The New Internet World

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Presentation for the Internet and Society Conference, School of Journalism and Communication, Peking University, Beijing, 20 May 2011.

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The New Internet World

  1. 1. The New Internet World:<br />Global Perspectives on <br />Freedom of Expression, Privacy, Trust and Security<br />William H. Dutton <br />Oxford Internet Institute (OII) <br />University of Oxford<br />www.ox.ac.uk<br />Presentation for the Internet and Society Conference, School of Journalism and Communication, Peking University, Beijing, 20 May 2011.<br />
  2. 2. The Old Internet World<br /><ul><li> North America and Western Europe
  3. 3. Academic Innovation in Networking
  4. 4. Marginal to Everyday Life and Work
  5. 5. Utopian and Dystopian Visions
  6. 6. Direct Democracy
  7. 7. Surveillance Society
  8. 8. Politically Irrelevant to Real Politics</li></li></ul><li>The New World<br /><ul><li> Significance to Everyday Life and Work (Oxford Internet Surveys and WIP)
  9. 9. Global Diffusion
  10. 10. Role in Reconfiguring Access
  11. 11. Illustrations of its Political Significance
  12. 12. The Rise of a Fifth Estate</li></li></ul><li>Percentage of Internet Users Across Regions of the World<br />
  13. 13. Role in Reconfiguring Access<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Networked Institutions v Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate<br />
  16. 16. The Fourth and Fifth Estates<br /><ul><li> Press since the 18th Century - the ‘Fourth Estate’
  17. 17. Internet in the 21st - enabling a Fifth Estate</li></ul>−−<br />Enabling people to network with other individuals and with information, services and technical resources in ways that support social accountability in business and industry, government, politics, and the media. <br />
  18. 18. Networked Institutions v Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate<br /><ul><li> Networked Institutions: greater ubiquity, universal access
  19. 19. Networked Individuals of the Fifth Estate: require only a critical mass of users</li></li></ul><li>The Fifth Estate: A Sensitizing Concept <br />
  20. 20. Responses to the New World<br /><ul><li> National Efforts to Control and Regulate
  21. 21. Internet Governance Forum
  22. 22. Technologies of Disconnection: Filtering
  23. 23. Rise of National Values and Attitudes?</li></li></ul><li>Meta-Analysis of Internet Filtering:<br /><ul><li> Countries with high ratings (heaviest filtering) include: China, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Sudan, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.
  24. 24. Countries with medium levels of filtering include: Australia, Bahrain, Egypt, India, Kenya, Malaysia, Russia, Turkey.
  25. 25. Countries filtering, but at comparatively low levels: Azerbaijan, Brazil, Estonia, Italy, Morocco, Singapore, United Kingdom.</li></ul> Source: W. H. Dutton, A. Dopatka, M. Hills, G. Law, and V. Nash (2011), Freedom of Connection – Freedom of Expression: The Changing Legal and Regulatory Ecology Shaping the Internet. Paris: UNESCO. <br />
  26. 26. Raising New Research Questions:<br /><ul><li>How are government policies and practices experienced by the public?
  27. 27. Are public attitudes and values reflecting national political-administrative and cultural traditions?
  28. 28. Are national cultures and political-administrative traditions reshaping the core values underpinning the Internet and Web? </li></li></ul><li>The Global Internet Values Project*<br /><ul><li>Collaboration of OII, INSEAD, and comScore for the World Economic Forum (WEF)
  29. 29. Online Global Survey
  30. 30. Completed by 5,400 Adult Internet Users
  31. 31. Conducted from Oct-Nov 2010
  32. 32. 13 countries: Australia/New Zealand, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, India, Mexico, South Africa, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom</li></ul>*Dutta, S., Dutton, W. H. and Law, G. (2011), The New Internet World: A Global Perspective on Freedom of Expression, Privacy, Trust and Security Online. New York: The World Economic Forum, April. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1810005<br />
  33. 33. Four General Themes and Findings<br /> New online nations are becoming the dominant nations in the Internet world;<br /> Users are developing a global Internet culture: sharing similar concerns, values and attitudes toward expression, privacy, trust, and security; <br /> Newly adopting countries are as liberal, if not more so, in their attitudes, such as support for freedom of expression;<br /> Users in the newly adopting nations are more innovative in their patterns of use, e.g., social networking.<br />
  34. 34. Regions as Percentage of the Worldwide Population of Users<br />
  35. 35. Shared Global Concerns over Trust and Authenticity<br />
  36. 36.
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  38. 38.
  39. 39.
  40. 40.
  41. 41.
  42. 42. Pattern of Findings Supporting Conception of a ‘New Internet World’: Many Limitations<br />
  43. 43. The New Internet World:<br />Global Perspectives on <br />Freedom of Expression, Privacy, Trust and Security<br />William H. Dutton <br />Oxford Internet Institute (OII) <br />University of Oxford<br />www.ox.ac.uk<br />Presentation for the Internet and Society Conference, School of Journalism and Communication, Peking University, Beijing, 20 May 2011.<br />

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