Creative Fundraising In A Changing Economy Aman

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Stacie Aman, Director of AHCA PAC, American Health Care Association presented on Creative Fundraising in a Changing Economy:

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  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • The 1971 Election Laws The Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-225), together with the 1971 Revenue Act (P.L. 92-178), initiated fundamental changes in Federal campaign finance laws. The FECA , effective April 7, 1972, not only required full reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures, but also limited spending on media advertisements. 2 (These limits were later repealed.) The FECA also provided the basic legislative framework for separate segregated funds, 3 popularly referred to as PACs (political action committees), established by corporations and unions. Although the Tillman Act and the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned direct contributions by corporations and labor unions to influence Federal elections, the FECA provided an exception whereby corporations and unions could use treasury funds to establish, operate and solicit voluntary contributions for the organization's separate segregated fund (i.e., PAC). These voluntary donations could then be used to contribute to Federal races.
  • Creative Fundraising In A Changing Economy Aman

    1. 1. Creative Fundraising in a Challenging Economy Stacie E.S. Aman Director, AHCA PAC
    2. 2. Background <ul><li>AHCA PAC RECEIPTS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2008 Cycle: $1.36 million </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2009: $830,000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 300 new donors in 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tough legislative climate </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. 2009 Specifics <ul><li>Grassroots efforts to expand donor base </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ 101” Club </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Find champions and use them as much as possible </li></ul>
    4. 4. NEW LOOK AND FEEL
    5. 5. Communicating Value <ul><li>Quarterly or monthly legislative updates </li></ul><ul><li>Fly-ins </li></ul><ul><li>Committee participation </li></ul><ul><li>Make use of large meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Special briefings and/or events </li></ul><ul><li>Newsletters </li></ul>
    6. 6. Get in Front of Your Donors <ul><li>Legislative Updates </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quarterly or monthly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Welcome questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use it as a PAC “benefit” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Record members </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Strategic Communications <ul><li>Tailor your message to specific groups </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Find out what makes them “tick” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Legislation? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Benefits? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improving the industry? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Make the Connection <ul><li>Use fly-ins as the premiere opportunity to highlight your efforts </li></ul><ul><li>Hill meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Fundraisers </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule “special” briefings </li></ul>
    9. 9. PAC Specific Communications <ul><li>Highlight your donors as much as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight access that was created through the PAC </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight education opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your donors informed </li></ul>
    10. 10. Meetings <ul><li>Attend as many as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Use meetings as an opportunity for leadership to express support </li></ul><ul><li>Peer pressure and “buzz” </li></ul><ul><li>Always have a special event or benefit </li></ul>
    11. 11. Add Value <ul><li>Find ways to add value – many people contribute because they feel they “have to” </li></ul><ul><li>Velvet rope – make them feel like Washington “insiders” </li></ul><ul><li>Photo opportunities ALWAYS appreciated </li></ul><ul><li>Use retreats as special benefit </li></ul><ul><li>Solicit input on improving the program/benefits </li></ul>
    12. 12. Make the Connection Through Grassroots <ul><li>Great example of push vs. pull </li></ul><ul><li>Merge your messages </li></ul><ul><li>Make the connection </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the district </li></ul><ul><li>PAC is never as powerful on its own </li></ul>
    13. 13. Questions?

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