurable<br />Achievable<br />Realistic<br />Time-bound<br />
    28. 28. NOT Specific: Empower students to do environmental accountability research in Brazil<br />Specific: Provide technological support to Brazilian film students to help document corporate violations of environmental laws in south and southeast Brazil and place this evidence before national stakeholders including …<br />NOT Measurable: The video screening should evoke more uplifting responses from the public.<br />Measurable: The video screening will secure a 15% increase in participation in local community dialogue in this location over the next six months.<br />NOT Achievable: The video will make officials act to push for ratification of the Kyoto Protocol.<br />Achievable: During our advocacy briefing, we will provide a video report with accompanying recommendations for interim steps to support the upcoming legislative debate on ratification.<br />NOT Realistic: Attendance at our video events will quadruple last year’s attendance.<br />Realistic: We should aim for a 5% increase in attendance for this year’s video event while maintaining our routine efforts.<br />NOT Time-bound: We hope the anti-discrimination law passes as soon as possible.<br />Time-bound: We aim to have the anti-discrimination law passed by August 1st, 2009.<br />
    29. 29. STEP 2: TARGET AUDIENCES<br />Who has an influence on your advocacy goal? Who should be reached and persuaded? <br />What is their perspective or attitude to the issue?<br />What is their level of awareness?<br />What is their level of knowledge?<br />Who are your secondary audiences who can pressure your primary audience?<br />
    30. 30. <ul><li>Evidentiary
    31. 31. Decision-maker lobbying
    32. 32. Interventions in formal HR monitoring
    33. 33. Community organizing – offline and online
    34. 34. Solidarity organizing – online and offline
    35. 35. Mass mobilization
    36. 36. ‘Mass’ media attention</li></ul>.<br />
    37. 37. STEP 3: STRATEGIC MESSAGES<br />Resonate & Compel<br />What are the 1-5 key facts / sentences / points that will resonate with your audience and thus must be in your documentary?<br />
    38. 38. KEY QUESTIONS<br />What is the message you need to get to this audience?<br />Are you educating, engaging or activating?<br />What story will be persuasive, compelling or motivating for this audience?<br />What voices is it important to have in the video in order to have political, ethical, analytical and emotional credibility and impact? <br />
    39. 39. REVIEWING VIDEOS<br />What is the Objective of the video?<br />What is the Audience of the video?<br />What is the Message of the video?<br />What is the Story of the video?<br />What is the request for action? <br />
    40. 40. CASE STUDY: ‘On The Frontines’<br />Partner/Location:Ajedi-Ka, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo <br />Objective:Reduce voluntary recruitment of children into militia and armed groups<br />Audience:Community members in eastern Congo in areas at risk of recruitment<br />Message:<br />Story/Voices:<br />Distribution:<br />Impact:<br />
    41. 41. CASE STUDY: ‘On The Frontines’<br />Partner/Location:Ajedi-Ka, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo <br />Objective:Reduce voluntary recruitment of children into militia and armed groups<br />Audience:Community members in eastern Congo in areas at risk of recruitment<br />Message: Participation in the militia has short and long-term consequences for children and is not in their best interests<br />Story/Voices: Young people talk about the impact on them and we see visual evidence from the camps<br />Distribution: In community screenings across eastern Congo<br />Impact:Reduction in voluntary recruitment; later videos contribute to prioritization of issue at international level<br />
    42. 42. CASE STUDY: ‘A Duty To Protect’<br />Partner/Location:Ajedi-Ka, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo <br />Objective:<br />Audience:Opinion-formers at international level including ICC investigators themselves<br />Message: <br />Story/Voices:<br />Distribution:<br />Impact:<br />
    43. 43. CASE STUDY: ‘A Duty To Protect’<br />Partner/Location:Ajedi-Ka, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo <br />Objective:Encourage the ICC to prioritize the issue of child soldiers and sexual violence in its investigation in DRC(and also to invest in community outreach) <br />Audience:Opinion-formers at international level including ICC investigators themselves<br />Message: i) Child soldiers should be a priority issue for the ICC as well as sexual violence against girl soldiers + ii) More community outreach is needed in eastern Congo iii) Call for US engagement<br />Story/Voices: Through the stories of two young women framed by an authoritative narrator<br />Distribution: Shown internationally and to ICC officials<br />Impact:Contributed to prioritization of issue at international level including at ICC in first prosecution<br />
    44. 44. STEP 4: RIGHT STORY<br />1. Condense your story to one sentence.<br />2. How will you tell the story? Knowing your audience you can now choose: <br />Voices – who is included? who is excluded? <br />Style – MTV vs. News vs. ?<br />Structure – beginning -> middle -> end -> ACTION<br />A/V Elements – what sound and visuals are in it?<br />Length – driven by your primary audience(!)<br />Language – driven by your primary audience(!)<br />SPACE FOR ACTION – and clear request for it<br />
    45. 45. Case Study: Missing Lives<br />Location/Partners: Chechnya with Memorial Human Rights Center offices in the North Caucasus (Chechnya, Dagestan, Ingushetia, North Ossetia) <br />Objective: Push for official action to end impunity and provide redress for the crimes of enforced disappearances, torture, and extrajudicial killings.<br />Audience: Government of the Russian republics in the North Caucasus; Prosecutors' Offices; Ombudsman of the Russian Federation; Federal and local government officials; European and international policy makers; solidarity groups<br />Message:<br />Story:<br />Voices:<br />
    46. 46. Case Study: Missing Lives<br />Location/Partners: Chechnya with Memorial Human Rights Center offices in the North Caucasus (Chechnya, Dagestan, Ingushetia, North Ossetia) <br />Objective: Push for official action to end impunity and provide redress for the crimes of enforced disappearances, torture, and extrajudicial killings.<br />Audience: Government of the Russian republics in the North Caucasus; Prosecutors' Offices; Ombudsman of the Russian Federation; Federal and local government officials; European and international policy makers; solidarity groups<br />Message: Need to break through the system of lawlessness surrounding the crimes of disappearances <br />Story: Insight into damage done in the lives of people whose loved have vanished; A survivor of abduction and torture speaks about his ordeal at the prison site<br />Voices: Relatives of the missing people, a torture survivor <br />Distribution approach: Used in public screenings in Chechnya, Russia, and international advocacy fora<br />
    47. 47. STEP 5: STRATEGIC DISTRO<br />Who are your distribution allies?<br />Timing: Is there a key premiere date?<br />Sequencing: What are your distribution opps?<br />Choosing the right “messenger”<br />
    48. 48. 5 NEW(ISH) USES OF VIDEO<br />Pocket-power: Mobile Phones<br />Immediate: Livestreaming video<br />Amplify: User-generated voices<br />Geo-specific: Location-mapped video<br />Remixing advocacy videos <br />
    49. 49. CAPTURING ABUSES<br />
    50. 50. DOCUMENT: LIVESTREAMING<br />
    51. 51. USER-GENERATED SWARM<br />
    52. 52. USER-GENERATED SWARM<br />
    53. 53. NOT SO FAST…<br />
    54. 54. WHO’S AT RISK HERE?<br />
    55. 55. EGYPT<br />
    56. 56. IRAN<br />
    57. 57. SPOTLIGHT: FIVE TRENDSaffecting human rights advocacy<br />Accessibility<br />Participation<br />Accountability<br />Amplification <br />Mobilization<br />
    58. 58. STRONG FOUNDATION…<br />Good Stories & Storytelling for Change<br />Know Your Audience <br />Message -> Story -> Action<br />Use & Enhance Best Practices <br />+ Safety & Security <br />+ Informed Consent<br />
    59. 59. WITNESS.org<br />WITNESS.org/training<br />chris@witness.org<br />
    60. 60. CASE STUDIES<br />
    61. 61. Watch the video as a critical viewer, thinking about its objective, audience, message, story and voices. <br />After watching the video take ten minutes to discuss it with your neighbors – what do you identify as the message, story and voices?<br /> After ten minutes, we’ll hear a sample of the discussions<br />
    62. 62. Case Study: ‘Books Not Bars’<br />Location/Partners: California with Ella Baker Center For Human Rights<br />Objective: Mobilize support around initiatives to confront the ‘prison-industrial complex’<br />Audience: Youth activists<br />Message:<br />Story:<br />Voices:<br />Distribution approach:<br />
    63. 63. Case Study: ‘Books Not Bars’<br />Location/Partners: California with Ella Baker Center For Human Rights<br />Objective: Mobilize support around initiatives to confront the ‘prison-industrial complex’<br />Audience: Youth activists<br />Message: You are directly affected by this system, you need to challenge it, and have the power to win<br />Story: Told through a series of narratives of youth activism including success stories<br />Voices: Primarily youth and supportive activists and academics<br />Distribution approach: To be screened in organizing settings often alongside music and spoken word; paired with teaching pack for use in schools<br />
    64. 64. Case Study: CEMIRIDE Evidentiary Video<br />Location/Partners: Kenya with CEMIRIDE and Minority Rights Group<br />Objective: Secure ruling from African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights on displacement of Endorois people from their ancestral lands in Kenya<br />Audience: African Commission, to be followed up with a public engagement campaign using a different version of video<br />Message: Endorois people have suffered violations of their rights under specific articles of the African Charter<br />Story:<br />Voices:<br />Distribution approach: Screened at African Commission alongside legal submission and in-person advocacy <br />
    65. 65. Case Study: CEMIRIDE Evidentiary Video<br />Location/Partners: Kenya with CEMIRIDE and Minority Rights Group<br />Objective: Secure ruling from African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights on displacement of Endorois people from their ancestral lands in Kenya<br />Audience: African Commission, to be followed up with a public engagement campaign using a different version of video<br />Message: Endorois people have suffered violations of their rights under specific articles of the African Charter<br />Story: Focused on showing the daily life of Endorois today contrasted to specific treaty obligations of Kenya government<br />Voices: Lead by young man, with voices of other ages<br />Distribution approach: Screened at African Commission alongside legal submission and in-person advocacy <br />
    66. 66. Case Study: Crying Sun<br />Location/Partners: Chechnya with Memorial Human Rights Center office in Grozny<br />Objective: Secure the return of villagers to their homes in the Caucasus Mountains; Push for the establishment of programs to restore the cultural heritage; Investigate the abduction of four Zumsoy residents and prosecute the perpetrators <br />Audience: Chechen government officials and administrations of local districts; Prosecutors and Ombudsmans; European and international policy makers; solidarity groups<br />Message: War is destroying the unique aspect of Chechen culture - secure return of villagers to their ancestral homes<br />Story: Told by Zumsoy villagers and portrays their struggle to preserve cultural identity and traditions in the context of military raids and enforced disappearances<br />Voices: Chechen villagers, local school principal, teacher <br />Distribution approach: Used in communal and individual screenings in Chechnya, Russia, and international advocacy fora<br />
    67. 67. Case Study: Missing Lives<br />Location/Partners: Chechnya with Memorial Human Rights Center offices in the North Caucasus (Chechnya, Dagestan, Ingushetia, North Ossetia) <br />Objective: Push for official action to end impunity and provide redress for the crimes of enforced disappearances, torture, and extrajudicial killings.<br />Audience: Government of the Russian republics in the North Caucasus; Prosecutors' Offices; Ombudsman of the Russian Federation; Federal and local government officials; European and international policy makers; solidarity groups<br />Message: Need to break through the system of lawlessness surrounding the crimes of disappearances <br />Story: Insight into damage done in the lives of people whose loved have vanished; A survivor of abduction and torture speaks about his ordeal at the prison site<br />Voices: Relatives of the missing people, a torture survivor <br />Distribution approach: Used in public screenings in Chechnya, Russia, and international advocacy fora<br />
    68. 68. Case Study: Duty to Protect<br />Location/Partners: DRC with Ajedi-Ka, P.E.S.<br />Objective: Encourage ICC Prosecutor’s Office to prioritize issues of child soldiers and sexual violence in its initial charges in DRC<br />Audience: Officials and prosecutors at the ICC, international audiences concerned about DRC and ICC<br />Message: Need for focus on sexual violence within ICC investigations; need for ICC outreach offices in eastern DRC; call to US for engagement<br />Story: Told through stories of two young women affected by sexual violence<br />Voices: Young women, and voice of a human rights advocate<br />Distribution approach: Used in communal and individual screenings in US, and at ICC, as well as worldwide subsequently<br />
    69. 69. Drafting a Video Action Plan<br />You will need to identify:<br />Objective?<br />Audience?<br />Message?<br />Timing/Sequencing?<br />Strategy for Participation<br />
    70. 70. Location/Partner: India, Chintan with IMAK and Video Volunteers<br />Advocacy objective:Support the rights to livelihood of waste-pickers in Delhi<br />
    71. 71. CASE STUDY: ‘Counterbalance’<br />Location/Partner: India, Chintan with IMAK and Video Volunteers<br />Human rights advocacy objective:Support the rights to livelihood of waste-pickers in Delhi<br />Message::An alternative model exists that provides for workers’ livelihoods and is cost-effective<br />Story/Voices: :Waste-pickers from New Delhi Municipal Council and Municipal Corporation of Delhi; public health professional<br />Distribution: To be shown individually to key members of the Delhi….<br />Impact: To be determined<br />
    72. 72. Location/Partner: Burma, Burma Issues<br />Objective:Support the push to refer Burma to the UNSC under ‘threat to the peace’<br />Message: Actions of Burma’s military regime in eastern Burma are a threat to the peace<br />Story/ Voices:Condensed summary of situation, with emblematic story of one older woman<br />Timing/Distribution: :Used in solidarity organizing and shown to officials in Indonesia, UK, USA and at UN, alongside presentations. Also viewed almost a million times on YouTube.<br />Impact:Supported organizing work; ultimately no referral to UNSC<br />
    73. 73. CASE STUDY: ‘Bound by Promises’<br />Location/Partner: Brazil, CPT and CEJIL<br />Human rights advocacy objective:Propose and support a series of national and state level solutions to challenge use of forced labor including better enforcement, stronger penalties and economic opportunities for workers<br />Message:<br />Story/Voices:<br />Distribution:<br />Impact: units<br />
    74. 74. CASE STUDY: ‘Bound by Promises’<br />Location/Partner: Brazil, CPT and CEJIL<br />Human rights advocacy objective:Propose and support a series of national and state level solutions to challenge use of forced labor including better enforcement, stronger penalties and economic opportunities for workers<br />Message: Forced labor continues in rural areas, and solutions are on the table<br />Story/Voices: A composite of voices from forced laborers and their families, as well as key experts<br />Distribution: Screenings alongside advocacy to policymakers at state and national level; broad public attention via television broadcast<br />Impact:Reinstitution of mobile monitoring units<br />
    75. 75. CASE STUDY: ‘An Age for Justice’<br />Partner/Location:National Council on Aging, USA<br />Objective:Secure passage of Elder Justice ACT<br />Audience: Key members of US House of Representatives and direct service providers<br />Message:<br />Story/Voices:<br />Distribution:<br />Impact:<br />
    76. 76. CASE STUDY: ‘An Age for Justice’<br />Partner/Location:National Council on Aging, USA<br />Objective:Secure passage of Elder Justice ACT<br />Audience: Key members of US House of Representatives and direct service providers<br />Message: Elder Abuse is prevalent; it is preventable; Elder Justice Act is primary solution<br />Story/Voices: Affected persons; service providers; legislators<br />Distribution: Direct screenings with key decision makers; mass distribution with 100 unique videos<br />Impact:Contributed to passage of Elder Justice Act (part of Health Reform Act, 2010)<br />
    77. 77. Think like a Human Rights Advocate and a Video Activist<br />Find a compelling story that you can tell visually, and through testimony<br />Identify compelling individuals who want to tell their story<br />Look for telling details that highlight your story and advocacy goals<br />Be truthful and ethical<br />Make the process empowering for people involved with the video and maintain the integrity of your footage<br />Build the story within a human rights framework and ensure the video can be used as an advocacy tool<br />
    78. 78. Case Study: Hear Us: Women Affected by Political Violence in Zimbabwe Speak Out<br />
    79. 79. STRENGTHS<br />Show or contextualize a violation or its aftermath<br />2) Put a face on human rights advocacy by telling a personal story <br />3) Compress, contrast and juxtapose situations<br />4) Use emotional power to communicate to an audience<br />5) Detail specific cases or incidents that are emblematic of patterns<br />6) Be a democratic and participatory medium<br />7) Serve as a shield<br />LIMITATIONS/SHORTCOMINGS<br />1) Depends on access to places and people<br />2) Limitations in covering structural issues<br />3) Weak for deep quantitative analysis and complex procedural issues<br />4) Technological divide still exists and does not change/remove issues of representation, and process can be less participatory during editing<br />5) Can jeopardize lives<br /> Advocacy and Propaganda?<br />3/7/11<br />72<br />

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